Club Dead (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

( 2075 )

Overview

Sookie's boyfriend has been very distant-in another state, distant. Now she's off to Mississippi to mingle with the underworld at Club Dead-a little haunt where the vampire elite go to chill out. But when she finally finds Bill-caught in an act of betrayal-she's not sure whether to save him...or sharpen some stakes.

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Club Dead (Sookie Stackhouse / Southern Vampire Series #3)

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Overview

Sookie's boyfriend has been very distant-in another state, distant. Now she's off to Mississippi to mingle with the underworld at Club Dead-a little haunt where the vampire elite go to chill out. But when she finally finds Bill-caught in an act of betrayal-she's not sure whether to save him...or sharpen some stakes.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Charlaine Harris's Southern Vampire saga (begun with Dead Until Dark and Living Dead in Dallas) chronicles the life and times of Sookie Stackhouse, a telepathic waitress in love with a vampire named Bill Compton. Sookie is attracted to Bill not just because he's physically appealing and practically immortal but also because she can't read his mind. The glamour and mystery surrounding the tall, pale, and handsome vampire -- as well as his supernatural bloodsucking friends -- draws Sookie in to wild, otherworldly romance, as well as incomprehensible danger.

In Club Dead, Bill informs Sookie that he has to go somewhere on a top-secret mission for the queen of Louisiana (vampires have a strict territorial hierarchy) and promptly disappears. Later, Sookie is informed by Eric, the charismatic head of the local vampire territory, that someone has kidnapped Bill in Mississippi and that his life may be in grave danger. Sookie also learns that her undead boyfriend was actually summoned by one of his ex-girlfriends, a vicious vampire named Lorena, who was hired to seduce, abduct, and torture Bill to obtain his top-secret information. Eric believes that Russell Edgington, the powerful king of Mississippi, has Bill somewhere on his sprawling compound. Sookie decides to do anything to rescue him.

Like Laurell K. Hamilton's popular vampire hunter, Anita Blake, Sookie Stackhouse is a strong, intelligent, very sexy woman with a great sense of humor and a strange knack for getting emotionally involved with the undead. Club Dead is an action-packed page-turner of a fantastical mystery comparable to Hamilton's saga. Paul Goat Allen

KLIATT
This is the third installment in the series; however it can be read by itself. Sookie Stackhouse is a strong, independent female who happens to have the gift of being telepathic. She falls in love with a vampire specifically because she cannot read his mind. Her lover, Bill, is kidnapped by his ex-lover Lorena, a vampire who is notoriously vicious. Sookie hooks up with a charming werewolf (is there another kind?) who will safely accompany her to Jackson, Mississippi where Bill is being held. The werewolf has just had his heart broken and is immediately smitten with Sookie. Their destination is Club Dead, where all the elite vampires hang out. Needless to say, Sookie is an intelligent protagonist, beautiful and blessed with acerbic wit. She also has an uncanny attraction to danger. This will appeal to readers who immerse themselves in this genre. It has humor sprinkled about, which helps with all the violence. (Southern Vampire Saga). KLIATT Codes: SA-Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2003, Berkley, Ace, 258p., Ages 15 to adult.
— Sherri F. Ginsberg
VOYA
Telepath Sookie Stackhouse again is in over her neck in this third novel of The Southern Vampire series. A mixture of mystery and romance, Dead Until Dark (Ace, 2001) garnered the Anthony Award, and Living Dead in Dallas (Ace 2002/VOYA October 2002) achieved bestseller status, but Harris's series falters here. Suffering from weak editing and a disjointed plot, it reads like a bad Harlequin Romance. Sookie wants to marry her bloodsucking boyfriend, Bill, but instead finds herself abandoned for a new fanged flame. Stakes are later raised when Bill is kidnapped by Nosferatu, who covets the database of undead he has compiled for Louisiana's vampire queen. Sookie must team with a werewolf and Bill's night-stalking boss, Eric, to discover his whereabouts. With unexpected help from Bubba-a vampire who was Elvis in life-Sookie rescues her lover from death's silver chains, only to dismiss him as the plot buries itself. Harris's series takes itself too gravely to its rival, the campy Buffy the Vampire Slayer series. Neither Bill nor Eric possesses spinoff Angel's endearing qualities, and Sookie pales in comparison to self-assured Buffy. The submissive role Sookie plays in her sexually addictive relationship with Bill might prove offensive to some, as she increasingly plays the abused victim's role. Vamp-were addicts will devour this novel notwithstanding its shortcomings, but discriminating readers will find the titles in Laurel K. Hamilton's Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter series and Huff's Blood books superior works. Annette Curtis Klause's Silver Kiss (Delacorte, 1990/VOYA December 1990) is recommended for younger genre readers. VOYA Codes: 2Q 2P S A/YA (Better editing or work by the author mighthave warranted a 3Q; For the YA with a special interest in the subject; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult). 2003, Ace, 258p,
— Sherry Korthals
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606121521
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/1/2003
  • Series: Sookie Stackhouse/Southern Vampire Series , #3
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
  • Pages: 292
  • Product dimensions: 4.20 (w) x 6.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Charlaine Harris
Born and raised in the Mississippi Delta, Charlaine Harris is best known for her paranormal mysteries -- a sly, wry blend of humor, horror, that has been called "cozies with teeth."

Biography

A native of the Mississippi Delta, Charlaine Harris grew up in a family of avid readers (her father was a teacher; her mother a librarian). She attended Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, graduating in 1973 with a degree in English and Communication Arts. Although she penned poetry and plays in school, her first serious foray into fiction was with two standalone novels, Sweet and Deadly and A Secret Rage, published (effortlessly!) in the early 1980s.

After her early success, Harris released the first installment in a series of lighthearted mysteries starring spunky, small-town Georgia librarian, true crime enthusiast, and amateur sleuth Aurora Teagarden. When Aurora debuted in Real Murders (1990), Publishers Weekly welcomed "a heroine as capable and potentially complex as P. D. James's Cordelia Gray." The book went on to receive an Agatha Award nomination.

Anxious for another challenge, Harris began a second series in 1996. Darker and edgier than the Teagarden novels, these mysteries featured taciturn, 30-something housecleaner Lily Bard, a woman with a complicated past who has moved to the small town of Shakespeare, Arkansas, to find peace and solitude. The first novel, Shakespeare's Landlord, was well-received. BookList raved: "Harris has created an intriguing new character in this solidly plotted story." [Much to the disappointment of her fans, Harris concluded the Lilly Bard sequence in 2001 with Shakespeare's Counselor.]

Although Harris achieved moderate success with these two series (which she laughingly describes as "cozies with teeth"), she would hit the jackpot in 2001 with Dead Until Dark, a sly, spoofy paranormal mystery starring a telepathic Louisiana cocktail waitress named Sookie Stackhouse, who falls in love with a vampire named Bill. The novel, a delightful hybrid of mystery, science fiction, and romance, was an instant hit with critics. ("Harris' Sookie has the potential to attract more readers than Hamilton's Anita Blake," raved the dark fantasy magazine Cemetery Dance.) Readers, too, adored the Southern Vampire Series and have rewarded the author with bestseller after bestseller. (In 2008, the Sookie saga came to HBO in a top-rated television adaptation, True Blood, starring Anna Paquin.)

With 2006's Grave Sight, Harris added yet another fascinating character to her stable -- a young woman named Harper Connelly whose youthful encounter with a lightning bolt has left her with the ability to find corpses and determine how they died. In addition to juggling characters and plots for her popular series, Harris has also contributed short stories and novellas to several anthologies of paranormal fantasy fiction.

Good To Know

In our interview, Harris confesses:

"I'm really a boring person. My family (my husband and three children) is the most important thing in my life. I go to bed early, I get up early. I love to go to the movies with my husband. My favorite things about finally making some money as a writer are (a) I can buy as many books as I want, and (b) I can hire a maid. The first job I had was working in an offset darkroom at a very small newspaper. I stood on a concrete floor all day and made minimum wage -- which then was $1.60 an hour. I hated it, and I learned a lot, though not necessarily about working in a darkroom. So being a writer is much better."

