Clinically Oriented Anatomy / Edition 4

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Overview

"Clinically Oriented Anatomy, Sixth Edition provides first-year medical and allied health students with the clinically oriented anatomical information that they need in study and practice. This best-selling textbook is renowned for its comprehensive coverage of anatomy, presented as it relates to the practice of medicine, dentistry, and physical therapy." "The Sixth Edition features a modified interior design with new and improved artwork that further enhances the user-friendliness of the text. The clinical Blue Boxes are now grouped to reduce interruption of text and are categorized with icons to promote easier comprehension of clinical information. The Bottom Line summaries have been refined to clearly call out key points for quick study." A companion Website offers the fully searchable text, interactive USMLE-style questions, and video animations. Online faculty resources include an Image Bank, Test Generator, and Course Outlines.

The book contains predominantly color illustrations, with some black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

John A. McNulty
This fourth edition has been extensively revised to make this popular text ""more student friendly."" The most significant and helpful revisions have been the addition of more than 500 color images, sections on surface anatomy, and additional clinical correlations. The authors' target of providing basic knowledge of the structure of the human body is nicely supplemented with an appreciation of the practical aspects of that knowledge from a clinical perspective. This is primarily written as a text for gross anatomy courses in the health sciences. It especially keeps pace with the evolving curricular demands of integrating clinical cases and vignettes to facilitate the understanding of anatomy. The organization of the book by region of the body is retained from prior editions. The introductory chapter, which provides overviews of the different systems (e.g., skeleton, cardiovascular) and a discussion of medical imaging modalities, has been greatly expanded. Many of the original, familiar images from Agur's Grant's Atlas of Anatomy (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1991) have been retained and are supplemented by new photographs and color illustrations of excellent quality. The familiar ""blue boxes"" containing relevant clinical information have been expanded both in number and in content. Other notable revisions include new medical imaging displays of MRIs and CTs as well as sections on surface anatomy. I give the book very high marks. The clarity of the writing, excellent new artwork, and expanded clinical correlations will ensure its continued success as a popular anatomy text.
Booknews
A text for a first-year course, placing emphasis on anatomy important in general practice, diagnostic radiology, emergency medicine, and general surgery. The art program features color illustrations and graphics, with many multipart illustrations combining dissections, line art, and medical images, and with displays at the end of every chapter focusing on diagnostic imaging. This fourth edition offers new artwork, plus classic figures from , and includes additional tables, boxed readings, clinical comments, and case studies. This edition provides expanded coverage of surface anatomy and medical imaging, and includes a new introduction on the nervous system. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
n/a - O. Paul Gobee
"In my opinion it's the single best anatomy work available world-wide."—O. Paul Gobee, MD, Assistant Professor, Developer Anatomical E-learning, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center
Australian Medical Student Journal - David Sparks
"The study of anatomy is often a challenging endeavour for many medical students. Central to the learning process is the use of a good textbook. Two of the most often recommended texts for medical students are Gray's Anatomy for Students (GAS), descended from the iconic text by Henry Gray, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA), by Moore, Dalley and Agur.

"Both texts employ a regional approach to the study of anatomy. GAS separates each chapter into four sections: Conceptual Overview, Regional Anatomy, Surface Anatomy and Clinical Cases. The conceptual overview aims to provide the very basic concepts of each region in a concise summary before moving on to an increasingly detailed description. While this approach may be useful for the beginner or reviewer, the inevitable repetition creates a degree of redundancy. COA presents information in a 'bones up' format, progressively adding surrounding structures before detailing the arthrology of each region. Each chapter concludes with a series of radiographic images to complement integration and understanding.

