Clinical Anatomy and Management of Low Back Pain: Clinical Anatomy and Management of Back Pain / Edition 1

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Overview

Back pain is multifaceted and it demands the sharing of ideas and knowledge to improve the management offered to patients.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Dana J Lawrence, DC, MMedEd, MA (Palmer College of Chiropractic)
Description: This book presents an overview of the complexity of spinal pain and looks at a wide variety of potential treatment approaches, most of which are conservative in nature. This is especially so with regard to chiropractic management. The book first looks at the anatomical/pathological basis of low back pain, then moves into describing its neurophysiological basis. Only after a sound basis for pain has been established do the authors then move to describing treatment options. This reflects the authors' training as FT, PhD (Singer) and DC, PhD (Giles); both have doctorates in anatomy.
Purpose: There is a great deal of confusion and little consensus with regard to the treatment and management of low back pain. While a lot of books exist that discuss this subject, few do so from the perspective offered here. While diagnosis is not downplayed, the emphasis is on understanding how pain and problems arise. Once that understanding is achieved, it becomes easier to select an appropriate intervention.
Audience: The audience will mainly consist of chiropractors, osteopaths, and physical therapists, as well as their students. There will also be interest by medical physiatrists and by those who want a more pathoanatomical understanding of the cause of low back pain.
Features: One strength of this book is its use of photomicrographs of the anatomy of involved areas. This reflects, in particular, Dr. Giles' training; he developed staining procedures as part of his doctoral studies. These help to illustrate concepts relating to the anatomical and neurological basis of low back pain. The author list is also impressive, drawing on individuals from a variety of associated disciplines.
Assessment: This is a strong and comprehensive text that examines its topic from a new and exciting perspective. It will supplement existing texts and should fit nicely into basic chiropractic, osteopathic, and physical therapy curricula. The material is logically organized so that anatomy is learned before physiology, and both come before diagnosis and treatment. I highly recommend this text.
From the Publisher
"The book is a pleasure to read, and contains many detailed histological preparations of various joint structures and neural elements relevant to the lumbar spine. There are also numerous clear and well illustrated radiographs which supplement the text.

Overall, the text covers almost every conceivable aspect of anatomy, pathophysiology and histopathology relevant to the structure and function of the lumbar spine required to approach professional clinical management of mechanical forms of low back pain. This text should be part of any clinical reference library, and is definitely recommended reading for undergraduates and postgraduates in all health disciplines. The approach is fundamentally practical and functional in nature, whcih supports manipulative management of low back pain disability."European Journal of Chiropractic, April 2001
editors are well known in the field of spinal research and they have brought alongside them a number of renowned contributors in the various chapters. [...] The editors and contributors are to be congratulated on providing a text which takes a multidisciplinary approach to the management of low back pain. They have succeeded in their intention to promote communication between the professions in order to develop a stronger scientific basis for spinal care and to improve the management of patients with mechanical low back pain."Manual Therapy, August 2000
a comprehensive review of clinically relevant information ...

This is a definitive text ... It demands that you own it, actually read it and then live with it. You and your patients will be the immediate beneficiaries.
Such is the power of Lynton s work"Chiropractic Journal of Australia potential problem for this book is that its most obvious rival uses a similar framework, anatomy, to approach the problems of low back pain. Given that most physiotherapists who work in this field will already have a copy of Bogduk s Clinical Anatomy of the Lumbar Spine and Sacrum the obvious question is what is different about this book that will make me want to buy it?

For starters you get a very readable, though comprehensive chapter on the epidemiology of low back pain. While such a chapter is uncommon in physiotherapy texts on low back pain, the information it presents on prevalence and risk and prognostic factors is vital for informed practice. Perhaps surprisingly, notable differences between the books lie in the 15 chapters devoted to anatomy and physiology. There are sufficient differences to ensure that those who are interested in anatomy would definitely want both books. While I would not want to say which book covers the area better, the undoubted strength of this section of the book is the artwork, particular the photographs of histological sections and dissected specimens.

The final section deals with diagnosis and management, with separate chapters provided by radiologists, phychologists, medical practitioners, chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists. Each of the chapters provides an overview on the management of low back pain from the perspective of that profession. I believe this is where the two books differ most and this is one of the strengths of the Giles and Singer book, because it encourages a team approach to the management of low back pain.

