Coercive Cooperation: Explaining Multilateral Economic Sanctions

Overview

This innovative study shows that multilateral sanctions are coercive in their pressure on their target and in their origin: the sanctions themselves frequently result from coercive policies, with one state attempting to coerce others through persuasion, threats, and promises. To analyze this process, Lisa Martin uses a novel methodology combining game-theoretic models, statistical analysis, and case studies. She emphasizes that credible commitments gain international cooperation, and concludes that the ...

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Overview

This innovative study shows that multilateral sanctions are coercive in their pressure on their target and in their origin: the sanctions themselves frequently result from coercive policies, with one state attempting to coerce others through persuasion, threats, and promises. To analyze this process, Lisa Martin uses a novel methodology combining game-theoretic models, statistical analysis, and case studies. She emphasizes that credible commitments gain international cooperation, and concludes that the involvement of international institutions and the willingness of the main "sender" to bear heavy costs are the central factors influencing the sanction's credibility.

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Editorial Reviews

Harvard International Review
As Martin acknowledges at the end of her fine scholarly book—a sophisticated conceptual approach matched to a well-articulated argument—more study needs to be given to the actual politics and to the psychology of international sanctions.
— Alan K. Henrickson
Choice
A major theoretical and substantive contribution to the study of international cooperation and the imposition of economic sanctions.
Harvard International Review - Alan K. Henrickson
As Martin acknowledges at the end of her fine scholarly book—a sophisticated conceptual approach matched to a well-articulated argument—more study needs to be given to the actual politics and to the psychology of international sanctions.
From the Publisher

"As Martin acknowledges at the end of her fine scholarly book--a sophisticated conceptual approach matched to a well-articulated argument--more study needs to be given to the actual politics and to the psychology of international sanctions."--Alan K. Henrickson, Harvard International Review

"A major theoretical and substantive contribution to the study of international cooperation and the imposition of economic sanctions."--Choice

"A major theoretical and substantive contribution to the study of international cooperation and the imposition of economic sanctions."--Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691034768
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 12/27/1993
  • Pages: 324
  • Product dimensions: 6.13 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Table of Contents

Figures
Tables
Preface
1 Introduction 3
The Study of Economic Sanctions 4
The Study of International Cooperation 7
Methodology 10
Pt. 1 Theory and Data 13
2 Model and Hypotheses 15
A Model of Economic Sanctions 16
Identifying Cooperation Problems 25
What Explains Cooperation? 31
Bandwagoning 40
3 Measuring Cooperation and Explanatory Variables 46
Measurement and Description: The Dependent Variable 46
Measurement and Description: Explanatory Variables 54
4 Estimating Models of Cooperation 61
Regression Analysis 62
Ordered-Probit Analysis 67
Event-Count Analysis 74
The Effect of Declining Hegemony 86
Pt. 2 Case Studies 93
5 Human Rights in Latin America: Explaining Unilateral U.S. Sanctions 99
Congress versus the President: U.S. Human-Rights Policy, 1973-76 101
The Carter Administration 106
Economic Sanctions and the Multilateral Development Banks 111
Attitudes and Responses to U.S. Human-Rights Sanctions 119
Pinochet's Chile: U.S. Leadership or Resistance? 124
6 The Falkland Islands Conflict 131
The Falklands Crisis, 1982 132
The Falklands and the European Community 138
Sanctions and War: The Case of Ireland 153
Responses of the United States, Latin America, and Others 159
7 Western Technology-Export Controls 169
American, European, and Japanese Views on East-West Technology Transfer 171
Institutional Coordination of Export Controls: CoCom 185
Responding to the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan, 1980 191
Responding to Dissident Trials, 1978 198
8 The Polish Crisis and Gas-Pipeline Sanctions 204
Martial Law in Poland and the Siberian Gas Pipeline 206
The Effect of Declining Hegemony 225
Siberian Gas and European Preferences 228
The Grain Embargo: Why It Mattered 234
9 Conclusion 241
Explaining International Cooperation on Economic Sanctions 241
Additional Findings 247
Implications for Theories of International Cooperation and Economic Sanctions 248
Notes 253
Bibliography 277
Index 293
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