Cold Fact [CD Reissue]

Cold Fact [CD Reissue]

by Rodriguez
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

There was a mini-genre of singer/songwriters in the late '60s and early '70s that has never gotten a name. They were folky but not exactly folk-rock and certainly not laid-back; sometimes pissed off but not full of rage; alienated but not incoherent; psychedelic-tinged but not that weird; not averse to using orchestration in some cases but not that elaborately

Overview

There was a mini-genre of singer/songwriters in the late '60s and early '70s that has never gotten a name. They were folky but not exactly folk-rock and certainly not laid-back; sometimes pissed off but not full of rage; alienated but not incoherent; psychedelic-tinged but not that weird; not averse to using orchestration in some cases but not that elaborately produced. And they sold very few records, eluding to a large degree even rediscovery by collectors. Jeff Monn, Paul Martin, John Braheny, and Billy Joe Becoat were some of them, and Sixto Rodriguez was another on his 1970 LP, Cold Fact. Imagine an above-average Dylanesque street busker managing to record an album with fairly full and imaginative arrangements, and you're somewhat close to the atmosphere. Rodriguez projected the image of the aloof, alienated folk-rock songwriter, his songs jammed with gentle, stream-of-consciousness, indirect putdowns of straight society and its tensions. Likewise, he had his problems with romance, simultaneously putting down (again gently) women for their hang-ups and intimating that he could get along without them anyway ("I wonder how many times you had sex, and I wonder do you know who'll be next" he chides in the lilting "I Wonder"). At the same time, the songs were catchy and concise, with dabs of inventive backup: a dancing string section here, odd electronic yelps there, tinkling steel drums elsewhere. It's an album whose lyrics are evocative yet hard to get a handle on even after repeated listenings, with song titles like "Hate Street Dialogue," "Inner City Blues" (not the Marvin Gaye tune), and "Crucify Your Mind" representative of his eccentric, slightly troubled mindset. As it goes with folk-rock-psych singer/songwriters possessing captivating non sequitur turns of the phrase, he's just behind Arthur Lee and Skip Spence, but still worth your consideration.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/19/2008
Label:
Light In The Attic
UPC:
0826853003629
catalogNumber:
36
Rank:
4097

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Rodriguez   Primary Artist
Dennis Coffey   Electric Guitar
Mike Theodore   Keyboards
Bob Babbitt   Bass
Gordon Staples   Leader

Technical Credits

Dennis Coffey   Arranger,Producer,Liner Notes,Archival Materials
Mike Theodore   Arranger,Producer,Engineer,Liner Notes,String Arrangements,Brass Arrangment,Archival Materials
Ray Hall   Remixing
Clarence Avant   Archival Materials
John K. Samson   Archival Materials
Nancy Chester   Cover Design
Josh Wright   Executive Producer
Chris Ferraro   Executive Producer
Kevin Howes   Essay
Vincent Cook   Graphic Design
Tim Forster   Archival Materials

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >