Clinical Reasoning in the Health Professions / Edition 3

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Overview

Clinical reasoning is the foundation of professional clinical practice. Totally revised and updated, this book continues to provide the essential text on the theoretical basis of clinical reasoning in the health professions and examines strategies for assisting learners, scholars and clinicians develop their reasoning expertise.

• key chapters revised and updated
• nature of clinical reasoning sections have been expanded
• increase in emphasis on collaborative reasoning
• core model of clinical reasoning has been revised and updated

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

John L. VanRynen
This book attempts to describe and then present models for teaching clinical reasoning to a variety of multidisciplinary allied health students. The purpose is an attempt to describe the concept of clinical reasoning by way of presenting models, guidelines, and strategies to serve as developmental tools in attaining some measure of clinical competency in the allied health student. Targeted to allied health students in nursing, physical, and occupational therapy, this book attempts to convey how a student should think or respond in lieu of actual clinical experience. Unfortunately, it will be of little value to the beginning student. Although the authors do not imply that clinical reasoning is meant as a substitute for experience, teaching the concept of clinical reasoning is more a theory to be argued as opposed to a concrete model for its attainment. The book is divided into five sections describing the concept, scope, and approach to teaching clinical reasoning, concluding with a chapter looking toward future applications. The text is long, with few illustrations. Pertinent points are not highlighted or set apart from the body of the text in any appreciable manner. Although there are numerous references, some appear vague in relation to the text. In many instances, the authors seem to make arguments for the need for this book rather than making clear concise points. As a multicredentialed health care practitioner with many years of experience in acute care and educational settings, I believe this book will be of little value to the intended student audience. Clinical reasoning is a skill stemming from hands-on experience, not from a book that attempts to describe how one should thinkin a clinical situation. This book does not present any substantial clinical model I would find useful for my students.
Booknews
A multidisciplinary text for the health professions, with relevance across the various health disciplines. International scholars, researchers, and teachers contribute their ideas, research findings, and experiences to promote discussion on the nature and teaching of clinical reasoning. Models, guidelines, and strategies are presented. These aim to promote effective clinical reasoning in practice, creative and successful clinical reasoning learning programs, and directions for future research. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"...the proposed new model of client centred clinical reasoning that is illustrated on the cover has come as a big relief. When considering the monumental changes in approaches to health care and the consequent increasing challenge to health workers to substantiate their practice that has occurred over these five years this new emphasis is welcome. [...] ...there is a significant and refreshing new emphasis on the development of a patient centred focus in clinical reasoning. [...] The new edition of Clinical Reasoning in Health Professions presents a wide ranging review of clinical reasoning that can be of help to health professionals in beginning to grapple with these ideas of advanced reasoning."Physiotherapy, September 2000
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: John L. VanRynen, RRT, RN, CHT (Medical College of Ohio Hospitals)
Description: This book attempts to describe and then present models for teaching clinical reasoning to a variety of multidisciplinary allied health students.
Purpose: The purpose is an attempt to describe the concept of clinical reasoning by way of presenting models, guidelines, and strategies to serve as developmental tools in attaining some measure of clinical competency in the allied health student.
Audience: Targeted to allied health students in nursing, physical, and occupational therapy, this book attempts to convey how a student should think or respond in lieu of actual clinical experience. Unfortunately, it will be of little value to the beginning student. Although the authors do not imply that clinical reasoning is meant as a substitute for experience, teaching the concept of clinical reasoning is more a theory to be argued as opposed to a concrete model for its attainment.
Features: The book is divided into five sections describing the concept, scope, and approach to teaching clinical reasoning, concluding with a chapter looking toward future applications. The text is long, with few illustrations. Pertinent points are not highlighted or set apart from the body of the text in any appreciable manner. Although there are numerous references, some appear vague in relation to the text. In many instances, the authors seem to make arguments for the need for this book rather than making clear concise points.
Assessment: As a multicredentialed health care practitioner with many years of experience in acute care and educational settings, I believe this book will be of little value to the intended student audience. Clinical reasoning is a skill stemming from hands-on experience, not from a book that attempts to describe how one should think in a clinical situation. This book does not present any substantial clinical model I would find useful for my students.

1 Star from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780750688857
  • Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
  • Publication date: 2/28/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 520
  • Sales rank: 959,150
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Section 1 Clinical reasoning and clinical decision making - nature and context

1. Clinical decision making and multiple problem spaces
2. The context for clinical decision making in the 21st century
3. Clinical reasoning and models of practice
4. Collaborative decision making
5. Action and narrative: two dynamics of clinical reasoning
6. Clinical reasoning and generic thinking skills
7. Clinical reasoning and patient-centred care
8. Factors influencing clinical decision making
9. Dimensions of clinical reasoning capability

Section 2 Reasoning, Expertise and Knowledge

10. The development of clinical reasoning expertise
11. Clinical reasoning and biomedical knowledge: implications for teaching
12. Expertise and clinical reasoning
13. Knowledge, reasoning and evidence for practice
14. Knowledge generation and clinical reasoning in practice
15. Understanding knowledge as socio-cultural historical phenomenon
16. Professional practice judgement artistry

Section 3 Clinical reasoning research trends

17. Methods in the study of clinical reasoning
18. A history of clinical reasoning research
19. A place for new research directions

Section 4 Clinical reasoning and clinical decision-making approaches

20. Clinical reasoning in medicine
21. Clinical reasoning in nursing
22. Clinical reasoning in physiotherapy
23. Clinical reasoning in dentistry
24. Clinical reasoning in occupational therapy
25. Ethical reasoning
26. Multidisciplinary clinical decision making
27. Treatment decision making in the medical encounter: the case of shared decision making
28. Algorithms, clinical pathways and clinical guidelines
29. Clinical reasoning to facilitate cognitive-experiential change

Section 5 Communicating about clinical reasoning

30. Learning to communicate clinical reasoning
31. Learning the language of clinical reasoning
32. Beyond the restitution narrative: lived bodies and expert patients
33. Facilitating clinical decision making in students in intercultural fieldwork placements
34. Using decision aids to involve clients in clinical decision making

Section 6 Teaching and learning clinical reasoning

35. Teaching and learning clinical reasoning
36. Helping physiotherapy sutdents develop clincial reasoning capability
37. Speech-language pathology students: learning clinical reasoning
38. Teaching clinical reasoning in nursing education
39. Assessing clinical reasoning
40. Using simulated patients to teach clinical reasoning
41. Peer coaching to generate clinical reasoning skills
42. Using open and distance learning to develop clinical reasoning skills
43. Cultivating a thinking surgeon: using a clinical thinking pathway as a learning and assessment process
44. Teaching clinical reasoning and culture
45. Teaching clinical reasoning to medical students
46. Using case reports to teach clinical reasoning
47. Using mind mapping to improve students’ metacognition

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