Cloudland

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A stunning literary thriller set in rural Vermont from Joseph Olshan, the much praised author of Nightswimmer and Clara's Heart

Once a major reporter for a national newspaper, Catherine Winslow has retreated to the Upper Valley of Vermont to write a household hints column. While out walking during an early spring thaw, Catherine discovers the body of a woman leaning against an apple tree near her house. From the corpse’s pink parka, Winslow recognizes her as the latest victim of...

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Overview

A stunning literary thriller set in rural Vermont from Joseph Olshan, the much praised author of Nightswimmer and Clara's Heart

Once a major reporter for a national newspaper, Catherine Winslow has retreated to the Upper Valley of Vermont to write a household hints column. While out walking during an early spring thaw, Catherine discovers the body of a woman leaning against an apple tree near her house. From the corpse’s pink parka, Winslow recognizes her as the latest victim of a serial killer, a woman reported missing weeks before during a blizzard.

When her neighbor, a forensic psychiatrist, is pulled into the investigation, Catherine begins to discover some unexpected connections to the serial murders. One is that the murders might be based on a rare unfinished Wilkie Collins novel that is missing from her personal library. The other is her much younger lover from her failed affair has unexpectedly resurfaced and is trying to maneuver his way back into her affections.

Elegant, haunting and profoundly gripping, Cloudland is an ingenious psychological trap baited with murder, deception and the intricacies of desire.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Olshan (The Conversion), known for his literary fiction, delivers a crime novel more likely to satisfy mainstream than genre readers. Catherine Winslow, a former investigative journalist and college professor, gets drawn into the hunt for a serial killer after finding the frozen body of a missing nurse in an orchard near her rural Vermont home. Conveniently, her neighbor on isolated Cloudland Road, Anthony Waite, is a forensic psychiatrist. Waite assists Det. Marco Prozzo in the police investigation, though it’s never clear why they hold so much stock in Catherine’s opinions. Catherine tries to draw literary connections between the murders and the plot of an unfinished Wilkie Collins novel, all while worrying about the reappearance of her former lover, Matthew Blake. Seventh Day Adventist literature found near several of the corpses suggests a religious motive. Though the crimes are based on real events, the lack of suspense and an unsympathetic heroine (Catherine once had a romance with a student that ended in violence) make for a less than satisfying mystery. Author tour. Agent: Mitchell Waters, Curtis Brown. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Out walking one late March afternoon, Catherine Winslow spies a body propped against a tree, and she knows it's a local woman who went missing that winter. Unfortunately, this case isn't an anomaly; a spate of killings is plaguing the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire. A former high-profile investigative reporter, 41-year-old Catherine has retreated to a remote farmhouse, where she writes a syndicated column. Additionally, she teaches writing at the local prison. Detective Prozzo hires Catherine's neighbor friend Anthony to help with the profiling, since he has a background in forensic psychiatry. Anthony hashes over details of the crimes with Catherine. While the townspeople like to think an outsider is targeting their area, the authorities are thinking local. When a prime suspect turns out to be Catherine's ex-lover, the psychological tension ratchets up. VERDICT Rarely do you find a story with characters so fully developed that you feel as if they might live next door. Conjuring a distinctly 19th-century atmosphere, Olshan (The Conversion; Nightswimmer) excels at crafting a Dickensian literary piece, but the amount of detail may put off some readers expecting more action. Wilkie Collins fans, on the other hand, will be delighted by the role of the author of The Moonstone in this plot. [See Prepub Alert, 10/31/11.]
Kirkus Reviews
In this refreshingly cliché-free serial-killer tale, Olshan tries his hand with a female narrator/heroine, whom he handles just as deftly as his sensitive male heroes (The Conversion, 2008, etc.). Two-and-a-half years and five corpses after Tammy Boucher was stabbed to death in New England's River Valley, police in Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts still don't have any idea who's killing these women or why. The forensic evidence is hopeless, and the discovery of Seventh-Day Adventist tracts on some of the victims hardly seems to rise to the level of a clue. After she discovers the sixth victim, long-missing nurse Angela Parker, buried in the thawing snow, Catherine Winslow, a former investigative reporter who's retreated to Vermont to write a syndicated column of household hints, finds herself drawn into the case and is soon resisting the suggestions of Springfield-based Det. Marco Prozzo, who's evidently intent on pinning the crimes on knacker Hiram Osmond or painter Paul Winter's adopted son Wade. Prozzo doesn't seem to notice several more inviting suspects, from Dr. Anthony Waite, the troubled psychiatrist who's helping with the investigation, to Matthew Blake, the former college student who'd been Catherine's lover and is now conveniently returned from Thailand, where he said he'd gone to forget her. Although all these chilly, hurting souls are well worth your time, the real keeper is Catherine, still grieving the death of the husband she'd divorced and the loss of the younger lover she'd pushed away. Even as you wonder who the killer will turn out to be, you'll worry mainly about how she's going to come through all this.
Marilyn Stasio
Although Olshan is merciful to all the cruel lovers, faithless spouses and angry children who live in this lonely place, the bracing clarity of his prose doesn't allow for false sentiment…When speaking of matters like romantic obsession and violence in close relationships, a voice like that really cuts through the air of a cold climate.
—The New York Times Book Review
From the Publisher
“Joseph Olshan has stepped up and hit one for the home team.  The bracing clarity of his prose…observes the destructive impact [the] killings have on this isolated region.” –Marilyn Stasio, New York Times Book Review

