Clusters of Galaxies, Volume 3: Carnegie Observatories Astrophysics Series: Probes of Cosmological Structure and Galaxy

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Overview

Clusters of galaxies are the largest and most massive collapsed systems in the Universe. In addition to containing thousands of galaxies, these systems contain large amounts of hot, X-ray-emitting gas and dark matter. This volume contains a series of review papers on this exciting and important astronomical topic by international leaders in the field. The work is appropriate as an introduction for physics and astronomy graduate students as well as a reference source for professionals.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

John S. Mulchaey's research has focused on groups of galaxies. In 1993, he used the ROSAT telescope to show that diffuse X-ray emission is a common feature of many galaxy groups providing some of the strongest evidence to date that such systems are dominated by dark matter. More recently he has played an important role in the discovery and study of 'fossil groups', massive systems that contain very few galaxies.

Alan Dressler has made many fundamental contributions to the study of large scale structure in the universe over the last 30 years, including the quntification of the so-called morphology-density relation in clusters. He also played a leading role in the discovery of the Great Attractor and massive black holes in nearby galaxies. More recently, he participated in the MORPHS project, using Hubble Space Telescope images to show that bursts of star formation were much more common in galaxies 5 billion years ago than they are today.

Augustus Oemler has devoted much of his research career to understanding how galaxies have evolved to their present form. In collaboration with H. Butcher, he showed that clusters at intermediate red-shifts contain a large excess of blue galaxies (now known as the Butcher-Oemler effect). As a member of the MORPHS team, Oemler has more recently been using HST to study the morphologies of galaxies in moderate red-shift clusters. He recently finished a seven year term as director of Carnegie Observatories.

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Table of Contents

Introduction; List of participants; 1. Galaxy clusters as probes of cosmology and astrophysics August E. Evrard; 2. Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Robert C. Nichol; 3. Clustering studies with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey Warrick J. Couch, Matthew M. Colless and Roberto de Propris; 4. X-ray surveys of low-redshift clusters Alastair C. Edge; 5. X-ray clusters at high redshift Piero Rosati; 6. The red sequence technique and high-redshift galaxy clusters Michael D. Gladders; 7. Probing dark matter in clusters Ian Smail; 8. Clusters of galaxies: an x-ray perspective Richard F. Mushotzky; 9. Cool gas in clusters of galaxies Megan Donahue and G. Mark Voit; 10. Using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect to probe the gas in clusters Mark Birkinshaw; 11. The formation of early-type galaxies: observations to z≈1 Tommaso Treu; 12. Evolution of early-type galaxies in clusters Marijn Franx; 13. Star-forming galaxies in clusters Alan Dressler; 14. The stellar content of galaxy clusters Roger L. Davies; 15. Modeling stellar populations in cluster galaxies Bianca M. Poggianti; 16. The chemistry of galaxy clusters Alvio Renzini; 17. Interactions and mergers of cluster galaxies J. Christopher Mihos; 18. Evolutionary processes in clusters Ben Moore; 19. Interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium Jacqueline H. van Gorkom; 20. The difference between clusters and groups: a journey from cluster cores to their outskirts and beyond Richard G. Bower and Michael L. Balogh; 21. Galaxy groups at intermediate redshift and the mechanisms of galaxy evolution Ray G. Carlberg; 22. The intragroup medium John S. Mulchaey; 23. Symposium summary Jeremiah P. Ostriker; Credits.

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