Cold: Adventures in the World's Frozen Places

Cold: Adventures in the World's Frozen Places

2.8 21
by Bill Streever
     
 

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From avalanches to glaciers, from seals to snowflakes, and from Shackleton's expedition to "The Year Without Summer," Bill Streever journeys through history, myth, geography, and ecology in a year-long search for cold--real, icy, 40-below cold. In July he finds it while taking a dip in a 35-degree Arctic swimming hole; in September while excavating our planet's… See more details below

Overview

From avalanches to glaciers, from seals to snowflakes, and from Shackleton's expedition to "The Year Without Summer," Bill Streever journeys through history, myth, geography, and ecology in a year-long search for cold--real, icy, 40-below cold. In July he finds it while taking a dip in a 35-degree Arctic swimming hole; in September while excavating our planet's ancient and not so ancient ice ages; and in October while exploring hibernation habits in animals, from humans to wood frogs to bears.

A scientist whose passion for cold runs red hot, Streever is a wondrous guide: he conjures woolly mammoth carcasses and the ice-age Clovis tribe from melting glaciers, and he evokes blizzards so wild readers may freeze--limb by vicarious limb.

Editorial Reviews

Dwight Garner
This crisp and bracing little book …is an unusual and welcome addition to the literature of cold weather and the great north…one that moves easily from geography and biology to history, myth and folklore. Mr. Streever's writing style feels original and organic: it is flinty and tough-minded, with just enough humor glowing around the edges to keep you toasty and dry.
—The New York Times
David Laskin
Streever demonstrates an amazing zeal for collecting cold facts. If it hibernates, shivers, glaciates, migrates to the poles, skis, feels compelled to reach Ultima Thule or absolute zero, Streever is hot on its trail. His attention span may be somewhat limited—he prefers skimming along crystalline surfaces to probing gelid depths—but his voice is so engaging and his writing so crisp that I was usually happy to keep him company wherever he zigzagged. Certainly, I was never bored.
—The Washington Post
Mary Roach
I've probably read some of this elsewhere, but Streever explains in a way that makes things stick…He sculptures lucid explanations and fires them with fine writing…Cold is a love song to science and scientists, to Earth and everything that lives on and flies over and tunnels under it. It's impossible to read the book and not fully realize that our planet must be protected.
—The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly

Cold weather systems the earth needs to thrive is the subject of Streever's well-documented book, using all of the author's expertise from his field trips to the world's most frigid environments. Streever, who chairs the North Slope Science Initiative's Science Technical Advisory Panel, writes of the frostiest experience: "We fail to see cold for what it is: the absence of heat, the slowing of molecular motion, a sensation, a perception, a driving force." Rather than giving the reader a dry, academic lecture on snow, glaciers, wind-chill factors and icebergs, he delivers a poetic, anecdotal narrative complete with polar expeditions, Ice Age mysteries, igloos, permafrost and hailstorms. Two of the most fascinating segments are the arduous task of scientific reconstruction of past climates and the magical navigation of migratory birds to warmer lands. This is a wonderful collection of one man's first-rate observations and commentary about the history and importance of cold to the earth and its occupants. (July)

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Library Journal

Open this book to any page and be treated to a tidbit about the cold, its effects on animals, on history, on the world. Do frogs and caterpillars actually freeze solid and then revive in spring? Have you ever heard of the School Children's Blizzard that froze cattle standing in place? What is the difference between hypothermia and frostbite? Biologist Streever explores benign cold, threatening cold, and monstrous/scary cold not only through history and science books but also in person, in Alaska and other frozen spots around the world. The author knows what he is talking about. He has worked in Arctic Alaska and chairs the Science Technical Advisory Panel of the North Slope Science Initiative. This reviewer found Streever's book more consistently enticing than Mariana Gosnell's Ice: The Nature, the History, and the Uses of an Astonishing Substance. Written in a popular, accessible style, Streever's book also includes 34 pages of notes. Recommended for public libraries.
—Betty Galbraith

Kirkus Reviews
An unexpectedly fascinating look into a seemingly banal subject. Alaska-based biologist Streever spent a year documenting the nature and science of cold. "Cold is a part of day-to-day life," he writes, "but we often isolate ourselves from it, hiding in overheated houses and retreating to overheated climates, all without understanding what we so eagerly avoid." With simple prose and a strikingly immediate present tense, the author carves landscapes, scientific processes and neat anthropological factoids out of the ice, a style guaranteed to transport readers into the unfamiliar-indeed, otherworldly-dimensions he describes. Streever, who uses science as a launching point for discussions of some of history's most memorable events, renders complicated biological theories eminently understandable. His treatment of 1815, "The Year without Summer," pieces together the seemingly unrelated events of an Indonesian volcano eruption, the origins of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and the founding of the Mormon Church in a passage that will leave readers wholly impressed by the scope of the author's grasp on his subject. There's humor, too, in deftly crafted witticisms that pop up throughout the text: "When one reads past the stoicism and heroics, the history of polar exploration becomes one long accident report mixed with one long obituary"; "Cold, really, is like malaria. If it does not kill you, it will help you lose weight." With aplomb, Streever charts a meandering course of the land around him, providing an enthralling tour through haunting arctic tundra, permafrost tunnels of 40,000-year-old ice and the winter dens of hibernating beasts. A seamless blend of travelogue, history and scientifictreatise. Agent: Elizabeth Wales/Wales Literary Agency
Mary Roach
COLD is a love song to science and scientists, to Earth and everything that lives on and flies over and tunnels underneath it.
New York Times Book Review (cover review)
Mary Roach - New York Times Book Review (cover review)
"COLD is a love song to science and scientists, to Earth and everything that lives on and flies over and tunnels underneath it."
From the Publisher
"COLD is a love song to science and scientists, to Earth and everything that lives on and flies over and tunnels underneath it."—Mary Roach, New York Times Book Review (cover review)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316052467
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
07/22/2009
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
761,102
File size:
3 MB

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