Climate of Fear: Why We Shouldn't Worry About Global Warming

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Conventional wisdom says that global warming is a serious problem. And many people believe the answer to that problem is stringent government regulation - regulation that would lower productivity and standards of living around the world. In "Climate of Fear: Why We Shouldn't Worry About Global Warming", Thomas Gale Moore argues that in this case, as in so many others, conventional wisdom is wrong. If global warming were to occur, it would not be the disaster that many doomsayers have predicted. Instead, most ...
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Overview

Conventional wisdom says that global warming is a serious problem. And many people believe the answer to that problem is stringent government regulation - regulation that would lower productivity and standards of living around the world. In "Climate of Fear: Why We Shouldn't Worry About Global Warming", Thomas Gale Moore argues that in this case, as in so many others, conventional wisdom is wrong. If global warming were to occur, it would not be the disaster that many doomsayers have predicted. Instead, most people would actually benefit from the slightly higher temperatures it would produce. He demonstrates that increased carbon dioxide emissions, coupled with warmer autumns and winters, would boost agricultural production, reduce heating costs, improve transportation, and cut fatalities. And he asks, why should we complain about a four-or five-degree increase in temperature when most people prefer to live in warmer climates, and millions have moved and changed jobs in order to do so?
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Let those greenhouse gasses blossom, says a former member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers and now a fellow at the Hoover Institution. He argues that if the planet is warming at all, it will not be to the extent scientists warn, and even, we will all benefit with lower heating bills, longer growing seasons, and improved health. Moore is an economist without scientific credentials. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781882577644
  • Publisher: Cato Institute
  • Publication date: 1/1/1998
  • Pages: 152
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 The Science Behind Predictions of Climate Change 9
2 Historical Evidence on Climate and Human Well-Being 23
3 The Health Effects of Global Warming 69
4 Weather Benefits and Other Environmental Amenities 89
5 The Economic Costs (Benefits?) of a Warmer World 103
6 Slowing Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Politics and Costs 129
References 159
Index 169
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2000

    Information in this book is not reliable

    In his book, Thomas Moore's argument basically boils down to this : Global warming isn't a problem, and if it is, global warming would actually be a benefit to mankind. There were several issues in this book that dismantled its credibility for me. As a student in the ecological sciences, it seemed to me that Moore's presentation of the data was at times misleading. One such example of this (of which there were many) : Moore writes that in a world enriched with C02, 95 percent of all plants would grow faster, bigger, and would utilize water more efficiently. While this is true, it is also true that the metabolism of plants would be sped up (meaning their life span would shorten) and their nutritional value would decrease (as the ratio of carbon:nitrogen:phosphorous in the plant became more weighted towards carbon). This would mean that herbivores would need to eat more of these less-nutritious plants to get enough nitrogen and phosphorous to survive. However, these important points weren't mentioned. Another issue which I found a bit disturbing was that the author says many times that moderate global warming will most likely benefit Americans. While this may be true in his economic model, he barely mentions the severe economic impact that global warming will have on countries more dependent on agriculture which would greatly suffer from increasing desertification and those countries where a significant portion of the land would be submerged under a rising sea level. He often writes statements like 'Climate affects principally agriculture, forestry, and fishing, which together constitute less than 2 percent of the US gross domestic product.' (p. 103) Ironically, Third World countries that rely primarily on agriculture and contribute the least to global warming are the most likely to suffer from the consequences. One of the only times in the whole book that I could find where he seriously addresses the consequences on poorer regions of the world is when he says 'For some small island nations, of course, the problems could be much more severe and their hardships should be addressed.' (p.104) He goes on in no further detail about this, however. Finally, on the last flap of the book, it describes the publisher - the Cato Institute, funded primarily by corporations and individuals, which has published other similar books, some among them claiming that air pollution is not a problem and that Earth's resources are in fact not being depleted. I believe these books are highly suspect as far as scientific objectivity goes and would question which corporations and individuals are funding these books/authors and what may be their motives - to honestly seek the truth, or to deceive and confuse the public about important issues in order to further their own interests. Out of curiosity, I just recently looked at the Cato Institute's annual report, and indeed Chevron, Exxon, Amoco, Unocal, and the American Petroleum Institute were among its sponsors the year this book was published.

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