Cold as Ice: A True Story of Murder, Disappearance, and the Multiple Lives of Drew Peterson [NOOK Book]

Overview

***Please note: This ebook edition does not contain the photos found in the print edition.***

Kathleen Savio was married to Drew Peterson for eleven years before filing for divorce in 2003. The next year, she was found dead in her bathtub. Her drowning appeared to be an accident—and for years, no one had reason to question it. But when Peterson’s next wife, Stacy—thirty years younger—went missing, the tough-talking and wise-cracking former Illinois cop came under suspicion….

...

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Cold as Ice: A True Story of Murder, Disappearance, and the Multiple Lives of Drew Peterson

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Overview

***Please note: This ebook edition does not contain the photos found in the print edition.***

Kathleen Savio was married to Drew Peterson for eleven years before filing for divorce in 2003. The next year, she was found dead in her bathtub. Her drowning appeared to be an accident—and for years, no one had reason to question it. But when Peterson’s next wife, Stacy—thirty years younger—went missing, the tough-talking and wise-cracking former Illinois cop came under suspicion….

With Stacy Peterson missing—and presumed dead—authorities exhumed Kathleen Savio’s body, looking for answers. A new autopsy pointed to homicide, and a 2002 letter was revealed in which Savio wrote that Drew, “knows how to manipulate the system, and his next step is to take my children away. Or kill me instead.” He was arrested for Kathleen’s murder, and is a prime suspect in Stacy’s disappearance, Peterson continues to protest his innocence. New York Times bestselling author Carlton Smith digs deep into the mystery behind the two Peterson wives—and sheds some light on one of the most complex crime cases in modern American history.


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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429929400
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 8/31/2010
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 158,837
  • File size: 281 KB

Meet the Author


Carlton Smith wrote the New York Times bestselling The Search for the Green River Killer. An award-winning journalist for The Los Angeles Times and The Seattle Times during the 1970s and 1980s, he was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting in 1988. His books include Mind Games, Cold Blooded, The Prom Night Murders, and In the Arms of Evil. There are more than two million copies of his books in print.

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Read an Excerpt


The Circus: 2007
There is a perfectly rational excuse for the newspersons’ seeming callousness: stories change with each retelling. Even a person really trying for the most faithful recital of events is almost invariably susceptible to slight modifications, certain little embellishments, with each recital. Accuracy of a story is in direct relation to how soon after the event it is recorded, and how frequently the story has been retold.
—Walter Cronkite, A Reporter’s Life (1996)
1.
“Did You Murder Your Wife?”
So there they were, phalanxes of camera wielders, light techs, earphoned sound mavens, harried producers and their teenage sandwich holders, along with their fronts, the beautiful people perfectly coifed and clad, with makeup and microphones and pre-scripted nosy questions usually compiled by their cigarette-smoking behind-the-scenes producers who thought they knew what sold, but whose own visages were too real or too old to make the photographic cut. The rolling carnival came from broadcasters, cable networks, radio stations, bloggers, and even a few newspapers.
The media gaggle overran the short cul-de-sac and choked it off from normal suburban life. There were no tricycles or skateboards on this particular day—the neighborhood kids were outside the media perimeter, ogling in the background as the event unfolded.
Sometime in the afternoon, while the light was still good, the man of the hour finally emerged from his two-story house, looked around, and grinned. He held up a video camera and panned the scene, recording the media mob recording him. The crowd of so-called “content providers” went wild with hilarity.
The amateur reeled off a few quips, grinning. The reporters were gratified. It didn’t much matter to them what the man with the camera actually said, only that they had the image of him taking pictures of them, the picture itself telling the whole story. “Did you get it?” a producer would demand of the cameraperson. The amateur with the video camera smiled and went back inside his house. He had what he wanted: visual proof positive that the electronic media marauders had invaded his privacy, had invaded his life, had destroyed his suburban neighborhood, which made it almost impossible for him to get a fair trial, if it ever came to that. It was the dark side of being under the spotlight, of being In the News.
As it happened, a little before Halloween in 2007, a report came to the attention of someone who was likely a twenty-something producer for a cable network headquartered in New York, Washington or Atlanta, scanning local news feeds from around the country. He or she probably recognized the “elements,” as they’re called in the news racket: a young mother, very attractive, vanished mysteriously. Cue the spider webs, the jack-o-lanterns, the costumes, the candy, the kids. Is this a story for the mythical national village, or what?
The vanisher was twenty-three-year-old Stacy Peterson, mother of Anthony, then four, and daughter Lacy, then almost three, as well as stepmother to two older children of her husband, Drew Peterson, a small-town cop in the suburb of Bolingbrook, a former bean field some miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. Stacy was cute, white, easy on the eyes: definitely a qualifier, as far as the national media calculated its ratings demographics. And of course there were the little kids—where’s Mommy?
Once the first cable network’s researchers understood that Drew Peterson had been the husband of another woman who had been found dead in a bathtub more than three years earlier, in which the circumstances of death were in dispute, the starting gun fired.
By the time the entire saga had saturated the nation over the next two years, as many as six hundred people had become potential, if peripheral, witnesses, and the responsible authorities were left to separate the grains of truth from the chaff of media-driven gossip. It was a classic example of how a small story, without many facts, becomes a big story almost overnight, driven by modern media speculation.
Welcome to the unhappy new world of Drew Peterson, retired small-town cop, suspect in two, maybe even three or four murders.
Excerpted from Cold As Ice by Carlton Smith.
Copyright © 2010 by Carlton Smith.
Published in September 2010 by St. Martin’S Paperbacks.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.
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First Chapter

