Clorinda

( 1 )

Overview

Meet Clorinda!
Life on the farm is everything a cow like Clorinda could want, or so she thought. Then one Election Day, while up at dawn to travel to the distant city to cast her annual ballot, Clorinda is confused by the signs and stumbles into a performance of classical ballet instead. Bewilderment soon gives way to enchantment and she loses her heart to the magic of the dance. Clorinda's dream of becoming a bovine ballerina is set and she's headed for the big-city stage to ...

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Overview

Meet Clorinda!
Life on the farm is everything a cow like Clorinda could want, or so she thought. Then one Election Day, while up at dawn to travel to the distant city to cast her annual ballot, Clorinda is confused by the signs and stumbles into a performance of classical ballet instead. Bewilderment soon gives way to enchantment and she loses her heart to the magic of the dance. Clorinda's dream of becoming a bovine ballerina is set and she's headed for the big-city stage to start her career. Her mottoes, "Be bold and imaginative! Shoot for the sky!"
Robert Kinerk's witty and spirited verses combine with Steven Kellogg's effervescent and expansive artwork to introduce an endearing heroine. Irrepressible Clorinda will inspire standing ovations and cries of "ENCORE!" from picture-book readers of all ages.

Defying the odds, Clorinda the cow follows her dream of becoming a ballet dancer.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
"Sure to produce many chuckles."

School Library Journal

"A bovine so divine that it's hard to take your eyes off her."

Booklist

Publishers Weekly
Kinerk's (Slim and Miss Prim) rhyming tale centers on a cow who goes to town to vote, but instead of casting her ballot inadvertently attends a ballet and is inspired to try dancing herself. Back on the farm, Clorinda asks farmhand Len to build her a stage, where the tutu-clad bovine ballerina practices her positions, much to the disdain of the other animals, who announce, "No, no. That won't do./ You're only a cow, and what they do is moo!" Encouraged by Len, Clorinda heads for Manhattan, where she fails to land even an audition and takes a job waiting tables. After she gets her big break, the determined dancer practices her leap and worriedly sizes up her relatively slight partner: "Somehow,/ you may want to think twice about catching a cow," she advises him. Her fears are well founded: the airborne cow lands on her partner, yet earns cheers and applause anyway. Reinforcing Len's message, her fellow dancer explains, "They're doing all this because each understands/ the thing most important is making a try-/ you can't always triumph. You can't always fly." The cleverness of Kinerk's verse varies and its rhythm occasionally falters, although the tone remains invariably cheerful. Rendered in his trademark palette and exuberant style, Kellogg's illustrations emphasize the comical elements of the story. The back flap hints at an encore performance from Clorinda, too. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Once she has seen a ballet, Clorinda the cow is smitten with the desire to be a dancer. In nimble rhyming couplets we sweat through her not-so-nimble practice, encouraged by young Len to follow her dream, then her tribulations seeking a break in cold-hearted New York. When her chance finally comes, the obvious happens: her partner, despite assurances, cannot possibly catch her after her leap. Her thrill at dancing on stage at last turns to shame at her failure. But the audience appreciates that "the thing most important is making a try." Accepting the applause, but realizing that dancing on the New York stage is not for her, Clorinda goes back to the farm. Soon not only she, but all the animals, are experiencing the joy of dance, of "making a try." The enthusiasm of the verses is echoed in pure Kellogg visuals. His mixed water-based media scenes are dominated by lively anthropomorphic animals and a cast of supportive people with just enough detail to enhance the action. The views of Clorinda dancing are particularly delightful. The story begins on the front end-papers and ends with the happy animals dancing under the sun and moon at the back. 2003, A Paula Wiseman Book/ Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, Ages 4 to 8.
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Clorinda is happy with her bovine life on the farm until the fateful November day that she goes into town to vote, and ends up watching a ballet. Deciding to become a dancer, she puts on a tutu and practices in the barn on a stage that a farmhand builds for her. Although the other animals are not supportive ("No, no. That won't do./You're only a cow, and what they do is MOO!"), the farmhand is more encouraging, and Clorinda heads for New York City. She takes a job waiting tables to pay the bills and continues going on auditions. She finally gets her big break in Giselle, but soon comes to realize that dancing is not the best occupation for a cow. She heads home only to realize that she can still perform there. The colorful and zany illustrations are classic Kellogg. The pictures are filled with motion, and Clorinda manages to achieve a certain grace, despite her lumbering appearance. The spread where she flattens the dance partner who is trying to catch her is laugh-out-loud funny. This story told in rhyme is sure to produce many chuckles from youngsters who will delight in Clorinda's dreams of stardom.-Kristin de Lacoste, South Regional Public Library, Pembroke Pines, FL Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A rotund farm animal with a big personality and a yen to dance heads for the Big City. Sound familiar? Unlike Olivia, however, not only is Clorinda a cow, but she pays some dues on her way to a triumphant debut-and in the end learns to work within her limitations. After much weary auditioning and table-waiting, Clorinda finally joins a corps de ballet, but her joy lasts only until her first leap into a partner's arms brings both crashing down. Though astonished to hear the audience applauding her effort, Clorinda heads sadly back to the farm. Is that the end? Not at all: she opens a dancing school and creates her own troupe. Kinerk's verse gambols merrily along, and in full-bleed illustrations that extend to the endpapers, Kellogg's costumed dancers, human and livestock both, likewise cavort across the pages with characteristic verve. Children expecting a Disneyfied happy-ever-after may take the point unwillingly, but should notice that Clorinda never abandons her dream, even after coming to realize that it's not going to work out exactly the way she had hoped. (Picture book. 8-10)
From the Publisher
"Sure to produce many chuckles."
School Library Journal

"A bovine so divine that it's hard to take your eyes off her."
Booklist

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689864490
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.14 (w) x 11.34 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Kinerk is the author of Clorinda, illustrated by Steven Kellogg, which was an IRA Children's Book Award Notable Book, and about which Booklist said in a starred review, "Much applause for Clorinda."
Mr. Kinerk grew up in Alaska and has worked as a journalist and playwright. He now lives with his wife, Anne, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Steven Kellogg is the beloved illustrator of more than one hundred books for children including Clorinda and Clorinda Takes Flight, and he has been awarded the Regina Medal for his entire body of work. Mr. Kellogg works in an old barn overlooking Lake Champlain in Essex, New York, where he lives with his family.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 26, 2012

    Chasing Her Dreams

    This beautifully written tale of Clorina is inspirational and encouraging. It is about a cow that wants to dance ballet. Of course, this is difficult to do when you are a cow. But she perseveres and works hard until she manages to reach her dreams. But things don't turn out they way she had hoped...

    This witty story is charming and contains a good message about working for the things you really want...and knowing when something just isn't going to work for you.

    The Illustrations: The artwork is beautiful and expressive. Nicely outlined and detailed, the pictures in Clorinda draw the reader in and enhance the overall story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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