CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam-English Language Arts
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CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam-English Language Arts

by Jerry Bobrow
     
 

The CliffsTestPrep series offers full-length practice exams that simulate the real tests; proven test-taking strategies to increase your chances at doing well; and thorough review exercises to help fill in any knowledge gaps.

CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam: English-Language Arts can help you pass this critical competency exam

Overview

The CliffsTestPrep series offers full-length practice exams that simulate the real tests; proven test-taking strategies to increase your chances at doing well; and thorough review exercises to help fill in any knowledge gaps.

CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam: English-Language Arts can help you pass this critical competency exam necessary for high school graduation. More and more high schools are requiring exit exams in order to ensure that all students graduate with a thorough knowledge of state standards in mathematics. This easy-to-use CAHSEE English-Language Arts Preparation Guide gives you that extra edge with

  • Three full-length practice tests
  • Samples and strategies for all question types
  • Review of the California English-Language Arts standards
  • Answers to common questions about the test
  • Analysis charts to help you spot your weaknesses, including Essay Checklists

This book will help you understand the types of questions that will test your knowledge of state standards for grades 8 and 10. In addition, you'll hone your knowledge in all of the key subject areas, such as

  • Word analysis — discovering meaning
  • Reading comprehension — understanding the main idea, purpose and tone
  • Literary response and analysis — understanding characters, relationships, fiction, theme, and poetry
  • Writing strategies — finding and correcting errors
  • Writing conventions — writing an essay

With guidance from the CliffsTestPrep series, you'll feel at home in any standardized-test environment!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764559389
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
02/14/2005
Series:
STUDY AIDS
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
8.38(w) x 10.82(h) x 0.78(d)

Read an Excerpt

CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam


By Jerry Bobrow

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-5938-9


Chapter One

CAHSEE English-Language Arts: Reading

The Reading questions of the CAHSEE English-Language Arts are composed of Word Analysis questions, Reading Comprehension questions, and Literary Response and Analysis questions. The number of questions that actually count toward your score in each of these categories is as follows:

Word Analysis 7 multiple-choice questions

Reading Comprehension 18 multiple-choice questions

Literary Response and Analysis 20 multiple-choice questions

Remember, these question types are not in any particular order. Of the 79 questions on the CAHSEE English-Language Arts, 72 actually count toward your score. Although there will be more than 45 Reading questions, only 45 will count toward your score. The Writing Multiple-Choice questions and one essay will account for the remaining questions.

A special note: The reading passages and the questions following the reading passages are NOT in order of difficulty.

Before you look at the following suggested approaches, keep in mind that there is no substitute for reading widely. Knowing what to look for when you read and knowing how to read and mark a passage actively and efficiently can be very helpful.

Suggested Approaches with Sample Passages

This section will provide you with some general and specific reading strategies followed by samplepassages. The sample passages will be followed by suggested approaches, questions, and a careful analysis of each question.

General Strategies

* Read actively. Read the passage actively, marking main points and other items you feel are important, such as conclusions, names, definitions, places, and numbers. Make only a few such marks per paragraph. Remember, these marks are to help you understand the passage.

* Preread a few questions. You may want to skim a few questions first, marking words that give you a clue about what to look for when you read the passage. This method, called prereading questions, can be especially helpful on unfamiliar passages. Try it on a variety of passages to see how it works for you.

* Pace yourself. Don't get stuck on the passage or on any one question. If you have difficulty with one question, take a guess and return to it briefly before you read the next passage. If possible, try to eliminate some of the choices before guessing, but never leave a question without at least taking a guess.

* Remember that answers are from information given or implied. Base your answer on what you read in the passage, the introduction to the passage, or any other information given with the passage. The passage must support your answer. All questions can and should be answered from information given or implied in the passage.

* Be sure to answer the question. Some good or true answers are not correct. Make sure that the answer you select is what the question is asking for according to the passage.

* Read all choices. Be sure to read all of the choices to make sure that you select the best of the ones given. Some other choices may be good, but you're looking for the best.

* Avoid the attractive distractor. Watch out for attractive distractors, that is, answers that look good, but aren't the best answer. These attractive distractors are usually the most common wrong answers, but they are carefully written to be close to the best answer. When you narrow your choice down to two answers, one is probably the attractive distractor. Reading the question again can help you find the best one.

* Eliminate. Use an elimination strategy. If you know an answer is incorrect, mark it out immediately in your question booklet.

