Clockwork Orange
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Clockwork Orange

4.5 33
by Anthony Burgess, Tom Hollander
     
 

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A vicious fifteen-year-old droog is the central character of this 1963 classic. In Anthony Burgess's nightmare vision of the future, where the criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a

Overview

A vicious fifteen-year-old droog is the central character of this 1963 classic. In Anthony Burgess's nightmare vision of the future, where the criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. And when the state undertakes to reform Alex to "redeem" him, the novel asks, "At what cost?"

This edition includes the controversial last chapter not published in the first edition and Burgess's introduction "A Clockwork Orange Resucked."

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

After his youthful adventures of raping and pillaging, Alex finds himself in prison. When he volunteers for an experiment, his sentence is commuted to two weeks. The experiment leaves him physically incapable of doing wrong and releases him back into the world. However, when he repeatedly runs into people he has wronged in the past, his real suffering begins. This audiobook gives new life to Burgess's tale of recklessly violent youth, free will and true redemption. While Malcolm McDowell forever infused viewers with the look of Alex in the film, Tom Hollander performs an even more amazing feat. With a smooth, almost lyrical, crisp voice, Hollander delivers Burgess's "nadsat" dialect to readers with such rhythmic cadence that listeners will easily understand the extensive slang used throughout the book. This unabridged production also includes the 21st chapter, which was not dramatized in the film or in the book's original U.S. publication. The audiobook opens with a brief note by Burgess on living with the book's legacy. The final CD features selected readings by Burgess from a previous recorded abridged version. While it's interesting to hear the older and gruffer voice, it does not compare to Hollander's performance. A Penguin paperback. (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
The New York Times
Anthony Burgess reads chapters of his novel A Clockwork Orange with hair-raising drive and energy. Although it is a fantasy set in an Orwellian future, this is anything but a bedtime story.
William S. Burroughs
“I do not know of any other writer who has done as much with language as Mr. Burgess has done here — the fact that this is also a very funny book may pass unnoticed.”
Time
“Looks like a nasty little shocker, but is really that rare thing in English letters: a philosophical novel.”
New York Times
“A brilliant novel... a savage satire on the distortions of the single and collective minds.”
Roald Dahl
“A terrifying and marvelous book.”
Irvine Welsh
“One of the most groundbreaking and influential novels of all time—and one of the best.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061170621
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/12/2007
Edition description:
Unabridged, 8 Hours, 7 CD's
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 5.70(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are saying about this

Roald Dahl
A terrifying and marvelous book.
Roald Dahl
A terrifying and marvelous book.
—(Roald Dahl)
William S. Burroughs
I do not know of any other writer who has done as much with language as Mr. Burgess has done here—the fact that this is also a very funny book may pass unnoticed.
—(William S. Burroughs)
Irvine Welsh
One of the most groundbreaking and influential novels of all time—and one of the best.

Meet the Author

Anthony Burgess is the author of many works, including The Long Day Wanes, The Wanting Seed, The Doctor Is Sick, Nothing Like the Sun, Honey for the Bears, and Re Joyce.

Tom Hollander has starred in such films as Gosford Park, Pride and Prejudice, Possession, Pirates of the Caribbean 2 and 3, as well as on Broadway and the West End.