Cold as Ice

A True Story of Murder, Disappearance, and the Multiple Lives of Drew Peterson
By Carlton Smith

St. Martin's True Crime

Copyright © 2010 Carlton Smith
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780312388843

The Circus: 2007
There is a perfectly rational excuse for the newspersons’ seeming callousness: stories change with each retelling. Even a person really trying for the most faithful recital of events is almost invariably susceptible to slight modifications, certain little embellishments, with each recital. Accuracy of a story is in direct relation to how soon after the event it is recorded, and how frequently the story has been retold.
—Walter Cronkite, A Reporter’s Life (1996)
1.
“Did You Murder Your Wife?”
So there they were, phalanxes of camera wielders, light techs, earphoned sound mavens, harried producers and their teenage sandwich holders, along with their fronts, the beautiful people perfectly coifed and clad, with makeup and microphones and pre-scripted nosy questions usually compiled by their cigarette-smoking behind-the-scenes producers who thought they knew what sold, but whose own visages were too real or too old to make the photographic cut. The rolling carnival came from broadcasters, cable networks, radio stations, bloggers, and even a few newspapers.
The media gaggle overran the short cul-de-sac and choked it off from normal suburban life. There were no tricycles or skateboards on this particular day—the neighborhood kids were outside the media perimeter, ogling in the background as the event unfolded.
Sometime in the afternoon, while the light was still good, the man of the hour finally emerged from his two-story house, looked around, and grinned. He held up a video camera and panned the scene, recording the media mob recording him. The crowd of so-called “content providers” went wild with hilarity.
The amateur reeled off a few quips, grinning. The reporters were gratified. It didn’t much matter to them what the man with the camera actually said, only that they had the image of him taking pictures of them, the picture itself telling the whole story. “Did you get it?” a producer would demand of the cameraperson. The amateur with the video camera smiled and went back inside his house. He had what he wanted: visual proof positive that the electronic media marauders had invaded his privacy, had invaded his life, had destroyed his suburban neighborhood, which made it almost impossible for him to get a fair trial, if it ever came to that. It was the dark side of being under the spotlight, of being In the News.
As it happened, a little before Halloween in 2007, a report came to the attention of someone who was likely a twenty-something producer for a cable network headquartered in New York, Washington or Atlanta, scanning local news feeds from around the country. He or she probably recognized the “elements,” as they’re called in the news racket: a young mother, very attractive, vanished mysteriously. Cue the spider webs, the jack-o-lanterns, the costumes, the candy, the kids. Is this a story for the mythical national village, or what?
The vanisher was twenty-three-year-old Stacy Peterson, mother of Anthony, then four, and daughter Lacy, then almost three, as well as stepmother to two older children of her husband, Drew Peterson, a small-town cop in the suburb of Bolingbrook, a former bean field some miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. Stacy was cute, white, easy on the eyes: definitely a qualifier, as far as the national media calculated its ratings demographics. And of course there were the little kids—where’s Mommy?
Once the first cable network’s researchers understood that Drew Peterson had been the husband of another woman who had been found dead in a bathtub more than three years earlier, in which the circumstances of death were in dispute, the starting gun fired.
By the time the entire saga had saturated the nation over the next two years, as many as six hundred people had become potential, if peripheral, witnesses, and the responsible authorities were left to separate the grains of truth from the chaff of media-driven gossip. It was a classic example of how a small story, without many facts, becomes a big story almost overnight, driven by modern media speculation.
Welcome to the unhappy new world of Drew Peterson, retired small-town cop, suspect in two, maybe even three or four murders.
Excerpted from Cold As Ice by Carlton Smith.
Copyright © 2010 by Carlton Smith.
Published in September 2010 by St. Martin’S Paperbacks.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.


Continues...

Excerpted from Cold as Ice by Carlton Smith Copyright © 2010 by Carlton Smith. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 17, 2011

    Wait for it to become a 99 cent book.

    The author of this book devotes PAGES of dialogue from TV news shows on this case. Who wants to read all that? It's like reading pages of court transcripts. BORING! This is a hot case here in Illinois right now and this book should be a little more interesting.
    Aren't authors supposed to check and re-check their facts when writing a book? The author refers to Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed as 'he" or "him" several times. Michael Sneed is a woman!
    Is Carlton a he or she?

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Good book!!

    I at times, found it hard to put down. There were a lot of he said, she said comments and third party conversation.... I only hope the movie UNTOUCHABLE, airing 1/21/12 on lifetime is just as good!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 24, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    For such a sensational case, this author could have done SO much

    For such a sensational case, this author could have done SO much more with the book. There were chapters dedicated to information from previous books written about this case. Ugh, I am so disappointed with this book. The writing style is extremely repetitive; saying the same information over and over again in the SAME chapter, half of the information in this book is from other authors who have already written about the case, there are NO dramatic pictures as stated on the cover, and there is simply no ending; we never find out what happened and instead need to go read about the outcome of the case online. I would wait for another book about the Peterson case to come out and skip this one. Normally I would not write such a low scoring review but with this book I had no choice

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2013

    Help

    Icepack heeeelp

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    NO PICTURE

    There are no pictures included which is dumb because I really wanted to see it:( Great book but too much news media dialog

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2012

    Greenwhisker

    *she smiled and nodded back*~ Greenwhiser

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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