* Take advantage of information given. Some questions will give you part of the text along with the question. These questions will often start with "Read this sentence from the passage," or "What does the word ____ mean in the sentence below taken from the passage?"

* You can skip passages. If you are having trouble with a passage, you may wish to skip it and come back to it later. Be careful, however, if you skip a passage to mark your answers in the proper place on your answer sheet.

* Remember that you can ask for more time on the test if you need it. If you are not finished with the test when the suggested time is up, simply raise your hand and ask the proctor for more time.

Specific Strategies

* Read the passage looking for its main point and its structure. * Make sure that your answer is supported by the passage. * As you read, note the tone of the passage. * Take advantage of the line numbers or paragraph numbers, if there are any. * Use the context to figure out the meaning of the words, even if you're unfamiliar with them. * Read all the choices, since you're looking for the best answer given.

The Approach

Read the passage actively, marking the main points and other items you feel are important. You can mark a passage by underlining or circling important information. But be sure you don't overmark, or you'll defeat the purpose of the technique. The following passage shows one way a test taker might mark a passage to assist in understanding the information given and to quickly return to particular information in the passage when necessary. You may find that circling works better for you or using other marks that you personally find helpful.

Sample Marked Reading Passage

Read the following passage and answer questions 1 through 8.

The Coming Climate

by Thomas R. Karl, Neville Nicholls, and Jonathan Gregory

Human beings have in recent years discovered that they may have succeeded in achieving a momentous but rather unwanted accomplishment. Because of our numbers and our technology, it now seems (5) likely that we have begun altering the climate of our planet.

Climatologists are confident that over the past century, the global average temperature has increased about half a degree Celsius. This warming (10) is thought to be at least partly the result of human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels in power plants and automobiles. Moreover, because populations, national economies, and the use of technology are all growing, the global average temperature (15) is expected to continue increasing, by an additional 1.0 to 3.5 degrees C by the year 2100.

Such warming is just one of the many consequences that climate change can have. Nevertheless, the ways that warming might affect the (20) planet's environment-and therefore, its life-are among the most compelling issues in earth science. Unfortunately, they are also among the most difficult to predict. The effects will be complex and vary considerably from place to place. Of particular (25) interest are the changes in regional climate and local weather and especially extreme events-record temperatures, heat waves, very heavy rainfall, or drought, for example-which could very well have staggering effects on societies, agriculture, (30) and ecosystems.

Based on studies of how the earth's weather has changed over the past century as global temperatures edged upward as well as on sophisticated computer models of climate, it now seems probable (35) that warming will accompany changes in regional weather. For example, longer and more intense heat waves-a likely consequence of an increase in either the mean temperature or in the variability of daily temperatures-would result in public health (40) threats and even unprecedented levels of mortality, as well as in such costly inconveniences as road buckling and high cooling loads, the latter possibly leading to electrical brownouts or blackouts. Climate change would also affect the patterns of (45) rainfall and other precipitation, with some areas getting more and others less, changing global patterns and occurrences of droughts and floods. Similarly, increased variability and extremes in precipitation can exacerbate existing problems in water quality (50) and sewage treatment and in erosion and urban storm-water routing, among others. Such possibilities underscore the need to understand the consequences of humankind's effect on global climate. Researchers have two main-and complementary-methods (55) of investigating these climate changes. Detailed meteorological records go back about a century, which coincides with the period during which the global average temperature increased by half a degree. By examining these measurements (60) and records, climatologists are beginning to get a picture of how and where extremes of weather and climate have occurred. It is the relation between these extremes and the overall temperature increase that really interests scientists. (65) This is where another critical research tool- global ocean-atmosphere climate models-comes in. These high-performance computer programs simulate the important processes of the atmosphere and oceans, giving researchers insights into the links (70) between human activities and major weather and climate events. The combustion of fossil fuels, for example, increases the concentration in the atmosphere of certain greenhouse gases, the fundamental agents (75) of the global warming that may be attributable to humans. These gases, which include carbon dioxide, methane, ozone, halocarbons, and nitrous oxide, let in sunlight but tend to insulate the planet against the loss of heat, not unlike the glass of a (80) greenhouse. Thus a higher concentration means a warmer climate.

