Close to the Edge [Bonus Tracks]

( 9 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Dave Thompson
With 1971's Fragile having left Yes poised quivering on the brink of what friend and foe acknowledged was the peak of the band's achievement, Close to the Edge was never going to be an easy album to make. Drummer Bill Bruford was already shifting restlessly against Jon Anderson's increasingly mystic/mystifying lyricism, while contemporary reports of the recording sessions depicted bandmate Rick Wakeman, too, as little more than an observer to the vast tapestry that Anderson, Steve Howe, and Chris Squire were creating. For it was vast. Close to the Edge comprised just three tracks, the epic "And You and I" and "Siberian Khatru," plus a side-long title track that ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Dave Thompson
With 1971's Fragile having left Yes poised quivering on the brink of what friend and foe acknowledged was the peak of the band's achievement, Close to the Edge was never going to be an easy album to make. Drummer Bill Bruford was already shifting restlessly against Jon Anderson's increasingly mystic/mystifying lyricism, while contemporary reports of the recording sessions depicted bandmate Rick Wakeman, too, as little more than an observer to the vast tapestry that Anderson, Steve Howe, and Chris Squire were creating. For it was vast. Close to the Edge comprised just three tracks, the epic "And You and I" and "Siberian Khatru," plus a side-long title track that represented the musical, lyrical, and sonic culmination of all that Yes had worked toward over the past five years. Close to the Edge would make the Top Five on both sides of the Atlantic, dispatch Yes on the longest tour of its career so far and, if hindsight be the guide, launch the band on a downward swing that only disintegration, rebuilding, and a savage change of direction would cure. The latter, however, was still to come. In 1972, Close to the Edge was a flawless masterpiece. Poorly treated by the first decade and a half of CDs, Close to the Edge's 2003 remaster is initially most notable for a positively shimmering remastering job -- the title track's "I Get Up I Get Down" section has a warmth and depth that past CDs were simply unable to capture, while the intricacy and delicacy of "And You and I" -- pound for pound, the apex of Yes' achievement -- is revealed in all the glory that must have attended its original studio playback. The slipcased packaging, meanwhile, restores Roger Dean's original artwork in all its albeit miniaturized glory, and a booklet offers up a tidy document of the sessions. Finally, four bonus tracks all but double the length of the original album. The single mix of "America," of course, should be familiar to all, but its B-side, a three-minute edit of "Close to the Edge"'s "Total Mass Retain" section, is startlingly punchy. "Siberia," a studio runthrough of "Siberian Khatru," is best left for connoisseurs, being little more than a lightly more ragged interpretation of the regular performance, but an alternate version of "And You and I" fascinates with its slightly slower pace, lower register, and a distinctly hesitant Anderson vocal. Several of the familiar changes, too, are absent and, while it will never replace the original in the heart of fans, it does remind listeners that the members of Yes really were human after all. For there are moments elsewhere on the disc where they truly seem somewhat beyond that.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/26/2003
  • Label: Elektra / Wea
  • UPC: 081227379025
  • Catalog Number: 73790
  • Sales rank: 3,483

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Yes Primary Artist
Rick Wakeman Keyboards, Group Member
Jon Anderson Vocals, Group Member
Bill Bruford Percussion, Drums, Group Member
Steve Howe Guitar, Vocals, Background Vocals, Group Member
Chris Squire Bass, Vocals, Background Vocals, Group Member
Technical Credits
Rick Wakeman Composer
Jon Anderson Composer
Bill Bruford Composer
Steve Howe Composer
Paul Simon Composer
Chris Squire Composer
Yes Producer, Audio Production
Roger Dean Cover Art
Greg Allen Art Direction
Dan Hersch Remastering
Bill Inglot Producer, Remastering
Eddy Offord Producer, Audio Production
Mike Tiano Liner Notes
Mike Tilano Liner Notes
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A great follow up to Fragile and the birth of future Yes keyboardists Oliver Wakeman.

    After Rick Wakeman joined Yes to replace Tony Kaye for the Fragile album, Yes had broken through, with the hits "Roundabout", and "Long Distance Runaround", which the album is one of their best, but this album is the follow up, but when they released it, Rick Wakeman's first son Oliver was born, who would one day perform with Yes. As for drummer enthusiasts, this album would make it final for Bill Bruford for Yes, but then he would perform on Rick Wakeman's solo album with the other Yes members Steve Howe, Chris Squire, and Alan White, who would, after the album and tour was completed, join Yes to replace him, but then he reunited with Chris Squire on his debut solo album Fish Out of Water with Patrick Moraz who replaced Rick Wakeman for the Relayer album which would be released in 1974, but then they would form a duo together. Meanwhile, in 1989 Bill Bruford would be reunited with Rick Wakeman, Jon Anderson, and Steve Howe for Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe. In 1991, they would join forces with the other Yes members Tony Kaye, Chris Squire, Alan White, and Trevor Rabin for the Union album and excellent tour, but after that had been completed, he would join Steve Howe and Jon Anderson for the Symphonic Music of Yes album with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and English Chamber Orchestra which was conducted by David Palmer, but after all of that he departed Yes. This album is great from start to finish, and this is a new review, since the 2008 reunion as occured, which all Yes fans would definately love.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A superb follow up to Fragile!

