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Clinical Pharmacokinetics
     

Clinical Pharmacokinetics

by John E. Murphy
 

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In the complex field of pharmacokinetics, one reference guide has an identity all its own:  Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

Now the fully updated 5th edition brings to experienced practitioners and students alike the fresh information they need

Overview

In the complex field of pharmacokinetics, one reference guide has an identity all its own:  Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

Now the fully updated 5th edition brings to experienced practitioners and students alike the fresh information they need most:

·                     Content organized for fast reference to specific drugs

·                     The latest on dosing in obese and overweight patients

·                     Dosing considerations for neonatal, pediatric and geriatric patients

·                     A look at protein binding and its implications

·                     Population values for a variety of drugs to initiate dosing

·                     Drug dosing in renal disease and creatinine clearance estimation



A Distinctively Straightforward Guide is Now Even Better

The 5th Edition of Clinical Pharmacokinetics is completely revised and updated, making a handy clinical guide even easier to use than ever.

·                     Reorganized content features two sections: Basic Concepts and Special Populations and Specific Drugs and Drug Classes

·                     Sections on special populations, including Dosing in Overweight and Obese Patients, have been conveniently grouped together

·                     Comprehensive introduction covers means, measurements and monitoring

·                     Also conveniently placed up front” a glossary of pharmacokinetics basics and commonly used equations

Editorial Reviews

The Pharmaceutical Journal

Clinical Pharmacokinetics, 5th Edition
edited by John E. Murphy.

 

The Pharmaceutical Journal; 2012; March 6th; Volume 288; Page 311

 

Laurence A. Goldberg is a pharmaceutical consultant from Bury, Lancashire

Genes are only part of the story

This book has been written to help practitioners predict drug doses to achieve target drug concentrations from doses administered to patients. Important chapters on rational use of drug concentration measurements, dosing in overweight and obese patients, dosing considerations for a wider variety of drugs used in neonatal, paediatric and geriatric patients, drug dosing in renal disease and creatinine clearance estimation complete this fifth edition. It offers information for medicines that require an understanding of individual patients’ probable or actual drug concentrations to achieve medication effectiveness and safety.

The authors have taken advantage of advances in knowledge to update the chapters. In many cases, more judicious monitoring of drug concentrations is suggested compared with the earlier editions. In some cases, the dosing approaches are radically different and, in others, new prediction approaches are available that have been tested in larger numbers of patients. Many chapters have been updated to take into account emerging pharmacogenetics knowledge.

Typically, each chapter includes the usual dose range, the bioavailability of the dose forms, general pharmacokinetic information (absorption, distribution, elimination, metabolism, protein binding), clearance, volume of distribution, half-life and time to steady state, therapeutic range, dosing strategies, sampling times, pharmacodynamic monitoring, drug-drug interactions, pharmacodynamic interactions, drug-disease interactions and references.

This book is an excellent reference source offering practitioners the key principles in pharmacokinetics and the application of these principles in drug therapy. Since the tables now comprise international and traditional units for drugs and laboratory tests, the book can be used across the world. All workers in this area of practice should have access to this fine work.

 

— Laurence A. Goldberg

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Melissa M. Ranieri, BS, PharmD (Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: This comprehensive book addresses current challenges in determining patient-specific dosing, such as obesity and renal dysfunction. Pharmacokinetic dosing considerations in special populations, such as the elderly, neonates, and children, are also discussed. Drugs with unique pharmacokinetic properties are also covered, such as the aminoglycosides, phenytoin, and vancomycin, among many others.
Purpose: The book is designed to help determine drug doses to achieve target drug concentrations for medications affected by pharmacokinetic parameters. It also discusses pharmacokinetic controversies, such as the best way to determine renal function in certain populations or the most accurate dose to use in morbidly obese patients. These are issues that clinical pharmacists wrestle with in clinical practice and, often, complete data and guidelines are lacking for special populations. This book does an excellent job of addressing these challenges in a way that is easy to understand and explains the most clinically pertinent information.
Audience: Clinicians or students seeking to properly dose medications with unique pharmacokinetics can use this book. The authors are seasoned professors and clinicians who discuss these topics in a succinct, clinically relevant, and easily comprehensible fashion. This book could be useful for practitioners seeking a quick and up-to-date reference on pharmacokinetic dosing. Although it also can be used by students, it would not be the ideal choice as the primary textbook for a clinical pharmacokinetics course. Equations and dosing considerations are clearly yet briefly outlined; more detailed explanations and practice problems may be necessary for students learning these concepts for the first time.
Features: Individual chapters cover medications with specific pharmacokinetic considerations and equations for dosing. Pharmacokinetic issues are discussed in a way that can be easily applied to clinical practice. For instance, the discussion on low molecular weight heparins addresses bioavailability and renal clearance, as well as clinically relevant concerns such as drug monitoring and reversal of anticoagulant effects. The chapter on geriatric dosing also includes a comprehensive table of specific dosing recommendations for medications in the elderly. The book succeeds not only in explaining pharmacokinetic concepts, but also in providing clinically useful information.
Assessment: This book outlines concepts in a way that is easy to read, understand, and apply in clinical practice. It would be useful for busy healthcare practitioners who wish to review or apply basic pharmacokinetic dosing concepts in practice.
The Pharmaceutical Journal - Laurence A. Goldberg