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    1. Hometown:
      Southern Arkansas
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 25, 1951
    2. Place of Birth:
      Tunica, Mississippi
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English and Communication Arts, Rhodes, 1973
    2. Website:

Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Charlaine Harris

Paul Goat Allen: In a recent B&N.com interview with Laurell K. Hamilton, she theorized that her Anita Blake novels were so popular because of the unique appeal of genre mixing -- a little mystery, a little fantasy, a little horror, a little romance. In the last few years, several similar supernatural genre-hopping novels have appeared on bestselling lists. Why do you think these types of books are so wildly popular?

Charlaine Harris: Maybe these books are so popular because of the juxtaposition of the magical with the mundane. It's the most intriguing "What if?" of all. What if the man you were dating was a vampire? What if your employer was a werewolf? What if you, a human, were somehow on the inside track of this world, which remains largely concealed from most other humans? The supernatural and the paranormal have always had a strong hold on my imagination. Though for many years I only wrote conventional mysteries, I always wanted to incorporate my interest in the "other world" into my work. My fascination with this other world, the world of the imaginary become real, all began when I was quite young, and I wanted the Loch Ness Monster to be real more than anything. (I still do.) I have to point out, though, that I wrote Dead Until Dark (the 2001 lead book in the Southern Vampire series) more than three years before it was finally published. It took my agent a very long time to place the book. If Laurell's books hadn't proved to be so popular, I don't think the genre-straddling Southern Vampire books would ever have seen the light of day.

PGA: Another trend in numerous new releases is the normalizing of the supernatural. In your Southern Vampire novels, vampires are accepted members of society with specific products like PureBlood and establishments like Josephine's (a.k.a. Club Dead) marketed at their demographic. From a writer's perspective, what are the advantages -- and disadvantages -- of this normalizing of the supernatural?

CH: From my point of view, there are no disadvantages. If I was writing a more traditional, prince-of-darkness type book, with brooding majestic vampires, having them pick up their blood at the local liquor store would be a real problem. But I'm writing humor (though I admit my books do have their dark and frightening and sexy moments). It's definitely to my advantage to plonk down my creatures of the night in rural modern America. Even a vampire has to buy his clothes somewhere, right? And someone has to come fix his leaky roof. And if he has a roof to leak, then he has to pay property taxes.... You see how one thought leads to another, when you're trying to place vampires in the framework of the workaday world. I have an absolutely great time doing this.

PGA: How much are you like Sookie Stackhouse? Did you ever live in your grandparents' house and/or have a gravel driveway with potholes? (I know that last part of the question sounds crazy, but when I finished Club Dead, the image of that long gravel driveway stuck in my head!)

CH: Sookie's long gravel driveway winds through dense woods on the way to her house, and mine is pretty much in a straight line, but we do have to warn the UPS and FedEx trucks before they attempt it. Hey, we're going to fix it! Really! I think "pothole" is a pretty mild term for what's in our driveway..."crater" would probably be more accurate. I never lived with my grandparents, who are all gone now. My parents are still very much alive, and I lived with them in a very conventional family way until I went to college. As to how in other ways I might be like Sookie -- hmmm. Well, when I was growing up, I always felt like an outsider, as Sookie does. Her isolation is like that teen "I'm the only person in the world who feels like this" angst, carried to the nth degree. Sookie has to make connections with the varied beings she encounters, because relationships with regular human beings are very difficult for her. I am not as brave as Sookie, I suppose, and I had the advantage of more education. But it seems to me that Sookie is very conventional in what she wants: a stable relationship, friendships to rely on, financial security, and a congenial job. Unfortunately, a lot of this is very difficult for her to achieve -- but she keeps trying. That's something I really like about her.

PGA: Have you started working on the fourth Southern Vampire book yet? Is there a tentative title and/or release date? Any tidbits of plot information that you'd like to tease the fans with?