Pre-read a Few Questions

Pre-reading can give you a clue about the passage and what to look for. Quickly reading a few of the questions before reading the passage may be very helpful, especially if the passage seems difficult or unfamiliar to you. In pre-reading, read only the questions and NOT the answer choices (which aren't included in the following examples). Notice that you should mark (underline or circle) what the question is asking. After you read the passage, you'll go on to read the questions again and each of their answer choices. The following questions give examples of ways to mark as you pre-read.

1. Which of the following is the main idea of this passage?

Notice that main idea is marked. This is a main-point question and tips you off that you should be sure to read for the main point in the passage.

2. Which of the following inferences is NOT supported by information in the passage?

Notice that inferences ... NOT supported is marked. To answer this question, you'll need to draw information from the passage by "reading between the lines."

3. According to the passage, which of the following terms BEST describes the effects of global warming?

Notice that best describes ... effects of global warming is marked. You now know that the passage involves the effects of global warming.

4. What tone does the author establish in the passage?

The words author and tone are marked here. You now know to pay special attention to the tone of the passage.

After pre-reading and marking the questions, you should go back and read the passage actively. The passage is reprinted here without the marking. Try marking it yourself this time before you go on to the sample questions that follow.

Read the following passage and answer questions 1 through 8. The Coming Climate

by Thomas R. Karl, Neville Nicholls, and Jonathan Gregory

Human beings have in recent years discovered that they may have succeeded in achieving a momentous but rather unwanted accomplishment. Because of our numbers and our technology, it now seems (5) likely that we have begun altering the climate of our planet. Climatologists are confident that over the past century, the global average temperature has increased about half a degree Celsius. This warming (10) is thought to be at least partly the result of human activity, such as the burning of fossil fuels in power plants and automobiles. Moreover, because populations, national economies, and the use of technology are all growing, the global average temperature (15) is expected to continue increasing, by an additional 1.0 to 3.5 degrees C by the year 2100. Such warming is just one of the many consequences that climate change can have. Nevertheless, the ways that warming might affect the (20) planet's environment-and therefore, its life-are among the most compelling issues in earth science. Unfortunately, they are also among the most difficult to predict. The effects will be complex and vary considerably from place to place. Of particular (25) interest are the changes in regional climate and local weather and especially extreme events- record temperatures, heat waves, very heavy rainfall, or drought, for example-which could very well have staggering effects on societies, agriculture, (30) and ecosystems.

Based on studies of how the earth's weather has changed over the past century as global temperatures edged upward as well as on sophisticated computer models of climate, it now seems probable (35) that warming will accompany changes in regional weather. For example, longer and more intense heat waves-a likely consequence of an increase in either the mean temperature or in the variability of daily temperatures-ould result in public health (40) threats and even unprecedented levels of mortality, as well as in such costly inconveniences as road buckling and high cooling loads, the latter possibly leading to electrical brownouts or blackouts. Climate change would also affect the patterns of (45) rainfall and other precipitation, with some areas getting more and others less, changing global patterns and occurrences of droughts and floods. Similarly, increased variability and extremes in precipitation can exacerbate existing problems in water quality (50) and sewage treatment and in erosion and urban storm-water routing, among others. Such possibilities underscore the need to understand the consequences of humankind's effect on global climate. Researchers have two main-and complementary-methods (55) of investigating these climate changes. Detailed meteorological records go back about a century, which coincides with the period during which the global average temperature increased by half a degree. By examining these measurements (60) and records, climatologists are beginning to get a picture of how and where extremes of weather and climate have occurred. It is the relation between these extremes and the overall temperature increase that really interests scientists. (65) This is where another critical research tool-global ocean-atmosphere climate models-comes in. These high-performance computer programs simulate the important processes of the atmosphere and oceans, giving researchers insights into the links (70) between human activities and major weather and climate events. The combustion of fossil fuels, for example, increases the concentration in the atmosphere of certain greenhouse gases, the fundamental agents (75) of the global warming that may be attributable to humans. These gases, which include carbon dioxide, methane, ozone, halocarbons, and nitrous oxide, let in sunlight but tend to insulate the planet against the loss of heat, not unlike the glass of a (80) greenhouse. Thus a higher concentration means a warmer climate.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from CliffsTestPrep California High School Exit Exam by Jerry Bobrow Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

JERRY BOBROW, Ph.D. was a national authority in the field of test preparation. His test-prep company, Bobrow Test Preparation Services, administered test preparation programs at over 25 California institutions.

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