Clink

( 2 )

Overview

Clink was a state-of-the-art robot with the dazzling ability to make toast and play music at the same time. But that was many years ago.

Now kids want snazzier robots who do things like play baseball and bake cookies. So day after day, Clink sits on a shelf and sadly watches as his friends leave with their new owners. He almost gives up on ever finding a home—until the day Clink spies a boy who just might be able to be the right one for him. . ...

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Overview

Clink was a state-of-the-art robot with the dazzling ability to make toast and play music at the same time. But that was many years ago.

Now kids want snazzier robots who do things like play baseball and bake cookies. So day after day, Clink sits on a shelf and sadly watches as his friends leave with their new owners. He almost gives up on ever finding a home—until the day Clink spies a boy who just might be able to be the right one for him. . . .

From #1 New York Times bestselling author Kelly DiPucchio and new talent Matthew Myers comes a funny and heartwarming story that lovers of Corduroy will adore.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Though this is his picture book debut, illustrator Myers's vision of the robot Clink's world is fully developed. It's a place where toy stores sell shiny, talented robots who do homework and make chocolate chip cookies, while the chunky outdated robot Clink—much cuter than the others, of course, with a toaster head and blocky red feet—only plays music and makes toast. Kids line up for the cookie-making robots and wave lonely Clink's burnt toast away: "He hadn't been programmed to cry, but somehow he leaked rusty tears every time." Finally, a boy named Milton appears, who "likes burned toast, is great at fixing things, and... loves to dance." DiPucchio's (Grace for President) text percolates with plenty of humor, and the inevitability of the plot provides security for smaller readers. Myers has a wonderful time drawing gems like the victim of Clink's disastrous haircuts (the unfortunate girl looks like a trimmed hedge) and the polka-dot underpants a fellow robot offers to Clink as consolation. Extra marks for the distinctive combination of geek elements with a dash of sentimentality. Ages 4–7. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Sylvia Firth
Once Clink was a shiny new up-to-date toy robot, but now he sat on the store shelf rusted, dusty and totally out of date. All of the other robot toys can do marvelous things, such as cutting hair, baking cookies, doing homework and even playing baseball. All Clink could do was make toast and play music. No one cared about those skills. As time went by, many of the robots went home with happy boys and girls and Clink grew sadder and sadder. One day a boy named Milton came into the shop and looked at all the robots but did not care for any of them. As he turned to leave, Milton pulled out his harmonica and began to play. Something stirred in Clink. His old gears began to turn as he stood up and "belted out a head-boppin', toast-poppin', showstoppin' tune." Milton was delighted. But then a rusted spring popped out and hit him in the forehead. The store's owner quickly gathered up Clink and headed toward the trashcan. Milton decided he wanted Clink, so he took him home, repaired his broken parts and the two became fast friends. The bold, cartoon-like illustrations add greatly to the story as they show the actions of the robots and the reactions of the children. Put this on the first purchase list and use it at story time with Corduroy by Don Freeman. Reviewer: Sylvia Firth
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—This predictable story is another addition to the genre of toys/animals that languish in a store unappreciated until the right child comes along to claim them. Clink is an old-fashioned robot collecting dust and rust in a store full of newer and flashier machines. While the other bots can do amazing things like pick up dirty laundry while playing baseball, give people outlandish hairstyles, and help kids with their homework while baking chocolate chip cookies, all Clink can do is play old music and make burnt toast. As in other tales of this ilk, it looks as if no one will ever want him, but at last the right child shows up. Myers's exaggerated illustrations of people and gadgets follow the text but do not extend it, and the protagonist is not charming enough to endear himself to young readers. Skip this clunker in favor of Don Freeman's Corduroy (Viking, 1968).—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061929281
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/5/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 273,936
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Kelly DiPucchio is the author of numerous children's books, including the New York Times bestselling Grace for President. She also wrote Dinosnores, What's the Magic Word?, and Bed Hogs. Kelly lives in southeastern Michigan with her husband and three children.

Matthew Myers was created in rural Oregon. After being programmed in fine arts and graphic arts at the Museum Art School in Portland, he functioned quite satisfactorily for twenty years as an advertising art director. He now paints and illustrates in Brooklyn, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2011

    I Heart Robots

    Who could not love Clink with his toaster head and retro-radio torso? A lot of people, apparently, as he languishes in the store while super-clever creations wow the customers. The illustrations take the reader well beyond the text and give both adults and children plenty to chuckle about. You should get plenty of repeat readings out of this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    Nhjhhh

    Bhggdghftffgrhftiifgyhhgg

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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