“Evocative… the intricate whodunnit has faint echoes of [Wilkie] Collins with Catherine in the role of his ‘Woman In White,’ wandering desolate hills, but not trying nearly hard enough to escape her past.” –The Boston Globe

“CLOUDLAND is a lyrical love poem to that region (Vermont, New Hampshire) – its landscape, its weather, its people – and also to the writings of Wilkie Collins, whose Victorian-era writings helped lay the groundwork for the mystery genre.” –The Charlotte Observer

“The effect of violence on small communities is one of the most provocative themes for mystery fiction. Joseph Olshan expands that plot…[He] makes a bold and quite effective foray into crime fiction.” –Oline Cogdill, The Florida Sun Sentinel  

“A fine writer” –The Washington Post

“Olshan, has a reputation for writing beautifully….Cloudland is a love letter to Vermont.” –The Washington Independent Book Review

“In this refreshingly cliché-free serial-killer tale, Olshan tries his hand with a female narrator/heroine, whom he handles just as deftly as his sensitive male heroes. Although all these chilly, hurting souls are well worth your time, the real keeper is Catherine. Even as you wonder who the killer will turn out to be, you’ll worry mainly about how she’s going to come through all this.” –Kirkus Reviews

“A crash course in Wilkie Collins, wrapped in a thrilling contemporary mystery” –Mystery Scene Magazine 

“Unlike the more common, adrenaline-fueled serial-killer thrillers, this is literary, character-driven fiction with remarkable empathy not only for those whom murder leaves behind but also for the perpetrator. Another fine performance from a critically acclaimed author.” –Booklist 

“Rarely do you find a story with characters so fully developed that you feel as if they might live next door. Conjuring a distinctly 19th-century atmosphere, Olshan excels at crafting a Dickensian literary piece.” –Library Journal 

"Olshan's writing is frequently stunning, particularily when he's describing the landscape of the book's Vermont setting, and he's crafted...a handful of interesting small town types..." -The A.V. Club (The Onion)

“Cloudland (Minotaur) is one of those books that grabs you by the neck and pulls you in, unrelenting and completely taking you..” –CrimeSpree Magazine

“CLOUDLAND, by Joseph Olshan, is obviously a crime novel and a great one at that….The book is not just about mystery – it is also about fascinating characters.” –The Hungry Reader

“This is a gripping crime novel, with a perfect ending, a surprise that doesn't come out of the blue, but fits the story. The isolated setting, and the story of the murdered women are vividly created in this book. Readers who are fans of S.J. Bolton's atmospheric thrillers should try Olshan's Cloudland. Cloudland isn't Olshan's first book. However, it's his first crime novel, and it's pitch perfect.”  –Lesa’s Critiques  

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250000170
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/10/2012
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.48 (w) x 9.34 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

Joseph Olshan is the award-winning author of ten novels including Nightswimmer and The Conversion. He spends most of the year in Vermont.

