The Clone Republic [NOOK Book]

Overview

Earth, 2508 A.D. Humans have spread across the six arms of the Milky Way Galaxy. The Unified Authority controls Earth’s colonies with an iron fist and a powerful military—a military made up almost entirely of clones…

Private first-class Wayson Harris was raised in a U.A. orphanage among thousands of clones born and bred to be the ultimate soldiers. But Harris isn’t like the other Marines: he has a mind of his own. He figures he’s paying for ...
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The Clone Republic

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Overview

Earth, 2508 A.D. Humans have spread across the six arms of the Milky Way Galaxy. The Unified Authority controls Earth’s colonies with an iron fist and a powerful military—a military made up almost entirely of clones…

Private first-class Wayson Harris was raised in a U.A. orphanage among thousands of clones born and bred to be the ultimate soldiers. But Harris isn’t like the other Marines: he has a mind of his own. He figures he’s paying for that independent streak when his first assignment out of boot camp is the smallest Marine outpost in the whole U.A.

When a rogue general surfaces, the remote desert world Harris thought was a dead-end posting becomes anything but. Fighting off the general’s raid gains Harris a promotion. But it also brings him to the attention of some unfriendly U.A. leaders. They have their own plans for the military—plans Harris disrupts by his very existence. For in an army of clones, the one unforgivable sin is to be different…






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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440623042
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Series: Clone , #1
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 148,410
  • File size: 498 KB

Meet the Author

Born in California but raised in Hawaii, novelist/video game fanatic Steven L. Kent turned a life-long joystick addiction into a 15-year gig writing for publications like MSNBC, Boy’s Life, USA Today, Chicago Tribune, and Japan Times. After publishing the 600-page The Ultimate History of Video Games, Kent satisfied his Pac-Man-angst and set his sights on fiction. Having just submitted The Clone Elite, the fourth book in his “Wayson Harris Trilogy,” Kent is currently writing a standalone sci-fi novel while he develops a new series based on the Unified Authority.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
Rating Distribution

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(15)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 11, 2012

    I was first intrigued just by the title alone; the cool picture

    I was first intrigued just by the title alone; the cool picture on the cover added to my curiosity. I picked it up and started reading it. The style of writing was very captivating and easy to read. He had me in the very first paragraph. My rule of thumb is in order for me to read a book from a new author, he has to have written a least a trilogy. I was very pleased to see that an entire series based on this character, Wayson Harris. So I decided to give it a try.

    Within three hours I had devoured the entire book. The inter-weaving of story lines, detail description of the future universe, character development, shocking twists in the plot, simplicity but captivating writing style, unique and realistic sci-fi development enthralled me.
    Not since reading Stephen Brust (Vlad Taltos) or Simeon R. Green (Deathstalker) had I been so pleased with the decision to read this new author. My all time favorite author Orson Scott Card would not be disappointed with Stephen Kent's work.

    I quickly went to B/N and purchased the entire series. I am sharing it with my 17 year old son. He reads faster than I do, but I get dibs on the books so he will steal my copy, keeping my bookmark carefully in place, and read ahead of me. He loves it too. I have added this series to my top ten all time favorites. Please give it a try, you'll be glad you did.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Overall a great effort. A galaxy-hopping military action adventure.

    This is a good first book of a trilogy that sets the stage fairly well for the next two. The main character is a clone, but does not know it when the book starts. He learns that this is the case, and that he is a different kind of clone from the other Marines. This becomes very important later in the series.

    I was left a little skeptical that an admiral would extend such favorable treatment to a clone, even given the stated basis for that treatment. He does not treat him as a 'son', nor quite as a protege. Kent could have made it more plausible with more development.

    One thing I especially appreciated was that the author did not waste time with detailed, fanciful explanations about how FTL or gates work, how galaxy-wide instantaneous communication is achieved, nor how clones are made. It is just THERE and provides the venue and backdrop for the story. Some of the 'science' is actually quite fanciful, but, because he does not attempt to explain it, it just becomes color for the story. Nicely done.

    The one lingering disappointment is the unresolved question about the status of clones: Are they just manufactured, consumable supplies, like bullets or other material of war, or are they human also, with rights and status before God? Kent presumes to speak for all major religions by declaring through their imagined future magisteria that clones are not human. He seems not to have listened to the Pope's recent declaration about the right of the offspring of genetic experiments, once alive, to continue to live, regardless of the morality of the process by which they were created. That is to say, even though I *should* not attempt to clone human life, that whatever comes out of that attempt has a right to live unrelated to my moral state being 'specked' because of my role in it. This position of the RCC is part and parcel with the Church's concept of life and being human, and will not change.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    A good read

    The entire concept was interesting and overall it was a good read. I'm looking forward to reading the follow on books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2008

    A World of the Possible

    This is the first SciFi book that I ever read, and I have been in love with the genre ever since. What really makes this book a good read is that everything thing in this world is realistic and possible. The idea of a cloned military isn't all that far fetched. In this book, the soldier knows nothing about the technology that allows them travel great distances, and shows it. I liked that: Why should a common soldier know about the advanced workings of space travel? This is great read, give it a shot.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2007

    Excellent

    Steven L. Kent does a great job of combining action, politics, and believable science in a work that any reader of sci-fi will undoubtedly appreciate. The first-person narrative allows the reader to experience the thoughts of a grunt who was created to defend a populace that largely reviles is very existence. There was hardly a dull moment. The ending sets up a sequel that I cannot wait to begin reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Action-packed science fiction thriller

    The United States creates a one world government, the Unified Authority, which controls all the planets in the six arms of the Milky Way Galaxy. The marines, especially the enlisted men, are made up of mostly clones with special neural programming that enables them to believe they are naturals and to never talk about clones in the orphanages where they were raised.------ Private Wayson Harris is a natural person who grew up in a clone orphanage and enlisted in the marines. He observes from planet to planet and battle to battle that clones are treated as expendable equipment. The frontier worlds especially want their independence from the UA and secede from its protection. Civil War is coming Wayson because of who and what he is becomes a media darling and is promoted to officer status making him the target of some very angry officers in powerful positions.----- With the galaxy on the brink of war, there should be further books in this fascinating action-packed science fiction thriller series. What is interestingly is that all races are treated equally yet clones are considered no more than equipment so are considered non humans in spite of sharing all the same traits. Told from a clone¿s perspective, Steven L. Kent provides an intriguing plausible early twenty-sixth century work in which relationships throughout the galaxy seems somewhat the same as today on earth.--- - Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted November 19, 2010

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