"Certain striking distinctions are evident in the textual quality of each book. GAS aims to strip away irrelevant information into an easy-to-read summation while leaving intricate details for other texts. While this provides an excellent introduction for the neophyte, COA includes more rigorous explanations concerning the finer points and the complex interaction with surrounding structures. An enlightening example of the differing styles can be observed through the treatment attributed to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. A concise, tabular description of muscular attachments, innervations and basic function is provided in GAS in association with a stylised diagram indicating its position in the neck. Conversely, COA devotes an entire four page sub-section to a detailed discussion of the manner in which body position and the use of synergist muscle groups can alter function of the SCM beyond an isolated view of the muscle acting independently in the anatomical position. Thus, while simplified to enhance the initial integration of basic concepts, GAS may simultaneously perpetuate certain erroneous notions concerning the nature of anatomical function. On the other hand, the text in COA may reduce its effectiveness for the uninitiated, while GAS may prove to be too simplistic for the interested student.
"Both books approach diagrammatical representation through the use of computer-generated imagery, though distinct dissimilarities are visible. COA depicts each region by incorporating detailed and realistic diagrams which are thoroughly labelled. In contrast, GAS represents analogous images through a distinctly stylised fashion. Major structures are portrayed in an idealistic mode, which, in combination with relatively sparse labelling, may impede practical application, particularly in medical courses focussed on anatomical dissections. However the simplified overview, devoid of extensive detail, is potentially easier to comprehend for the less experienced anatomist. In addition to detailed, accurate labels, COA consolidates diagrammatic elements through representations in various anatomical planes. The depiction of distinct layers within each system aids the appreciation of the detailed nature of such structures. Ultimately, COA associates these illustrative characteristics through the use of numerous, detailed figures within each specified anatomical region. The use of COA may prove to be beneficial, both in dissection and in providing a broader scope of understanding. "The integration of clinical aspects throughout a text is essential to the effective understanding of anatomical information. Both books appear to have achieved a relatively streamlined integration of such information through the utilisation of clinical vignettes. Complemented with relevant diagrams, topics covered in the text of these vignettes include information relating to development, anatomical variation, radiology and pathology. For those without significant exposure to anatomy, having clinical information presented in such a fashion is an ideal mode for the consolidation of vital concepts. The use of end of chapter case studies in GAS allows the reader to evaluate their own level of understanding, a feature that is absent in COA. Radiological correlations in GAS are discussed further through an in-text approach. Alternatively, COA utilises radiological imaging juxtaposed with easily understood computer generated diagrams, allowing the student to understand the concepts therein with more clarity.

"Through our experience in both learning and teaching, we believe that COA delivers a more comprehensive insight into the study of anatomy. Not only does it encompass a strong clinical foundation, it provides the reader with enhanced factual information and diagrams. Contrastingly, GAS offers equivalent aspects in a more concise, readable form yet neglects more in-depth explanations. The choice of textbook will ultimately depend on both the school curriculum and the eagerness of individual students. Whilst providing an excellent synopsis into the anatomical world, the possibility exists that students may find GAS lacking after covering the basic concepts. It is our view that COA offers greater scope for continued learning throughout medical school and beyond."—Australian Medical Student Journal

Australian Medical Student Journal

"The study of anatomy is often a challenging endeavour for many medical students. Central to the learning process is the use of a good textbook. Two of the most often recommended texts for medical students are Gray's Anatomy for Students (GAS), descended from the iconic text by Henry Gray, and Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA), by Moore, Dalley and Agur.

"Both texts employ a regional approach to the study of anatomy. GAS separates each chapter into four sections: Conceptual Overview, Regional Anatomy, Surface Anatomy and Clinical Cases. The conceptual overview aims to provide the very basic concepts of each region in a concise summary before moving on to an increasingly detailed description. While this approach may be useful for the beginner or reviewer, the inevitable repetition creates a degree of redundancy. COA presents information in a 'bones up' format, progressively adding surrounding structures before detailing the arthrology of each region. Each chapter concludes with a series of radiographic images to complement integration and understanding.