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Read an Excerpt

Cloudland


By Joseph Olshan

Minotaur Books

Copyright © 2012 Joseph Olshan
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9781250000170

ONE
 
 
IT WAS UNDER AN APPLE TREE that I saw her—up the road on the walk that I’ve taken hundreds of times in my life. I noticed her pink parka and thought: she’s out here drinking in the unusual warmth of late March; her face to the sun, hardy soul she must be, sitting there tanning in a crater of melting snow. I didn’t have my dogs with me because they’re older and arthritic and because the muddy road was deeply rutted, slippery with glare ice.
I usually go a half mile up the road to the red farm with a glass greenhouse where my painter friend raises orange trees that bear fruit all winter. Then I make a slow turn and wander back. I’m usually thinking about my deadline; that day I was grateful that a trusty reader from Mississippi had sent me a formula for ridding white T-shirts of armpit stains. When I passed the orchard, there she was again: the pink parka, the face still canted to the sun at the same angle, and—I realized for the first time—completely still. Now I stopped, partly because of how motionless she was, but also because I could hear Virgil and Mrs. Billy barking back at the house. The shift in wind direction had probably brought them her scent.
Sinking into the soft, crusty snow, I took wobbly steps toward her, somehow knowing not to call out, but still not knowing how she might be. Ten feet away I saw the depression of snow around her, soaked in rusty brown. Now certain she was dead and the stain was blood, I made myself march on until I stood before the pale gray face, the slight double chin. I turned away for a moment, overcome with nausea. When I forced myself to look at her again I noticed beads of ice melting on her brow. I was thankful that her eyes were closed. Her parka was pretty well zipped up, but her throat was exposed and blotchy and eggplant purple, her lips bruised and black. I knew it was Angela Parker, a nurse who had disappeared in mid-January from a rest area off Interstate 91 and whose blood was found all over the inside of her car.
When she’d first gone missing and her picture was published everywhere, I actually thought I recognized her as someone who’d taken my blood several times at the hospital. I remembered the kind manner distracting me from the needle, nimble fingers making the draw much less of an ouch. She was the sixth victim in two years.
Long before Angela Parker was buried in the orchard snow, I’d imagine all sorts of marauders: hunters heading home from a day in the woods; drug runners from Canada on their way down through Vermont toward Boston or Providence. My driveway is just a quarter-mile long, so the rumor of passing cars filters through to me, especially when leaves have fallen and there is no buffer to the sound. I hear most of everything that passes.
And motorists have always mistaken this road for a more popular thoroughfare another half mile down Route 12. They usually recognize their error by the time they’re cresting the first long hill, which is precisely where my driveway begins. Often at night I’ve been sitting at my writing desk, sifting through correspondence from people who read my advice columns, when a pair of headlamps telescopes through my rolled-glass windows. Somebody will have made a wrong turn onto my land, their car paused, its lighted eyes staring and blinding. Sometimes a car has ventured close enough to the house that the motion detector lamps have switched on. I’ve stopped working and waited until the vehicle began moving again.
But after the discovery of her body was reported all over the northeast, I found myself wondering if the killer would read the article, would learn that I was a forty-one-year-old woman living alone up here on Cloudland. I began to worry that each wandering tourist was the man whose DNA the police had been unable to detect—always the killer in my mind’s eye, never some flatlander looking for Advent Road, whose famous B & B has been written up in all the travel magazines.
A few years ago, my editor at the newspaper syndicate said to me, “I can’t imagine anyone would dare to bother you when you have dogs and a domestic pig no less.”
“Why would a bunch of animals stand in the way?”
“Because they’d protect you.”
I looked at my babies and thought: Would you? Could you? My house pig, Henrietta, often got angry and territorial. She’d rush the dogs and knock them over. I always wondered if she had it in her to take out a murderer before that murderer could stick his knife into her heart.
The night Angela Parker was stabbed and dumped unceremoniously in the apple orchard, there were no lost tourists, no invasion of headlamps; we had a snowstorm with blizzard conditions. The flakes were funneling down like pestilence, stinging my nineteenth-century windows. The wind was howling, its drafts seeping through the old bony rafters of the house. I was trying out a recipe for marble cake that somebody from Omaha had sent me, mixing white flour with cornmeal and threading dark chocolate into the batter. I heard the town truck dredging through, its yellow wing plow carving the fresh snow up into waves. The plowman remembers a single pair of virgin tire tracks winding along the deep drifts, tracks that, in his estimation, miraculously made it up Cloudland Road’s first big hill before they vanished.
Earlier that day Angela Parker had met some of her hospital coworkers at a ski resort in southern Vermont. Driving home she stopped at the Hartland rest area on Interstate 91 sometime between five and seven P.M. She called her husband from a pay phone to say she’d made it that far in the storm. But she never turned up at home, and the following day her car was found in the parking bay of the rest area. By then she was already ten miles away from where she was abducted, just up the road from me. And to think that each time I went for a walk I had passed within fifteen yards of this mother of two lying in a vault of snow that would entomb her for the rest of January and February and most of March. Her husband grew so distraught when she disappeared that he ended up begging his parents to move up from Tewksbury, Massachusetts, to take care of him and his children.
When they finally brought her down from Cloudland, the road was so clotted with spring mud that the funeral home had to borrow a four-wheel drive. I couldn’t help but watch them load her rigid body onto the stretcher, just the way I couldn’t help watching when Hiram Osmond, our local “knacker man,” arrived with chains to winch my dead farm animals up into his pickup truck, taking them home to hack and boil. I also watched hunters lug their quarry out of the forest: dead bucks with glazed, opaque eyes and huge pink slits in their bellies. I watched the seasons blend: a spike of warmth in midwinter, then a venomous cold that gave rise to the frost heaves that sent cars careering off the road. But when the ice finally thawed and the ponds caved in with a bellow, those apple trees where I found her had begun to throw their buds.


