The Coffee Book: Anatomy of an Industry from Crop to the Last Drop

The Coffee Book: Anatomy of an Industry from Crop to the Last Drop

by Nina Luttinger, Gregory Dicum
     
 

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A freshly updated edition of the best introduction to one of the world’s most popular products, The Coffee Book is jammed full of facts, figures, cartoons, and commentary covering coffee from its first use in Ethiopia in the sixth century to the rise of Starbucks and the emergence of Fair Trade coffee in the twenty-first. The book explores the process of

Overview

A freshly updated edition of the best introduction to one of the world’s most popular products, The Coffee Book is jammed full of facts, figures, cartoons, and commentary covering coffee from its first use in Ethiopia in the sixth century to the rise of Starbucks and the emergence of Fair Trade coffee in the twenty-first. The book explores the process of cultivation, harvesting, and roasting from bean to cup; surveys the social history of café society from the first coffeehouses in Constantinople to beatnik havens in Berkeley and Greenwich Village; and tells the dramatic tale of high-stakes international trade and speculation for a product that can make or break entire national economies. It also examines the industry’s major players, revealing how they have systematically reduced the quality of the bean and turned a much-loved product into a commodity and lifestyle accoutrement, ruining the lives of millions of farmers around the world in the process.

Finally, The Coffee Book, hailed as a Best Business Book by Library Journal when it was first published, considers the exploitation of labor and damage to the environment that mass cultivation causes, and explores the growing “conscious coffee” market and Fair Trade movement.

Editorial Reviews

Economist
...[W]hat is most intriguing is the authors’ emphasis on coffee’s role in attracting and fomenting unrest. In contrast with alcohol, they argue, coffee encourages clear thinking — and that, they suggest, is as great a threat as any to tyrants....Indeed, the very arrival of the coffee-house — a public place for all classes to gather, exchange gossip and debate the great issues of the day — was in itself a force for change.
Booknews
An overview of the production, consumption, and cultural popularity of coffee, providing an historical overview of the drink, tracing its farming and processing, examining the international trade in coffee, and discussing marketing and the recent growth in popularity of specialty coffees. The final chapter discusses the even more recent consumer movement against the coffee trade's exploitive impact on both the environment and labor in developing nations. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)
The Economist
...[W]hat is most intriguing is the authors' emphasis on coffee's role in attracting and fomenting unrest. In contrast with alcohol, they argue, coffee encourages clear thinking — and that, they suggest, is as great a threat as any to tyrants....Indeed, the very arrival of the coffee-house — a public place for all classes to gather, exchange gossip and debate the great issues of the day — was in itself a force for change.
From the Publisher

"Most stimulating."
The Baltimore Sun

"Informed and argumentative. . . . Drawing on sources ranging from Molière and beatnik cartoonists to the Food and Agriculture Organization, the authors describe the beverage’s long and colorful rise to ubiquity."
The Economist

"Packed with an interesting punch . . . a fun little item."
—Associated Press

"Good to the last sentence."
Las Cruces(NM)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595587244
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
05/10/2011
Series:
Bazaar Book
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
232
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Author of Window Seat, Gregory Dicum has written for the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, Salon, Travel + Leisure, New York, and Mother Jones. He is a contributing editor at Other magazine and writes a biweekly column for the San Francisco Chronicle. Nina Luttinger has worked as a private coffee and tea industry consultant and freelance writer and at TransFair USA. They live in San Francisco.

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