"Certain striking distinctions are evident in the textual quality of each book. GAS aims to strip away irrelevant information into an easy-to-read summation while leaving intricate details for other texts. While this provides an excellent introduction for the neophyte, COA includes more rigorous explanations concerning the finer points and the complex interaction with surrounding structures. An enlightening example of the differing styles can be observed through the treatment attributed to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. A concise, tabular description of muscular attachments, innervations and basic function is provided in GAS in association with a stylised diagram indicating its position in the neck. Conversely, COA devotes an entire four page sub-section to a detailed discussion of the manner in which body position and the use of synergist muscle groups can alter function of the SCM beyond an isolated view of the muscle acting independently in the anatomical position. Thus, while simplified to enhance the initial integration of basic concepts, GAS may simultaneously perpetuate certain erroneous notions concerning the nature of anatomical function. On the other hand, the text in COA may reduce its effectiveness for the uninitiated, while GAS may prove to be too simplistic for the interested student.

"Both books approach diagrammatical representation through the use of computer-generated imagery, though distinct dissimilarities are visible. COA depicts each region by incorporating detailed and realistic diagrams which are thoroughly labelled. In contrast, GAS represents analogous images through a distinctly stylised fashion. Major structures are portrayed in an idealistic mode, which, in combination with relatively sparse labelling, may impede practical application, particularly in medical courses focussed on anatomical dissections. However the simplified overview, devoid of extensive detail, is potentially easier to comprehend for the less experienced anatomist. In addition to detailed, accurate labels, COA consolidates diagrammatic elements through representations in various anatomical planes. The depiction of distinct layers within each system aids the appreciation of the detailed nature of such structures. Ultimately, COA associates these illustrative characteristics through the use of numerous, detailed figures within each specified anatomical region. The use of COA may prove to be beneficial, both in dissection and in providing a broader scope of understanding.

"The integration of clinical aspects throughout a text is essential to the effective understanding of anatomical information. Both books appear to have achieved a relatively streamlined integration of such information through the utilisation of clinical vignettes. Complemented with relevant diagrams, topics covered in the text of these vignettes include information relating to development, anatomical variation, radiology and pathology. For those without significant exposure to anatomy, having clinical information presented in such a fashion is an ideal mode for the consolidation of vital concepts. The use of end of chapter case studies in GAS allows the reader to evaluate their own level of understanding, a feature that is absent in COA. Radiological correlations in GAS are discussed further through an in-text approach. Alternatively, COA utilises radiological imaging juxtaposed with easily understood computer generated diagrams, allowing the student to understand the concepts therein with more clarity.

"Through our experience in both learning and teaching, we believe that COA delivers a more comprehensive insight into the study of anatomy. Not only does it encompass a strong clinical foundation, it provides the reader with enhanced factual information and diagrams. Contrastingly, GAS offers equivalent aspects in a more concise, readable form yet neglects more in-depth explanations. The choice of textbook will ultimately depend on both the school curriculum and the eagerness of individual students. Whilst providing an excellent synopsis into the anatomical world, the possibility exists that students may find GAS lacking after covering the basic concepts. It is our view that COA offers greater scope for continued learning throughout medical school and beyond."—Australian Medical Student Journal

— David Sparks, Gareth S. Davies, and Ashwarya Nath, All First Year Medicine (Grad