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A Clockwork Orange (Norton Critical Edition) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
ShayBishop More than 1 year ago
Have you ever read a book in which the first page made you close it up and never set eyes on it again? If so, you may have been taking the time to attempt reading A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. However, if you are curious, as I am, you may have continued on in hopes that you may warm up to the novel. The initial deal breaker of the novel would be Burgess’s usage of a language known as Nadsat. In the novel, it is said to be spoken by the younger generation in the times in which the book was written in. If you choose to delve into the novel and give it a fair chance, you will learn to understand and love the language of Nadsat which is used throughout the entire story. I, though being skeptical at first, grew to love A Clockwork Orange and the various messages it conveyed. It showed life from a different perspective. By holding Alex’s hand throughout the story, you get a vivid story of what life was like for an extremely violent young teen of his time. You get to see what was viewed to be just punishment for such like one and what its true affect can have. You’ll learn to love and hate Alex as you enter this rollercoaster of events that are never likely and to be expected. I give Anthony Burgess two thumbs up for his bravery in presenting to the public a novel that is like no other. He wasn’t afraid to stand out or have his writing rejected. He knew that some would like it and most would not. I say A Clockwork Orange is one of the best books I have ever read; and, on an easy day like today, I will take the tie to crack the book open and dive in again!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
A Clockwork Orange is one the most important books ever written. It is a strange, yet accurate vision of the future. Alex, a juvenile delinquent, is attacked by his partners in crime, and left there to be sent to prison. The last half of Part 2 and Part 3 is what happens during Alex's aversion therapy, and after prison. This is the best part of the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For some time, I have been hunting down the American Version that Stanley Kubrick read and made into a movie. Unfortunately, I only have England's Version, no matter it's still great. Like a punch in the gut, this book is hard to take in but once the book nears it's purpose, we see the meaning of the words that were written. This is the 'Citizen Kane' of novels.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i read the book and then watched the movie and i agree the movie doesnt quite give the book justice, especially the 21st chapter which is not a part of the movie. however Kubrick is a mastermind and his movies are amazing, it just so happens that Burgess is an incredible author
Guest More than 1 year ago
Anthony Burgess wrote the book and Stanley Kubrick directed the movie. And the book is more disturbing than the movie, mostly because Kubrick couldn¿t get away with some of the stuff in the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Burgess was, largely, a Joycean. Unlike Joyce, however, Burgess managed to avoid pretensity and egoism and come out as far more coherent in his fiction, allowing the reader to think about the philosophical and political points shown. Burgess is an author who, if you read for allegory, will never spoonfeed you any information at all, but rather show you what his point is. Or, atleast, that's the way a Clockwork Orange is written. Even though Nadsat (a watered down and minced version of Russian) is difficult to comprehend at first, the language becomes, surprisingly, easy to understand the farther you get into the novel. It was the slang itself, actually, that makes the book a satisfying read, making you feel smarter, like you rose above this great challenge, by the time you reach the back-cover. I read the book before I saw the movie, which, to me atleast, was not dissapointing at all. If you have not seen the movie yet, read the book first--you won't regret it. Don't let the violence of a Clockwork Orange make you think this is just some justification, or glorification, of gang warfare and other various forms of violence and moral atrophy. This is not the point of the novel or the movie. In fact, look a bit closer, and you'll find a deep, philosophical argument criticising violence in all of its forms, as well as 'evil' but, at the same time, acknowledging free will and feeling glad such a thing exists. Atleast, this is what I got out of both the book and movie, despite the movie leaving out the most important chapter of our young Droog's adventure through morality. I loved a Clockwork Orange, and, on some days, wish I would have written it instead. But then again, it was so fun reading it, writing it might have sucked out some of the fun... Recommended, atleast by me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i'm an avid 13 year old reader and this is the best book ever.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A Clockwork Orange is the best book that I have ever read and I don't even like to read. It is so full of political satires and horrifying ideas that actually became true. A great book for any seeker of freewill, government control and what our government has become.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Once I started reading it I couldn't put it down, by far it is the best book I have ever read. I wanted to just jump into the story and lend Alex a helping hand, how could someone not feel bad for him, he screwed up but that procedure was terrible, but the irony of finding what his droogs have become and finding the cottage where he had been before.Not to mention the use of laguage, most of my friends have only read maybe the first chapter but no more due to the fact of the russian slang getting to be too much, but I got used to it after awhile and found the book very intriguing. Over the coarse of the tale I gues you could say that I had fallen in love with the 'humble narrator', his story was so tragic yet compelling and all at the same time. He didn't know any better espically in a city ruled by crime, an unfair fate not by jail but more so by the special 'programme'. Over all an excellant book I would recommend to anyone.