The Closed World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America

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Overview

The Closed World offers a radically new alternative to the canonical histories of computers and cognitive science. Arguing that we can make sense of computers as tools only when we simultaneously grasp their roles as metaphors and political icons, Paul Edwards shows how Cold War social and cultural contexts shaped emerging computer technology -- and were transformed, in turn, by information machines.

The Closed World
explores three apparently disparate histories -- the history of American global power, the history of computing machines, and the history of subjectivity in science and culture -- through the lens of the American political imagination. In the process, it reveals intimate links between the military projects of the Cold War,
the evolution of digital computers, and the origins of cybernetics, cognitive psychology, and artificial intelligence.

Edwards begins by describing the emergence of a "closed-world discourse" of global surveillance and control through high-technology military power. The Cold War political goal of
"containment" led to the SAGE continental air defense system, Rand Corporation studies of nuclear strategy, and the advanced technologies of the Vietnam War. These and other centralized, computerized military command and control projects -- for containing world-scale conflicts -- helped closed-world discourse dominate Cold War political decisions. Their apotheosis was the Reagan-era plan for a " Star
Wars
" space-based ballistic missile defense.

Edwards then shows how these military projects helped computers become axial metaphors in psychological theory. Analyzing the Macy Conferences on cybernetics, the Harvard
Psycho-Acoustic Laboratory, and the early history of artificial intelligence, he describes the formation of a "cyborg discourse." By constructing both human minds and artificial intelligences as information machines, cyborg discourse assisted in integrating people into the hyper-complex technological systems of the closed world.

Finally, Edwards explores the cyborg as political identity in science fiction -- from the disembodied, panoptic AI of 2001: A Space
Odyssey
, to the mechanical robots of Star Wars and the engineered biological androids of Blade Runner -- where
Information Age culture and subjectivity were both reflected and constructed.

Inside Technology series

The MIT Press

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"A fascinating glimpse into the history of computing and a cogentreminder of the extent to which this history continues to inform ourvision of the future." Grant Kester,The Nation

" The Closed World is astonishing. One of the most important books of the 20th century." Howard Rheingold, editor, Whole Earth Review

Grant Kester, The Nation

A fascinating glimpse into the history of computing and a cogentreminder of the extent to which this history continues to inform ourvision of the future.

Howard Rheingold, Whole Earth Review

The Closed World is astonishing. One of the most important books of the 20th century.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262550284
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/1997
  • Series: Inside Technology
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 462
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul N. Edwards is Professor in the School of Information and the Department of
History at the University of Michigan. He is the author of The Closed
World: Computers and the Politics of Discourse in Cold War America
(1996)
and a coeditor (with Clark Miller) of Changing the Atmosphere: Expert
Knowledge and Environmental Governance
(2001), both published by the MIT
Press.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1 "We Defend Every Place": Building the Cold War World 1
2 Why Build Computers?: The Military Role in Computer Research 43
3 SAGE 75
4 From Operations Research to the Electronic Battlefield 113
5 Interlude: Metaphor and the Politics of Subjectivity 147
6 The Machine in the Middle: Cybernetic Psychology and World War II 175
7 Noise, Communication, and Cognition 209
8 Constructing Artificial Intelligence 239
9 Computers and Politics in Cold War II 275
10 Minds, Machines, and Subjectivity in the Closed World 303
Epilogue: Cyborgs in the World Wide Web 353
Notes 367
Index 429
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