Cock-A-Moo-Moo by Juliet Dallas-Conte, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Cock-A-Moo-Moo

Cock-A-Moo-Moo

by Juliet Dallas-Conte
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
This witty, rhythmic yarn introduces one very confused rooster. As the story opens, Rooster has forgotten how to crow: "When the sun came up in the morning, he took a deep breath and shouted... `Cock-a-Moo-Moo.' " Painted with large grainy brushstrokes in glowing colors, Bartlett's (A Story for Hippo) deceptively childlike opening spread establishes a spontaneous folkloric feel. Rooster continues to mimic the calls of his fellow farm animals ("Cock-a-Quack-Quack" and "Cock-a-Oink-Oink"); a predictable pattern of censure ("That's not right!") and correction ("Only cows go moo") encourages children to chime in. Debut author Dallas-Cont times the plot developments just right: Rooster's eventual vow never to crow again lasts only until a fox gets ready to raid the henhouse, when Rooster's noisy response turns him into a barnyard hero. Viewed mostly at close range, Bartlett's animals bustle around the pages, exuding the energy Dallas-Cont 's writing suggests. Lots of fun. Ages 2-6. (Apr.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Juliet Dallas-Conte's picture book tells about a rooster who forgets how he is supposed to crow. Is it cock-a-moo-moo or cock-a-quack-quack? Poor Rooster must set out to discover through interaction with other animals on the farm the proper crow of a rooster. Each animal group impolitely points out his errors. Then, he feels discouraged because he cannot remember nor will anyone tell him how to crow. The climax of the story comes when a fox sneaks into the henhouse at night, and Rooster must alert the other animals. He still cannot remember the exact way of crowing but does manage to get the attention of his fellow farm animals by making their respective noises. Rooster becomes a hero to all the other animals and finally, at the end, remembers how to crow. The remarkable illustrations in this book really help to bring the animals alive. The book not only teaches children a good message not to fret about the small things in life, but it also helps bring together animal sounds and pictures. It is not necessarily important what sound Rooster makes; it is important that he simply makes enough noise to awaken the animals. In addition, the text is very easy for small children to understand. This book would be a wonderful choice for young children due to its use of onomatopoeia and vivid illustrations that help to bring alive the animals in the story. 2001, Macmillan,
— Melissa Rogers
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Rooster has forgotten how to crow. One morning he greets the sun by calling, "Cock-a-moo-moo!" After the cows remind him that only cows moo, he attempts to wake the barnyard with sounds of cock-a-quack-quack, cock-a-oink-oink, and cock-a-baa-baa. The ducks, pigs, and sheep point out his errors and the other chickens tell him that he is "getting it all wrong," and Rooster sadly decides that he will never crow again. But, that night, when the rest of the farm is sleeping, a fox sneaks into the henhouse. Mooing, quacking, oinking, and baaing, the heroic fowl wakes all the other creatures and they chase away the intruder. A proud rooster then crows, "cock-a-doodle-doo!" And he never gets it wrong again. With its breezy text, thoughtful pacing, and bouncing rhythm, Cock-a-Moo-Moo is an ideal read-aloud. The book lends itself to participation, and children will surely join in on Rooster's mixed-up crows. Bartlett's lush, sunny paintings and the playful design make the full-page spreads seem to quiver with energy. Pair this title with Bernard Most's Cock-a-Doodle-Moo! (Harcourt, 1996) to add a bit of humor and merriment to farm and animal-sound storytimes.-Shawn Brommer, South Central Library System, Madison, WI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Puffing up his chest and opening his beak, Rooster prepares to greet the dawn with a resounding crow, but he seems to have forgotten how to do it. "Cock-a-Moo-Moo!" he calls, but the cows tell him that only cows moo. "Cock-a-Quack-Quack!" he crows, but the ducks insist that only ducks should quack. Trying twice more, he is told by the pigs and sheep that roosters should definitely not oink or say baa. Discouraged and embarrassed, Rooster vows never to crow again. That night, a fox steals into the henhouse. Rooster sounds the alarm the only way he knows how. "Cock-a-Moo-Moo! Cock-a-Quack-Quack! Cock-a-Oink-Oink! Cock-a-Baa-Baa!" he shouts, waking all of the animals and driving the dangerous fox away. Celebrating his bravery, all the animals tell Rooster what a hero he is. The proud rooster puffs up his chest once more and shouts "Cock-a-Doodle-Doo!" Illustrations rendered in vibrant colors and bold, textural brushstrokes make this a delightful and amusing tale of one rooster's courage and determination. Readers will be mooing, oinking, and eventually crowing right along with this one. (Picture book. 2-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780333947531
Publisher:
Pan Macmillan
Publication date:
03/08/2002
Edition description:
New
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.20(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >