Clinical Nutrition of the Essential Trace Elements and Minerals: The Guide for Health Professionals / Edition 1

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Overview

Despite widespread interest in nutrition and the public's appetite for fresh information from health professionals, health care providers often lack accurate, clinically relevant, and current information on topics of special concern to their patients. In Clinical Nutrition of the Essential Trace Elements and Minerals: The Guide for Health Professionals, John Bogden, PhD, Leslie Klevay, MD, and a host of recognized experts address this major gap in the literature with a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of the biological roles and clinical importance of mineral and trace element nutrients. These authoritative researchers and clinicians review the clinical relevance of trace elements and minerals such as chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, iodine, molybdenum, manganese, selenium, zinc, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus to a wide variety of medical conditions. Among the diseases treated are genetic, endocrine, skeletal, cardiovascular, kidney, gastrointestinal, infectious, surgical, and ophthalmologic disorders. The authors also discuss trace element and mineral nutrition in healthy people, with chapters on pregnancy, lactation, adolescents, and older people. Chapters on preagricultural and modern consumption patterns, epidemiology, and laboratory diagnostic tests are also included. Timely and comprehensive, Clinical Nutrition of the Essential Trace Elements and Minerals: The Guide for Health Professionals offers today's physicians, nutritionists, and dietitians an authoritative resource replete with sound dietary and medical advice suitable for daily use with their clients and patients.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Zhaoming Xu, BSc, MSc, PhD (University of British Columbia)
Description: In this book the focus is on the clinical importance of nine trace elements (chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, iodine, molybdenum, manganese, selenium, and zinc) with some discussion on three major elements (calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus) and some other trace elements where relevant.
Purpose: This purpose is to provide up-to-date information in the area of trace element nutrition, and to serve as a text and reference for those in the field of nutrition.
Audience: The targeted audience is healthcare professionals, including physicians, registered dietitians, nurses, nutrition researchers, and college and university faculty, as well as health science students.
Features: Discussion of the nine trace elements is organized in three parts. In the first part the basic concepts, consumption, deficiency, and toxicity of trace elements are presented. In the second part trace mineral nutrition in healthy people is covered, followed by coverage of the trace element nutrition in diseases. This is a unique approach to outline the role of trace element in health and disease conditions. In the body, trace elements do not work alone, but in concert with other nutrients. Contributors discuss trace element nutrition within the content of a specific condition or group of diseases rather than taking the classical approach, which is a discussion of trace element nutrition along the line of individual trace element.
Assessment: The editors provide a comprehensive overview of trace element nutrition in health and disease, and this renders this book a good reference for healthcare professionals. Still, they fall short on the biochemical and physiological functions of the trace elements discussed. The new and unique approach taken by the editors is useful in helping readers to put trace mineral nutrition in perspective rather than in isolation.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Zhaoming Xu, BSc, MSc, PhD(University of British Columbia)
Description: In this book the focus is on the clinical importance of nine trace elements (chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, iodine, molybdenum, manganese, selenium, and zinc) with some discussion on three major elements (calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus) and some other trace elements where relevant.
Purpose: This purpose is to provide up-to-date information in the area of trace element nutrition, and to serve as a text and reference for those in the field of nutrition.
Audience: The targeted audience is healthcare professionals, including physicians, registered dietitians, nurses, nutrition researchers, and college and university faculty, as well as health science students.
Features: Discussion of the nine trace elements is organized in three parts. In the first part the basic concepts, consumption, deficiency, and toxicity of trace elements are presented. In the second part trace mineral nutrition in healthy people is covered, followed by coverage of the trace element nutrition in diseases. This is a unique approach to outline the role of trace element in health and disease conditions. In the body, trace elements do not work alone, but in concert with other nutrients. Contributors discuss trace element nutrition within the content of a specific condition or group of diseases rather than taking the classical approach, which is a discussion of trace element nutrition along the line of individual trace element.
Assessment: The editors provide a comprehensive overview of trace element nutrition in health and disease, and this renders this book a good reference for healthcare professionals. Still, they fall short on the biochemical and physiological functions of the trace elements discussed. The new and unique approach taken by the editors is useful in helping readers to put trace mineral nutrition in perspective rather than in isolation.
Zhaoming Xu
In this book the focus is on the clinical importance of nine trace elements (chromium, copper, fluoride, iron, iodine, molybdenum, manganese, selenium, and zinc) with some discussion on three major elements (calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus) and some other trace elements where relevant. This purpose is to provide up-to-date information in the area of trace element nutrition, and to serve as a text and reference for those in the field of nutrition. The targeted audience is healthcare professionals, including physicians, registered dietitians, nurses, nutrition researchers, and college and university faculty, as well as health science students. Discussion of the nine trace elements is organized in three parts. In the first part the basic concepts, consumption, deficiency, and toxicity of trace elements are presented. In the second part trace mineral nutrition in healthy people is covered, followed by coverage of the trace element nutrition in diseases. This is a unique approach to outline the role of trace element in health and disease conditions. In the body, trace elements do not work alone, but in concert with other nutrients. Contributors discuss trace element nutrition within the content of a specific condition or group of diseases rather than taking the classical approach, which is a discussion of trace element nutrition along the line of individual trace element. The editors provide a comprehensive overview of trace element nutrition in health and disease, and this renders this book a good reference for healthcare professionals. Still, they fall short on the biochemical and physiological functions of the trace elements discussed. The new and unique approach taken by theeditors is useful in helping readers to put trace mineral nutrition in perspective rather than in isolation.
Booknews
Sufficient intake of elements from aluminum to zinc may be as crucial as getting the Recommended Dietary Allowances of vitamins. These 21 contributed chapters represent not only growing recognition of the importance of nutrition science for its impact on health and policy, but also a paradigm shift (closer to alternative medicine!) in thinking about the relationship between mineral nutrition and chronic disease (e.g. heart disease, HIV/AIDS). Sections address basic concepts, consumption, deficiency, and toxicity; and trace element and mineral nutrition in health, and in disease groups. A list of recent books and journals on the subject is appended. Bogden is a professor of preventive medicine and community health at the New Jersey Medical School, Newark. Klevay is with the USDA Agricultural Research Service's Grand Forks (ND) Human Nutrition Research Center. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780896035980
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 7/28/2000
  • Series: Nutrition and Health Series
  • Edition description: 2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 399
  • Product dimensions: 7.31 (w) x 10.31 (h) x 1.24 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I. Basic Concepts, Consumption, Deficiency, and Toxicity. The Essential Trace Elements and Minerals: Basic Concepts, John D. Bogden. Possibly Essential Trace Elements, Forrest H. Nielsen. Consumption of Trace Elements and Minerals by Preagricultural Humans, Stanley B. Eaton III and S. Boyd Eaton. Current Dietary Intakes of Trace Elements and Minerals, Jean A. T. Pennington. Laboratory Assessment of Trace Element and Mineral Status, David B. Milne. The Epidemiology of Trace Element Deficiencies, Roberto Masironi. Trace Element and Supplement Safety, John N. Hathcock. Part II. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Healthy People. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Human Pregnancy, Theresa O. Scholl and Thomas M. Reilly. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition During Lactation, Mary Frances Picciano. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Adolescents, Velimir Matkovic, Nancy E. Badenhop, Jasminka Z. Ilich. Trace Element Requirements in the Elderly, Ronni Chernoff. Part III. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Disease. Genetic Disorders of Trace Element Metabolism, Gregory J. Anderson and Gordon D. McLaren. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Endocrine Diseases, John T. Dunn. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Skeletal Health and Disease, Robert P. Heaney. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Ischemic Heart Disease, Leslie M. Klevay. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Renal Disease, Saulo Klahr. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Gastrointestinal Disease, Giacomo Carlo Sturniolo, Cinzia Mestriner, and Renata D'Incá. Immune Dysfunction in Iron, Copper, and Zinc Deficiencies, Adria R. Sherman. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in HIV Infection and AIDS: Implications for Host Defense, Susanna Cunningham-Rundles. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Hospital, Surgical and Cancer Patients: Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition, M. A. Mohit-Tabatabai. Trace Element and Mineral Nutrition in Diseases of the Eye, George Edwin Bunce. Appendix: Journals and Current Books. Index.

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