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Cloaked in Red
     

Cloaked in Red

4.0 8
by Vivian Vande Velde, Laural Merlington (Read by)
 

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So you think you know the story of Little Red Riding Hood, the girl with the unfortunate name and the inability to tell the difference between her grandmother and a member of a different species? Well, then, try your hand at answering these questions:

Which character (not including Little Red herself) is the most fashion challenged?

Who (not including the wolf

Overview

So you think you know the story of Little Red Riding Hood, the girl with the unfortunate name and the inability to tell the difference between her grandmother and a member of a different species? Well, then, try your hand at answering these questions:

Which character (not including Little Red herself) is the most fashion challenged?

Who (not including the wolf) is the scariest?

Who (not including Granny) is the most easily scared?

Who is the strangest? (Notice we’re not “not including” anyone, because they’re all a little off.)

Who (no fair saying “the author”) has stuffing for brains?

Vivian Vande Velde has taken eight new looks at one of the world’s most beloved (and mixed-up) stories. You may never look at fairy tales in quite the same way again.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - Audio
Gr 7–10—"Little Red Riding Hood" may be one of the best known fairy tales, but not the best written by any means. Velde expands on this premise, pointing out that in the original tale the characters are never named and are not exceptionally memorable, no vivid setting is used, and the plot is not especially exciting. She explains her purpose in a tongue-in-cheek introductory note, pointing out some of the basic flaws of the tale. She also notes that the original tale is probably too "strange and disturbing" to be shared with children. These problems inspired her to tell eight new versions of the story (Amazon Children's Pub., 2011). The only things her twisted fairy tales have in common with the original are the basic characters and the red hooded cloak. For example, in the first story, the woodcutter is the unsavory character, trying to steal the coveted red cloak, and the girl is saved by the wolf. In another version, the grandmother turns into a werewolf. Listeners will be thoroughly entertained by these stories with their twists, turns, and unexpected endings. A few of these tales seem to end too quickly. Laura Merlington does a great job of voicing the various characters in each tale. Listeners will enjoy all the clever plots.—Sheila Acosta, Cody Library, San Antonio, TX
Stephanie Zvirin
After gleefully ripping giant holes in the fabric of the familiar “Little Red Riding Hood” (“We’ll just call our youngest daughter after an article of clothing”), Vande Velde, the Edgar Award–winning author, offers eight quirky versions of her own. LRRH isn’t always the main character in these “once upon a time” yarns, which blend wry contemporary commentary with fractured-fairy-tale elements, quirky horror, and a subtle bit of...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781469214900
Publisher:
Brilliance Audio
Publication date:
10/09/2012
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 6.50(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
12 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Vivian Vande Velde started writing to avoid housework and has authored more than twenty books. She and her husband, Jim, the parents of one grown daughter, live in Rochester, New York.

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Cloaked in Red 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was my first vivian vande velde book, and i loved it. Very amusing and enjiyable to read.
smg5775 24 days ago
8 short stories that are variations of Little Red Riding Hood. Imaginative and thought provoking. I liked the fresh look of the story and how the villain is not always the wolf.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
Some fairy tales are just problematic. Rumpelstiltskin's motivations are fuzzy at best. Does Rapunzel's mother really need lettuce that badly? Then you have Little Red Riding Hood. How oblivious can one child be? Why was she left unsupervised in the woods? Why a red hood at all? Many questions. Not so many answers. Plenty of opportunities for new retellings in Cloaked in Red (2010) by Vivian Vande Velde. This collection runs in the same vein as Vande Velde's earlier collection The Rumpelstiltskin Problem. An author's note starts the volume in which Vande Velde outlines the numerous problems with the original Little Red Riding Hood. In the eight stories in this collection Vande Velde offers a different slant on the story. "Little Red Riding Hood's Family" offers a very clever, whimsical explanation of why Little Red would not be concerned to find her grandmother looking like a wolf. "Granny and the Wolf" delves deeper into the relationship between Granny and the woodcutter (not to mention the wolf). "Deems the Woodcutter" is a delightful story about a myopic woodcutter who misguidedly helps quite a few familiar fairy tale characters while out gathering wood. While this collection ignores some of the darker undertones of the Perrault* version of the story--and only nods to the Grimm version in "Why Willy and His Borther Won't Ever Amount to Anything" without mentioning Perrault at all--the collection is solid with a range of stories to appeal to readers of every age and persuasion. With a snappy tone and amusing starts to every story along the lines of "Once upon a time, before department stores and designer labels . . ." Cloaked in Red is filled with stories that are approachable and fun. This would be a great collection to pair with picture book versions of Little Red Riding Hood, to read aloud, or even to use as a primer on short story writing. *The moral from the Perrault story is as follows: "Children, especially attractive, well bred young ladies, should never talk to strangers, for if they should do so, they may well provide dinner for a wolf. I say "wolf," but there are various kinds of wolves. There are also those who are charming, quiet, polite, unassuming, complacent, and sweet, who pursue young women at home and in the streets. And unfortunately, it is these gentle wolves who are the most dangerous ones of all." It's safe to say the moral is hinting at a bit more than actual wolves. Possible Pairings: Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine, The Curiosities by Tessa Gratton, Maggie Stiefvater and Brenna Yovanoff, The Hero’s Guide to Saving Your Kingdom by Christopher Healy, Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones, Enchanted by Alethea Kontis, The Rumpelstiltskin Problem by Vivian Vande Velde
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
That cover. Anyway this was interesting with different takes on Red Riding Hood or similar in theme, etc. Interesting none the less.
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