Clio Wired: The Future of the Past in the Digital Age [NOOK Book]

Overview

In these visionary essays, Roy Rosenzweig charts the impact of new media on teaching, researching, preserving, presenting, and understanding history. Negotiating between the "cyberenthusiasts" who champion technological breakthroughs and the "digitalskeptics" who fear the end of traditional humanistic scholarship, Rosenzweig re-envisions academic historians' practices and professional rites while analyzing and advocating for amateur historians' achievements.

While he addresses ...

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Clio Wired: The Future of the Past in the Digital Age

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Overview

In these visionary essays, Roy Rosenzweig charts the impact of new media on teaching, researching, preserving, presenting, and understanding history. Negotiating between the "cyberenthusiasts" who champion technological breakthroughs and the "digitalskeptics" who fear the end of traditional humanistic scholarship, Rosenzweig re-envisions academic historians' practices and professional rites while analyzing and advocating for amateur historians' achievements.

While he addresses the perils of "doing history" online, Rosenzweig eloquently identifies the promises of digital work, detailing innovative strategies for powerful searches in primary and secondary sources, the increased opportunities for dialogue and debate, and, most of all, the unprecedented access afforded by the Internet. Rosenzweig draws attention to the opening up of the historical record to new voices, the availability of documents and narratives to new audiences, and the attractions of digital technologies for new and diverse practitioners. Though he celebrates digital history's democratizing influences, Rosenzweig also argues that we can only ensure the future of the past in this digital age by actively resisting the efforts of corporations to put up gates and profit from the Web.

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Editorial Reviews

Archival Issues
For the archivist, these essays ask provocative questions and point to some interesting opportunities, both for repositories and users.

— Christine D'Arpa

Archival Issues - Christine D'Arpa
For the archivist, these essays ask provocative questions and point to some interesting opportunities, both for repositories and users.
Journal of American History
teachers esepcially should welcome this collection
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231521710
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 9/22/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 930,167
  • File size: 986 KB

Meet the Author

Roy Rosenzweig (1950-2007) was professor of history and founder of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Author of several books, including The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life (with David Thelen), and director of digital history projects, such as History Matters and the September 11th Digital Archive, he received the Richard W. Lyman Award (presented by the National Humanities Center and the Rockefeller Foundation) for "outstanding achievement in the use of information technology to advance scholarship and teaching in the humanities."

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Roy Rosenzweig: Scholarship as Community, by Anthony GraftonNote to Readers, by Deborah Kaplan

Rethinking History in New Media 1. Scarcity or Abundance? Preserving the Past2. Web of Lies? Historical Knowledge on the Internet, with Daniel J. Cohen3. Wikipedia: Can History Be Open Source?

Practicing History in New Media: Teaching, Researching, Presenting, Collecting 4. Historians and Hypertext: Is It More Than Hype?, with Steve Brier5. Rewiring the History and Social Studies Classroom: Needs, Frameworks, Dangers, Proposals, with Randy Bass6. The Riches of Hypertext for Scholarly Journals7. Should Historical Scholarship Be Free? 8. Collecting History Online

Surveying History in New Media 9. Brave New World or Blind Alley? American History on the World Wide Web, with Michael O'Malley10. Wizards, Bureaucrats, Warriors, and Hackers: Writing the History of the Internet11. The Road to Xanadu: Public and Private Pathways on the History Web

AcknowledgmentsNotesIndex

Columbia University Press

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