 
Copyright © 2012 by Joseph Olshan


Continues...

Excerpted from Cloudland by Joseph Olshan Copyright © 2012 by Joseph Olshan. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

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( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Cloudland I enjoyed Cloudland very much..Mr. Olshan transported

    Cloudland
    I enjoyed Cloudland very much..Mr. Olshan transported me to a relatively isolated rural Vermont area where a murder victim is discovered as the snow slowly melts with the season change.. I was instantly taken in by the writing style. The main character is Catherine Winslow and she is the person who discovers the body. She lives alone in that rural area. The tension builds as Catherine begins to piece together clues...This psychological thriller will appeal to men and women who enjoy an involved, more literary work. Susan Simon

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 20, 2012

    I picked up this novel after hearing the author interviewed on N

    I picked up this novel after hearing the author interviewed on New Hampshire Public Radio. I spent yesterday reading it and was struck by a number of strengths. First of all, he writes beautifully, which is rare to find in a suspense novel. Yes of course you get fine writing in the novels of P.D. James and Ruth Rendell and Dorothy Sayers and, of course John Le Carre. Nevertheless, I was struck by the lyrical approach the author took to writing about murders and fear and longing. The novel is really a hybrid of a literary novel and a novel of suspense such that we'd find in the work of Wilkie Collins, whose own work figures prominently in Olshan's plot. There were enough twists and turns to satisfy me, perhaps not as much as in, say, Defending Jacob, but this is not a courtroom drama, it's a novel with fully realized, complicated characters and that alone compelled my attention.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 23, 2012

    not recommended

    very easy to put down and I did so frequently. Bored with plot and story.But I good choice if you want to cure your insomnia fast

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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