Clinical Pharmacokinetics, 5th Edition
edited by John E. Murphy.
 
The Pharmaceutical Journal; 2012; March 6th; Volume 288; Page 311
 
Laurence A. Goldberg is a pharmaceutical consultant from Bury, Lancashire


Genes are only part of the story
This book has been written to help practitioners predict drug doses to achieve target drug concentrations from doses administered to patients. Important chapters on rational use of drug concentration measurements, dosing in overweight and obese patients, dosing considerations for a wider variety of drugs used in neonatal, paediatric and geriatric patients, drug dosing in renal disease and creatinine clearance estimation complete this fifth edition. It offers information for medicines that require an understanding of individual patients’ probable or actual drug concentrations to achieve medication effectiveness and safety.
The authors have taken advantage of advances in knowledge to update the chapters. In many cases, more judicious monitoring of drug concentrations is suggested compared with the earlier editions. In some cases, the dosing approaches are radically different and, in others, new prediction approaches are available that have been tested in larger numbers of patients. Many chapters have been updated to take into account emerging pharmacogenetics knowledge.
Typically, each chapter includes the usual dose range, the bioavailability of the dose forms, general pharmacokinetic information (absorption, distribution, elimination, metabolism, protein binding), clearance, volume of distribution, half-life and time to steady state, therapeutic range, dosing strategies, sampling times, pharmacodynamic monitoring, drug-drug interactions, pharmacodynamic interactions, drug-disease interactions and references.
This book is an excellent reference source offering practitioners the key principles in pharmacokinetics and the application of these principles in drug therapy. Since the tables now comprise international and traditional units for drugs and laboratory tests, the book can be used across the world. All workers in this area of practice should have access to this fine work.
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585283477
Publisher:
ASHP
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
434
File size:
5 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

John E. Murphy, PharmD, is Professor of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Associate Dean for Academic and Professional Affairs at the College of Pharmacy, and Professor of Clinical, Family and Community Medicine at the College of Medicine, the University of Arizona in Tucson. He is also an Honorary Professor at the University of Otago School of Pharmacy in Dunedin, New Zealand. Dr. Murphy served as Head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science at the College of Pharmacy from 1991 to 2006. John received BS in pharmacy and PharmD degrees from the University of Florida in Gainesville, where he was a recipient of the Distinguished Pharmacy Alumnus Award in 1998. He spent 12 years on the faculty at Mercer University Southern School of Pharmacy in Atlanta, where he also served as Director of Pharmacokinetic Services at a 500 bed medical center.

Long active in pharmacy organizations, Dr. Murphy was president of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) in 2008-2009. He served as president (1997-1998) and member of the Board of Directors (1994-1999) of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) and as president of the Georgia Society of Hospital Pharmacists. John has been awarded fellow status in three organizations – ACCP, the American College of Clinical Pharmacology, and ASHP.

Dr. Murphy has published over 200 papers, ~ 90 abstracts, and four editions of Clinical Pharmacokinetics. John was Co-Director from 2000-2005 of the Arizona Clinical Research Training Program (AzCRTP), an NIH K30 Clinical Research Curriculum Award. His research interests include preventing drug-drug interactions, pharmacy education, and clinical pharmacokinetics. Among various professional and teaching awards received over the years, John was honored with the Award for Sustained Contributions to the Literature of Pharmacy Practice from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation in 2003.

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