Climbing Lincoln's Steps: The African American Journey

Climbing Lincoln's Steps: The African American Journey

by Suzanne Slade, Colin Bootman
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


This empowering and emotionally driven story showcases significant moments in African American history that tie back to the Lincoln Memorial by introducing iconic civil rights activists as well as exploring President Abraham Lincoln's role in abolishing slavery. This book highlights the hardships and triumphs faced while fighting for racial equality in America.

Overview


This empowering and emotionally driven story showcases significant moments in African American history that tie back to the Lincoln Memorial by introducing iconic civil rights activists as well as exploring President Abraham Lincoln's role in abolishing slavery. This book highlights the hardships and triumphs faced while fighting for racial equality in America.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This handsome picture book outlines the history of the civil rights struggle and its leaders." Booklist

"Bootman’s illustrations clearly portray the emotions—fear, determination, joy—of the people present at each moment." Kirkus Reviews

"This is an excellent chronicle of important steps made toward equality since Abraham Lincoln in a picture book format." Library Media Connection

Children's Literature - Leila Toledo
One of the Washington Monuments that has become a backdrop for important events in African American history has been the Lincoln Memorial. In 1939, Marian Anderson was not allowed to sing at Constitution Hall because she was African American. Eleanor Roosevelt, the president's wife, intervened and arranged for her to sing at the Lincoln Memorial. In 1963 Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke at the Lincoln Memorial dreaming that the day would come when his children would be judged by their character and not by the color of their skin. Then in 2009, America's first African American president and his family went to Lincoln Memorial to honor the man who gave African American's hope. The text and illustrations by Colin Bootman, a Coretta Scott King Honor Artist, have given us a graphic rendition of rendition of African Americans' journey towards equality. Reviewer: Leila Toledo
School Library Journal
Gr 2–5—This attractive, accessible title uses the Lincoln Memorial as a vehicle to outline the history of the Civil Rights Movement from the Emancipation Proclamation to Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech to the 2008 presidential election. Other pivotal moments include world-renowned singer Marian Anderson's 1939 performance at the memorial when she was barred from singing at Constitution Hall. Slade explains in clear, descriptive prose how the memorial "was created from twenty-eight smaller pieces carved out of white marble." Bootman's realistic watercolor spreads are striking; one of them features portraits of several accomplished African-Americans, including Toni Morrison, Mae Jemison, Colin Powell, and Oprah Winfrey. "Change. It happens slowly. One small step at a time," is the refrain that echoes repeatedly along with the "Pitter-patter….Click, click, click….Clomp, clomp" of the children, women, and men who climb the steps of the iconic structure. An afterword asks youngsters, "Can you help make change happen?" and describes the steps taken by Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass, Jackie Robinson, and Rosa Parks. A time line that begins with Douglass's escape from slavery highlights some African-American "firsts."—Barbara Auerbach, PS 217, Brooklyn, NY
Kirkus Reviews
When work was begun on the Lincoln Memorial in 1914, no one could have imagined the history that would later unfold at the site. Slade uses the Memorial to create a brief series of snapshots of African-American history, beginning with the background that connects Abraham Lincoln to African-Americans. She moves on to Marian Anderson's legendary performance and Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington and culminates with the inauguration of Barack Obama. Each moment is narrated in the present tense, providing sensory details to evoke atmosphere and just enough background to create meaning for the audience. Bootman's illustrations clearly portray the emotions—fear, determination, joy—of the people present at each moment. The final two-page spread of the First Family viewing the Memorial is especially moving. Readers will find in this introduction a good overview and a solid base on which to continue building their knowledge of not only African-American history but the history of the United States. Thumbnail biographies of other changemakers and a timeline follow the text. (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807512050
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
11/01/2016
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,354,193
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Suzanne Slade is the author of over seventy books for children. Her works include picture books and biographies as well as titles about animals, sports, and nature. She lives in Illinois with her husband and children.

Colin Bootman was born in Trinidad. He moved to the United States when he was seven, but the vibrant palette of the Caribbean has always influenced his painting. In 2004, he received a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Award. He lives in New York.