O. Paul Gobee
In my opinion it's the single best anatomy work available world-wide. (O. Paul Gobee, MD, Assistant Professor, Developer Anatomical E-learning, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center)
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Mark Jaffe, DPM, MHSA (Nova Southeastern University)
Description: In this sixth edition of a detailed textbook of regional anatomy, the authors carefully juxtapose clinical correlates with normal functional anatomy. This edition updates and improves upon the content and layout of the 2005 edition.
Purpose: "The primary purpose is to provide a comprehensive resource for students to help close the gap created by the reduction in time devoted to formal anatomy teaching in medical and allied health programs. There is obviously a vital role for an authoritative textbook of clinical anatomy to help students progress beyond memorization to clinical application, and this book meets the authors' objectives. "
Audience: The intended audience is beginning health science students even if they have not been exposed to anatomy previously. However, the book's detail may be more than first-year medical students or allied health students need during their introductory anatomy course. That said, upper level medical and allied health students will find this an excellent resource to prepare them for physical diagnosis and diagnostic imaging interpretation. The first editor, Keith L. Moore, is well known and respected in this area. He has previously teamed with Arthur F. Dalley, and for this edition, has added Anne M. R. Agur as an additional coauthor.
Features: The introductory chapter provides a brief systemic overview of anatomy, including basic terminology, which prepares readers for the regional anatomy chapters. Those chapters combine a plethora of color illustrations with the detailed text descriptions. Color-coded tables are strategically located throughout each chapter. The popular clinical "Blue Boxes" are grouped together toward the end of each chapter. Each chapter concludes with "The Bottom Line" summary of salient facts. The book includes access to a student companion website, which gives students the ability to search the entire contents of the book and access to USMLE-style case studies and quizzes. Not surprisingly, neuroanatomy is the weakest area, although the final chapter (chapter 9) is a summary review of the cranial nerves.
Assessment: This is an excellent anatomy reference and it provides the resources to expand one's mastery of the subject. However, it may be more detailed than introductory students need. Gray's Anatomy for Students, 2nd Edition, Drake et al. (Elsevier, 2010), would be a better required text for novice anatomy students. Overall, this new edition improves upon the fifth edition with better artwork and the use of a more student-friendly layout. By incorporating insights from students, anatomists, and clinicians, the authors have made what was already an excellent clinical anatomy textbook an even better one.

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780683061413
  • Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
  • Publication date: 4/28/1999
  • Edition description: Fourth Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1164
  • Product dimensions: 8.32 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 1.74 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction to clinically oriented anatomy
Thorax
Abdomen
Pelvis and perineum
Back
Lower limb
Upper limb
Head
Neck
Summary of cranial nerves
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2004

    Good Golly Miss Molly!!

    One of the best reference books for anatomy out there. I personally like the pictures a lot better than Gray's Anatomy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2003

    One of the best.

    If you are looking for a book on basic anatomy, then you'll like this one. It is laid out well and just perfect as a handy reference. I bought this book while in physical therapy school and still use it to this day.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2004

    i love this book

    when i went to the medical school, the most difficult subject was anatomy. i got gyton for physio and lippincot for biochem. but could not find some suitable book for anatomy. last was too boring and difficult, and snell too short. than i found klm and anatomy became my favourite subject. its the most beautiful and easy to read book on anatomy. you need atlas for anatomy and i think its the only book with atlas pictures. than it is clinically very interesting with good clinical references. so if you are new in medicine and having trouble with anatomy this book is for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2003

    Outstanding for Clinical Intro of Anatomy for students preparing for Medical School.

    As an undergraduate majoring in Biology, i have had a great opportunity to be introduced to human anatomy with cadavers. Many students do not have that opportunity until medical school. This book helps tremendously in each region. Understanding relationships and clinical studies of anatomy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2002

    A must for med students in anatomy

    Excellent text, interesting clinical correlates, good illustrations. I used primarily this and Gray's Anatomy to study while Netter's collected dust. Be aware that some of Moore's anatomy differs from Gray's and thus you may find discrepancies between the book and the lectures.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2002

    Well i was studying for the usmle

    well i am also a med student here in Recife in the north east part of brasil and believe it or not this is the book that we use there .. i mean here ..hehe so that is why i dont even have much to say where even a school from brasil already heard of the book itself..

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2001

    very good

    The book contains everything you could ever need or want to know about the human body, this is a must for any medical student.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2000

    Quite good.

    You can't fault it on the content, but its not easy to find what you want when there is so much presented. Excellent diagrams.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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