CH: Yes, I'm happily at work on the fourth Southern Vampire book. The title is Dead to the World. I'm pretty sure we'll stick with that, though a change is always possible. Dead to the World will be out in April 2004; God willing and the creek don't rise. The book will pick up maybe a couple of weeks after the ending of Club Dead, with Sookie making a New Year's resolution that is somewhat unusual. Then she has to babysit Eric, who has amnesia...and of course, the situation gets very complicated very quickly, as events always pile up on each other in Sookie's world.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2075 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1308)

4 Star

(524)

3 Star

(182)

2 Star

(30)

1 Star

(31)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 2093 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 16, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent Read

    I really enjoyed this book even although the first one was my favourite one in the Southern Vampire series. The story will keeps you entertained for hours.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 5, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Great!

    Bill goes missing and Sookie goes to Jackson to find where he could be. She goes with Alcide, a werewolf who helps her since he owes Eric a favor. Will Sookie find Bill? Could it have anything to do with a secret project he's been working on? Another great read in the series. Seems the series gets even better with each book.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Club Dead by Charlaine Harris

    I really enjoyed this book. Even though I have to still say the second one was my favorite in this series thus far I still highly recommend this book. I think the part that truly bugged me though was the fact that Sookie was not more surprised by Bills actions. I still loved this book and had some resistance in putting the book down. I totally recommend this for all who love the genre of Paranormal Romance.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Light and fluffy entertainment, no substance.

    Sookie Stackhouse is in a pickle again, but this time her vampire boyfriend Bill can't save her. because she's the one that has to save him.

    When Bill is kidnapped only Sookie can listen for clues to his whereabouts. But what she learns about where Bill was when he was kidnapped, and why he stayed away, may be too much for her to handle. Torn between a deep sense of betrayal and a deeper bond of loyalty, Sookie must decide who to help, and how far she's willing to go.

    This is the third book in the Southern Vampire Mysteries series and to be honest, I sometimes wonder why I waste my brain-power. Once again the writing is nothing special, bordering on amateurish. Harris has written Sookie as a frequenly annoying and grating narrator. I don't care to know what exact color, pattern, and fabric your pajamas are every single time you put on a pair. Likewise, I don't give a crap about your word-a-day calendar unless that calendar is going to cut someone's head off at the end of the book (it doesn't).

    So many times throughout this book I wanted to yell at Sookie. I wanted to say, "Sookie, Bill bit the bejeesus out of your neck. Just because your body feels good nestled against his is no reason to cuddle!" I wanted to tell her that Eric just wants to get into her pants, so though it's nice that he seems all warm and fuzzy toward her now, it's not okay for him to do gross things while she drinks his blood. And Alcide!? Alcide is a hot werewolf, for those who haven't read the book. And in order to listen to the clues for Bill, Sookie has to pretend to be Alcide's girlfriend, and of course things get complicated there. I don't even know what shape I could use to define Sookie's love life, but it's definitely one with many sides. Three books into the series and I really wish she'd get her act together and start thinking with her brain instead of her lady-business.

    I'm also really tired of Sookie always being the victim of abuse. This is not to say she doesn't defend herself, because she does, every time. But several times in the last three books she's been completely torn apart and beaten to shreds. Bloodied and bruised and broken to the point of death, I'm really tired of everyone trying to kill her.

    In conclusion, I may read the fourth book in the series at some time in the future, but I think it's possible this is one of the rare examples where the screen version is better than the book in my estimation. The acting on TrueBlood is more genuine to me than Sookie's narration in the novel. This is the kind of series I would download on an eReader if I had one, because though it's entertaining, it's not anything that's going to enrich my physical book collection.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2012

    A Sookie Stackhouse mystery - vampire - whatever ...