Physiotherapists will find the chapters written by osteopaths and chiropractors particularly interesting and may be surprised at the similarities between the approaches of these two professions and their own in managing low back pain.

... I believe that the editors have produced a valuable contribution to the field and I would recommend the book to readers." Christopher Maher, MMPAA, PhD, Senior Lecturer, School of Physiotherapy, The University of Sydney, Australian Physiotherapy, Vol 44, No. 4, 1998, January 1998
is a phenomenal book that contains tremendous amounts of information and is loaded with references for the student, practising clinician, researcher and academician. The text starts off good and only gets better as the reading continues. Drs Giles and Singer are to be complimented for the individual contributions and the selection of authors for individual chapters. The chapters are organized, concise and full of information.
The reader will be enriched and challenged by this book. It is an excellent resource for any person who deals with back pain. It is part of a series on back pain, and if the others are as good as volume 1, they are also must reads. Kudos to the participants of this undertaking."Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, Vol 21, No 8, October 1998

Dana J. Lawrence
This book presents an overview of the complexity of spinal pain and looks at a wide variety of potential treatment approaches, most of which are conservative in nature. This is especially so with regard to chiropractic management. The book first looks at the anatomical/pathological basis of low back pain, then moves into describing its neurophysiological basis. Only after a sound basis for pain has been established do the authors then move to describing treatment options. This reflects the authors' training as FT, PhD (Singer) and DC, PhD (Giles); both have doctorates in anatomy. There is a great deal of confusion and little consensus with regard to the treatment and management of low back pain. While a lot of books exist that discuss this subject, few do so from the perspective offered here. While diagnosis is not downplayed, the emphasis is on understanding how pain and problems arise. Once that understanding is achieved, it becomes easier to select an appropriate intervention. The audience will mainly consist of chiropractors, osteopaths, and physical therapists, as well as their students. There will also be interest by medical physiatrists and by those who want a more pathoanatomical understanding of the cause of low back pain. One strength of this book is its use of photomicrographs of the anatomy of involved areas. This reflects, in particular, Dr. Giles' training; he developed staining procedures as part of his doctoral studies. These help to illustrate concepts relating to the anatomical and neurological basis of low back pain. The author list is also impressive, drawing on individuals from a variety of associated disciplines. This is a strong and comprehensive text that examinesits topic from a new and exciting perspective. It will supplement existing texts and should fit nicely into basic chiropractic, osteopathic, and physical therapy curricula. The material is logically organized so that anatomy is learned before physiology, and both come before diagnosis and treatment. I highly recommend this text.

5 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Section I: Introduction and Epidemiology: - 1. Introduction; 2. The epidemiology of low back pain: Section II: Anatomy and Pathology - 3. Introductory graphic anatomy of the lumbosacral spine; 4. Lumbar invertebral discs; 5. Zygapophysial (facet) joints; 6. Spinal and invertebral canals; 7. Ligaments related to the intervertebral canal and foramen; 8. Blood supply of lumbosacral vertebrae, spinal cord, nerve roots and ganglia; 9. Muscles and ligaments of the back; 10. Biomechanics of the lumbosacral spine; 11. Sacroiliac joint; 12. Pathoanatomy of the thoracolumbar transitional junction; 13. Miscellaneous pathological and developmental (anomalous) conditions: Section III: Spinal Clinical Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology - 14. Innervation of spinal structures; 15. Nerves, neuropeptides and inflammation in spinal tissues, mechanisms of back pain; 16. Anatomy and physiology of spinal nerve roots and the results of compression and irritation; 17. The pathoanatomic basis of somatic, autonomic and neurogenic syndromes originating in the lumbosacral spine: Section VI: Diagnosis and Management - 18. Imaging of mechanical and degenerative syndromes of the lumbar spine; 19. Psychosocial aspects of back pain; 20. Diagnosis of mechanical low back pain with or without referred leg pain; 21. Medical and surgical management of low back pain of mechanical origin; 22. Chiropractic management of low back pain of mechanical origin; 23. Osteopathic management of mechanical low back pain; 24. Physiotherapy management of low back pain of mechanical origin; 25. Contraindications to spinal manipulation: Section V: Definitions and Abbreviations

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