Cocaine Nation: How the White Trade Took Over the World [NOOK Book]

Overview


An in-depth look at the cocaine industry, from the streets of Colombia to the clubs of New York and London, in a Fast Food Nation-style expose of the impact of “the white trade” in our society
 

From farmers and traffickers in South America, to narcotics officers, gang-members, and end-users across the globe, Tom Feiling, an award-winning documentary film-maker, travels across the world to hear these people tell the story of cocaine as ...

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Cocaine Nation: How the White Trade Took Over the World

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Overview


An in-depth look at the cocaine industry, from the streets of Colombia to the clubs of New York and London, in a Fast Food Nation-style expose of the impact of “the white trade” in our society
 

From farmers and traffickers in South America, to narcotics officers, gang-members, and end-users across the globe, Tom Feiling, an award-winning documentary film-maker, travels across the world to hear these people tell the story of cocaine as never before. He tells the story of the development of coca and cocaine, from ancestral indigenous use, to Freud and Jung, through the present day. He looks at the supply of the drug from the Andes, through the Caribbean and Mexico, the havoc it has wreaked on those societies, how demand has changed, what it does to one’s body, and what people on all ends of the spectrum hope to gain from it. Feiling also addresses the “War on Drugs” that began in the 1990s and how its draconian methods and out-of-touch rhetoric are almost completely ineffective, and how specific legislation can help alleviate the negative impact of drug-trade world-wide.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Feiling, a documentary filmmaker who has done much work in Colombia, turns to the country’s main illegal export. (In the opening chapter, we learn about the original 19th-century coca use: “The modern-day [Coke] can’s red and white livery, taken from the colours of the Peruvian flag, is the only reminder of Coca-Cola’s Andean origins.” Studying the cultivation, distribution, and use of cocaine, he probes the drug’s meteoric rise in sales and traces traffic from Colombian coca fields to Miami, Kingston, Tijuana, London, and New York. He follows consumers, traders, producers, police officers, doctors, and custom officials. Part One analyzes the drug economy: “a lifeline for plenty of jobless Americans. Driving a car loaded with cocaine from El Paso to Chicago can earn the driver $10,000.” Crack cocaine, a cheaper form of the drug, became a booming market in the 1980s, even spreading to rural America. By 1989, Jamaican gangs supplied crack to 47 U.S. cities, while the Bloods and the Crips ran West Coast crack houses. Part Two studies suppliers, smugglers, and law enforcement. Concluding chapters debate drug education, treatment programs, and legalization issues. Packed with facts and figures, this is a well-researched survey of the subject. (July)
Kirkus Reviews
Documentary filmmaker Feiling delivers a harrowing treatise on the seemingly invincible cocaine industry. The author makes an important contribution to the general understanding of this popular stimulant by dispensing the history and lore surrounding the mythical coca leaf and addressing abuse, transport and policy issues alongside hopeful solutions. Cocaine's ascent to popularity is accentuated by the mention of Abraham Lincoln's purchase of a coca wine product called "Cocoaine" in 1860, along with the rise of the euphorically addictive "Mariani wine." Surprisingly, writes Feiling, it was alcohol consumption that worried officials most as it widely surpassed cocaine in becoming the No. 1 "terrible threat" to the general public. The emergence and attractiveness of smoking crack cocaine is attributed to the drug's triple threat of availability, affordability and "the most intense sense of being alive the user will ever enjoy." Feiling scrutinizes drug policies, anti-drug initiatives, stringent sanctions and prohibition tactics with crisp, insightful rhetoric, commenting that while the "primordial conflict between good and evil" waged between police and drug traffickers is honorable and necessary, its efficacy remains questionable. The author notes that the countless American agencies charged with curtailing the drug's interchange have created "institutionalized buck-passing on a global scale." The drug's infiltration into schools and workplaces poses a threat, as well, to an emerging generation, damaging economic stability as much, Feiling contends, as the legalization mentality does. The author's travels to Colombia, Mexico, America and Jamaica provide a panoramic view of the many locales where cocaine is processed, shipped and negotiated. Feiling also includes interviews with drug dealers, cocaine addicts, traffickers and law-enforcement officials, all of whom have varying opinions on cocaine's effect on the national psyche. An arresting, fact-laden crash course on one of America's recreational drugs of choice. Agent: Broo Doherty/Wade & Doherty Literary Agency
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453217795
  • Publisher: Pegasus Books
  • Publication date: 6/14/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 356
  • Sales rank: 780,634
  • File size: 593 KB

Meet the Author


Tom Feiling is an award-winning documentary filmmaker. He spent a year working in South America, where he made Resistencia: Hip-Hop in Colombia, which won numerous awards around the world. He now lives in London, where he is a director for “Justice for Colombia,” which defends human rights in Colombia. 
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 2, 2011

    Very good history of cocaine trade. Provocative and extremely interesing.

    This was a very interesting and thorough book on history of cocaine. Easy to read and well researched.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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