    These books are like popcorn and a movie. Great entertainment. Sex, vampires, shapechangers, and other nasties. What's not to like.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Great Book

    Out of what I have read so far on the Southern Vampire Series, Club Dead has to be the best one. The has quickly grow into one of my favorite book series. Charlaine Harris's style of writing keep me wanting more of Sookie Stackhouse adventures in a world that anything can happen. I defiantly recommend this book to anyone whose looking for a very interesting read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great Series

    I have read all of the Southern Vampire/Sookie Stackhouse series that have come out so far (my favorite is Dead to the World). I love them all, they have original plots and twists, always something new happening and new characters to meet! My only problem is not so much with the way that Charlaine Harris writes as much as her continuity issues. For example through most of the books she refers to Jason's boss as Catfish Hennessey then in one book she calls him Catfish Hunter through the entire book. Another example is that she refers to Maxine Fortenberry as Hoyt's grandmother then changes to call her his mother. Just somethings that you would think the writer would catch and if not her someone in the proofing or editing process. I realize it's not a big issue but I think it insults the readers intelligence, memory, and attention-span to not pay better attention to those details. That being said didn't keep me from reading the books, or thoroughly enjoying them, or raving about them to interested readers!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 29, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I am addicted to this series " GIVE ME MORE "

    I am addicted to this series " GIVE ME MORE "

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2014

    This series was written in a simplistic/amateurish first person

    This series was written in a simplistic/amateurish first person format. Sookie is an annoying protagonist  and spends too much time
    focusing on her libido and not using her brain. She comes off as a Mary Sue. The author gives us boring unnecessary detail about
    Sookie's clothing and shampooing her hair, but then glosses over more pertinent details and descriptions that would enhance the story
    line. Sookie has the emotional depth of a sponge and is not a relatable character whatsoever.  I was disappointed by the unsophisticated
    dialogue, lack of character development and frequent use of sex to add excitement to an otherwise lackluster series. 

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2014

    Really like the book. It's not Pride and Prejudice, except perh

    Really like the book. It's not Pride and Prejudice, except perhaps it serves a similar function for the times we live in.

    Sookie is a good heroine, independent, smart. resourceful, talented. Bill and Eric are good romantic possibilities for her, though flawed and actually not even human. Alcide is ok, only part supernatural and a little boring. It's great that Sookie has a selection from which to choose, but I don't find him nearly as exciting. Harris writes Sookie into good adventures 3 books into the series, better that the TV's shows and she writes nice sexual experiences for Skokie, more inventive and interesting that HBO visusex. This book recounted its heroine's experiences with hot men and danger as well as some fun Pam and Bubba moments. Sometimes they were they same event. I loved that Sookie saved the day a couple of times and that Eric flies and really takes quite good care of Sookie. Just wish I could look forward to a future in which Sookie would pick up on that once and for all and that some day they would fly together into eternity. If I talked about SKOKIE in this review, it's because my auto correct fights me about the name Ms Harris gave her heroine in this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    Best ond ye Best one yet

    Loved this one

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2013

    Absolutely......

    WONDERFUL.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    Highly recommended-it is an amazing series!

    This book series is amazing, beyond discription. I definitely recommend it as a must read! Specially for people who love fantasy/fiction, you will get completely lost and have you yearning for more!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    Beaten sensless

    Sanded faceless

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    gt Great

    This is a great book/series if you are looking for a quick, enjoyable read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2013

    Good series!

    This is my third fave book in the series. And not because it is #3.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2013

    I bought the whole series and am so sorry I wasted my money. Soo

    I bought the whole series and am so sorry I wasted my money. Sookie is completely annoying, the only entertaining point in this series so far is Eric. Although I do prefer Sookie from the book as opposed to Sookie from the show, she's even more annoying on the show!!! smh don't waste your money!!! I cannot read another book in this series and it's only book 3!!! I hate books where the heroine is so annoying, much prefer if these books were written in third person so we wouldn't have to be stuck in her head the entire time. Seriously, sometimes I think the author makes her seem like such a dumb girl and I can't stand it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Great.

    I liked this installment alot! Maybe hbo should have stuck to the story line... great read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2013

    Best books ever

    Love them all

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  • Posted December 19, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Another hit in the Sookie Stackhouse series! After watching a fe

    Another hit in the Sookie Stackhouse series! After watching a few seasons of True Blood on HBO, I had to pick up the book series. While they are a bit different
    from the series, they are highly entertaining! A+++

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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