×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0 / Edition 2
     

Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0 / Edition 2

5.0 2
by Lawrence Lessig
 

See All Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0465039146

ISBN-13: 9780465039142

Pub. Date: 12/28/2006

Publisher: Basic Books

There's a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated-that it is, in its very essence, immune from the government's (or anyone else's) control. Code, first published in 2000, argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulable; cyberspace has no “nature.” It only has code-the software and

Overview

There's a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated-that it is, in its very essence, immune from the government's (or anyone else's) control. Code, first published in 2000, argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulable; cyberspace has no “nature.” It only has code-the software and hardware that make cyberspace what it is. That code can create a place of freedom-as the original architecture of the Net did-or a place of oppressive control. Under the influence of commerce, cyberspace is becoming a highly regulable space, where behavior is much more tightly controlled than in real space. But that's not inevitable either. We can-we must-choose what kind of cyberspace we want and what freedoms we will guarantee. These choices are all about architecture: about what kind of code will govern cyberspace, and who will control it. In this realm, code is the most significant form of law, and it is up to lawyers, policymakers, and especially citizens to decide what values that code embodies. Since its original publication, this seminal book has earned the status of a minor classic. This second edition, or Version 2.0, has been prepared through the author's wiki, a web site that allows readers to edit the text, making this the first reader-edited revision of a popular book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465039142
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
12/28/2006
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
1,396,086
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Prefaceix
Part 1Regulability
Chapter 1Code Is Law3
Chapter 2Four Puzzles from Cyberspace9
Chapter 3Is-Ism24
Chapter 4Architectures of Control30
Chapter 5Regulating Code43
Part 2Code and Other Regulators
Chapter 6Cyberspaces63
Chapter 7What Things Regulate85
Chapter 8The Limits in Open Code100
Part 3Applications
Chapter 9Translation111
Chapter 10Intellectual Property122
Chapter 11Privacy142
Chapter 12Free Speech164
Chapter 13Interlude186
Chapter 14Sovereignty188
Part 4Responses
Chapter 15The Problems We Face213
Chapter 16Responses222
Chapter 17What Declan Doesn't Get231
Appendix235
Notes241
Index289

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Code: And Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Before Larry Lessig began teaching a course on ¿cyberlaw¿ in the 1990s, few people knew this awkward term for ¿regulation of the Internet.¿ But Lessig, now a professor at Stanford Law School, has always kept close to the bleeding edge of technology. He started programming in high school and later helped the U.S. Supreme Court go digital. Even this book¿s development shows the author¿s geek //bona fides:// He revised it using a ¿wiki,¿ a software platform that allows multiple users to edit the text simultaneously via the Web. While the book¿s details have changed a bit since the first edition, Lessig¿s main point is the same. Because of its design, the Internet is perhaps the most ¿regulable¿ entity imaginable and, unless its users are careful, it will morph into something that diminishes, rather than enhances, liberty. Moreover, trying to keep the Internet ¿unregulated¿ is folly. While this book is sometimes bloated and repetitive, we find that it is still required reading for anyone who cares about the social impact of the most important technology since electrification.