Clio in the Classroom: A Guide for Teaching U. S. Women's History

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Overview

Over the last four decades, women's history has developed from a new and marginal approach to history to an established and flourishing area of the discipline taught in all history departments.

Clio in the Classroom makes accessible the content, key themes and concepts, and pedagogical techniques of U.S. women's history for all secondary school and college teachers. Editors Carol Berkin, Margaret S. Crocco, and Barbara Winslow have brought together a diverse group of educators to provide information and tools for those who are constructing a new syllabus or revitalizing an existing one. The essays in this volume provide concise, up-to-date overviews of American women's history from colonial times to the present that include its ethnic, racial, and regional changes. They look at conceptual frameworks key to understanding women's history and American history, such as sexuality, citizenship, consumerism, and religion. And they offer concrete approaches for the classroom, including the use of oral history, visual resources, material culture, and group learning. The volume also features a guide to print and digital resources for further information.

This is an invaluable guide for women and men preparing to incorporate the study of women into their classes, as well as for those seeking fresh perspectives for their teaching.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Ranging across time and topic, Berkin, Crocco, and Winslow have assembled an immensely useful collection of essays that will allow teachers new to the subject on any level—as well as some of us old hands—to refine their pedagogy and bring the study of U.S. women into the history curriculum in innovative and exciting ways. No one interested in teacher education and concerned with how we learn history can ignore this work."—Eileen Boris, co-editor of The Practice of U.S. Women's History: Narratives, Intersections, and Dialogues

"Clio in the Classroom: A Guide for Teaching U.S. Women's History is an invaluable resource for both high school and college instructors.... It is a starting point and a must have for the novice instructor, and a springboard for discussion and course enrichment for others."—Jennifer Aerts Terry, The History Teacher

"A wonderful resource...Partly historiography and partly a DIY course manual, Clio in the Classroom will appeal to both American history generalists and American women's history specialists." —History Matters, a publication of the National Council for History Education

"Central to the discussion of the place of women's history in the curriculum." —TeachingHistory.org

"A first-rate guide for high school and college teachers...the prose in each chapter is carefully crafted in clear, succinct language, and the editors have done a superior job of making sure the ideas in each of the chapters connect to the overall purpose of the book." —Theory and Research in Social Education

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195320138
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 2/2/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Carol Berkin is Presidential Professor of History at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Margaret S. Crocco is a Professor of Social Studies and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Barbara Winslow is an Associate Professor in the School of Education and Womens Studies Program at Brooklyn College.

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Table of Contents

Part I: Three Eras of U.S. Women's History
1. Women in Colonial and Revolutionary America, Carol Berkin (Baruch College and the CUNY Graduate Center)
2. Women in Nineteenth Century America, Cindy Lobel (Lehman College)
3. Women in Twentieth Century America, Barbara Winslow (Brooklyn College)
Part Two: Conceptualizing Issues in U.S. Women's History
4. Conceptualizing U.S. Women's History through the History of Medicine, Rebecca Tannenbaum (Yale University)
5. Conceptualizing U.S. Women's History through the History of Sexuality, Christy Regenhardt (George Washington University)
6. Conceptualizing Citizenship in U.S. Women's History, Christine Compston (Western Washington University)
7. Conceptualizing U.S. Women's History through Consumerism, Jennifer Scanlon (Bowdoin College)
8. Conceptualizing U.S. Women's History in Medicine, Law, and Business, The Challenge of Success
9. Conceptualizing the Intersectionality of Race, Class, and Gender in U.S. Women's History, Erica Ball (California State University, Fullerton)
10. Conceptualizing the Female World of Religion in U.S. Women's History, Barbara Welter (Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center)
11. Conceptualizing Radicalism in U.S. Women's History, Ronald G. Walters (Johns Hopkins University)
12. Thinking Globally about US Women's History, Mary Frederickson (Miami University of Ohio)
Part Three: Teaching and Learning Women's History: Strategies and Resources
13. Re-designing the U.S. Women's History Survey Course Using Feminist Pedagogy, Educational Research, and New Technologies, Michael Lewis Goldberg (University of Washington, Bothell)
14. Teaching Women's History with Visual Images, Tracy Weis (Millersville University)
15. History You Can Touch: Teaching Women's History through Three- Dimensional Objects, Anne Derousie and Vivien Rose (Women's Rights National Historical Park)
16, Teaching Women's History through Oral History. Margaret S. Crocco (Teachers College, Columbia University)
17. Who is Teaching Women's History? "Insight," "Objectivity," and Identity, Nicholas Syrett (University of Northern Colorado)
Part Four: What We Know (and Don't Know) about Teaching Women's History
18. What Educational Research Says about Teaching and Learning Women's History, Linda Levstik (University of Kentucky)
Additional Resources

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