    This album is a follow up to Yes' Fragile album, and this album is also great from start to finish, and for the drummer enthusiasts, this marks Bill Bruford's last album with Yes, because Alan White who would become the permanent drummer for Yes in 1973, but in 1989 Bill Bruford reunited with Jon Anderson, Rick Wakeman, and Steve Howe with Anderson-Bruford-Wakeman-Howe album, the only members of the 1972 lineup, but in 1991, they joined forces with Tony Kaye, Alan White, Chris Squire, and Trevor Rabin on Yes' Union album and great tour. For keyboard enthusiasts, Rick Wakeman has a stunning organ solo in the middle of "Close To The Edge", which is totally outstanding. One thing for sure is, that this album is a must own album for every single Yes fan to enjoy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    No exaggeration needed, this is the best

    From the chaotic opening, right to the atmospheric closing solo, Close To The Edge never sinks below awe-inspiring. It takes the idea of a concept album and goes as far as it can go, with multi-part movements, only three tracks, and unexpected changes in tone and colour. It is one of the masterpieces of rock. Yes were a boling-pot not a band in the early 70's and the combination of Anderson, Bruford, Wakeman, Howe and Squire made for the tastiest soup since the breakup of the Cream. Anderson, the singer and lyric writer reached the edge of his talents, writing increasingly strange lyrics that sunk into the structure of the song, giving it an overall mystical flavour. Bruford, the brilliant drummer showered a wealth of drumming booty onto Close To The Edge, shining with hard-rock and jazz rythyms galore. Wakeman was becoming a superstar keyboard wizz-kid, he was playing some of the most emotional and consistently excellent fingerwork on this album. His synth-harpsichord solo on Siberian Khatru is totally out of this world. Squire provides the stock for the band with his trademark crunchy rickenbakker bass sound, but these basslines arn't just below the band, keeping the beat, they're up there giving Yes their vital sound. It's Steve Howe that makes Yes what they are on this album, providing jazz, rock, classical and folk guitar textures like herbs to the pot. Its not easy to say what the best bits are on an album like this- my personal favourites include the third "movement" of And You And I, the beautiful guitar melody gives way to a folky song, which in turn releases Howe and Wakeman to inteplay on a space-rock break. Theres also the opening rythym guitar riff on Khatru, I could go on and on and on. Whatever your taste, you must give this sublime album a try. Its got to be one of the best albums of the last century, and thats no exaggeration.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Super Great!

    I own a remastered copy of the original three-track recording. It doesn't need any extras to make it great. Even without bonus material, this album is an absolute winner. I love a record that tells a story or two, and this is no exception. Life lessons, friends and family, and to round out the experience is an irresistable rocking instrumental.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Could be their best....

    Close to the Edge is very accurately titled, for the album sees Yes take prog rock beyond anything they'd ever created before, and for many, it represents their absolute peak achievement. After this, they apparently went past the edge, fell off and became self-indulgent. Not entirely true, cos I love most of Tales from Topographic Oceans and Relayer, though I will admit, they're not for newcomers to Yes' music. As for Close to the Edge, well, if you don't like this, then you don't like prog rock, and there's no point trying to get on with the genre any more. For this is truly is one of the most wonderful albums ever made, and perfect proof that prog rock did spawn some of the most stunning music of all time. The beauty and the epic sprawl of The Yes Album and Fragile are taken a step further, to the point where the title track lasts a whole side of vinyl. 'Close to the Edge' is just stunning, a real achievement, and once you get past the frenentic headrush of jazz rock that opens the song, gorgeous, catchy melodies take centre stage, a bit of reggae, a bit of hard rock, a bit of funk, a lot of fun. Around ten minutes into it, it escalates into a truly transcendent sequence of music that's outrageously beautiful. 'And You and I' is magnificent also: very exciting, very uplifting. Gorgeous acoustic guitars, a mindblowing mid-section and some of the most soaring, epic moments ever put to vinyl. 'Siberian Khartru' sees the band rocking out in the style of their classic from Fragile, the stunning 'Roundabout'. Close to the Edge is a brilliant introduction to one of the most revered yet simultaneously misunderstood bands of all time. Possibly the best prog rock album of all time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Yes' Finest Moment

    After breaking through to the public on the strength of the classic single "Roundabout" and the album Fragile, Yes created a musical masterpiece with Close to the Edge. The original contained only three songs, and the Close to the Edge suite is still one of their best recordings. And You and I is a mostly acoustic piece that calms you after the high-energy suite, while Siberian Khatru is a darker, harder addition to the Yes canon. This is undoubtedly my favorite Yes recording, made at a creative high point before the somewhat scattershot Tales from Topographic Oceans (don't get me wrong, I like that album), and the rather lackluster Relayer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Great intro to prog rock

    I have always been into jazz, especially fusion. When I got my hands on this CD, a whole new world of truly creative and artistic music was opened to me. The insight into this music combined with the staggering vocal harmonies left me dumbstruck. I can't wait to get my hands on more Yes material.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wow

    All I have to say is wow... genius and wow

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews