Climbing Your Family Tree: Online and off-Line Genealogy for Kids

Climbing Your Family Tree: Online and off-Line Genealogy for Kids

by Ira Wolfman, Tim Robinson
     
 


In the ten years since the publication of Do People Grow on Family

Trees? (121,000 copies in print), the Internet has completely transformed genealogy, making family history the second most popular hobby in the U.S. after gardening and genealogy the second most searched for subject on the Web.

Now completely revised, updated, retitled, and filled with

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Overview


In the ten years since the publication of Do People Grow on Family

Trees? (121,000 copies in print), the Internet has completely transformed genealogy, making family history the second most popular hobby in the U.S. after gardening and genealogy the second most searched for subject on the Web.

Now completely revised, updated, retitled, and filled with detailed guidance on utilizing the Internet, Climbing Your Family Tree is the comprehensive, kid-friendly genealogical primer for the 21st century, and a dramatic story of how and why our ancestors undertook the arduous voyages of immigration to this nation. It teaches kids to track down important family documents, including ships' manifests, naturalization papers, and birth, marriage, and death certificates; create oral histories; make scrapbooks of photos, sayings, and legends; and compile a family tree. A full chapter is devoted to the online search, and relevant Internet information has been incorporated into all the other chapters. Also new are more kids' genealogical stories and a reworked, easier-to-use design, and supporting the book will be a Web site that will include record-keeping pages, links to sites in the book, and more.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA
This exciting introduction to genealogical research for young people and beginners incorporates Internet and online resources. Wolfman inspires beginning researchers with tales of ordinary youth who have uncovered amazing facts about their families. Using stories to illustrate his points, Wolfman shows readers how they too can become "ancestor detectors." Chapters begin with bulleted lists of what readers will learn, and end with "Detector To-Do Lists." Ample charts, worksheets, photographs, and questionnaires allow readers to visualize and organize information. Two chapters are devoted to immigration. One explains how and why people immigrated, while the other describes what their lives here were like. These chapters lead to information on searching for records, explaining the importance of vital and census records, citizenship papers, passenger ship lists, cemetery records, land sales, wills, and military, religious, and school records. A complete chapter on Internet and computer resources includes tips for searching online and understanding information authority. The author maintains a Web site at http://www.workman.com/familytree/ that complements this edition. Libraries are not forgotten, and a list of fifteen public library genealogical centers is included. For the beginning adult researcher or young person with a personal or academic interest in family research, Wolfman provides a comprehensive outline of the why and how to of genealogical research. Informative and well written, this resource turns the reader into a detective, and genealogy into a mystery that must be solved. The author breaks down the enormous task of discovering one's family history into manageable and attainable"to-do lists," in this invaluable research tool. Index. Illus. Biblio. Appendix. Further Reading. VOYA Codes: 5Q 2P M J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2002, Workman, 228p,
— Jessica Mize
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-In this revised, updated edition of Do People Grow on Family Trees? (Workman, 1991), Wolfman enthusiastically and thoroughly covers all aspects of genealogy, from forms, heirlooms, interviews, and names to immigration, documents, adoption, and Internet resources. Numerous examples; helpful, amusing sidebars and illustrations; and clear instructions are found throughout the volume. Each of the 11 chapters begins with a summary and ends with a handy "To-Do List." The book even has a companion Web site that includes links to useful URLs, downloadable charts and checklists, tips, quizzes, and games. Unfortunately, the list for further reading relies heavily on old, out-of-print titles, and more up-to-date books are available. Still, Family Tree is the best children's book available on the subject, and will be profitable and inspiring to adults as well.-Ann W. Moore, Schenectady County Public Library, NY Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761125396
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2001
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.61(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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