Cold Roses

( 6 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
In an age where cockiness seems to be the deadliest sin for a rock performer, Ryan Adams takes great joy in boasting of his titanic talent -- a habit that might be annoying if he didn't also follow the path of Muhammad Ali, who once noted, "It ain't bragging if you can back it up." This two-disc set -- the first of three planned 2005 releases -- readily affirms the singer-songwriter's high self-esteem, seeing how much he stretches his stylistic wings. In contrast to his previous album, an electrically charged homage to Rock N Roll, Cold Roses, could be dubbed Adams's "hippie" album, rife as it is with languid melodies, loping guitar lines, and mellowed-out delivery. ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David Sprague
In an age where cockiness seems to be the deadliest sin for a rock performer, Ryan Adams takes great joy in boasting of his titanic talent -- a habit that might be annoying if he didn't also follow the path of Muhammad Ali, who once noted, "It ain't bragging if you can back it up." This two-disc set -- the first of three planned 2005 releases -- readily affirms the singer-songwriter's high self-esteem, seeing how much he stretches his stylistic wings. In contrast to his previous album, an electrically charged homage to Rock N Roll, Cold Roses, could be dubbed Adams's "hippie" album, rife as it is with languid melodies, loping guitar lines, and mellowed-out delivery. The latter element is most surprising, particularly the ethereal, Grateful Dead–styled amble Adams adopts for "Easy Plateau" and the loping folkiness that drapes "Sweet Illusions," a nod to Harvest-era Neil Young. Even the country-tinged offerings -- which Adams embraces more lovingly here than he has in years -- seem more suited for a quiet cabin in the woods than a rowdy roadhouse, especially "Let It Ride," one of three songs to feature the vocals of Rachael Yamagata. The album isn't strictly given over to summer-of-love sweetness, of course -- Adams is too surly to let that happen -- and rockers like the ragged-but-right love paean "Beautiful Sorta" caffeinate the proceedings often enough to prove that. Cold Roses, however, isn't about working up a sweat, it's about self-assessment -- a look in the mirror in the cold light of day. And fittingly for a restless rocker, Adams uses these songs to admit that he doesn't always like what he sees.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Last time we received a dispatch from Ryan Adams, the self-styled savior of rock & roll, it was in 2003, when he delivered his straight-up rock & roll record aptly titled Rock N Roll and his two-part mope-rock EP later combined as one LP Love Is Hell. Admirable records both, but not quite the sequel to Heartbreaker that fans craved. They also weren't quite as successful as all the hype surrounding their release suggested that they would be, so Adams briefly retreated from the spotlight to regroup, heading back in 2005 with a planned triptych of new albums, the first of which is the double-album Cold Roses, recorded with his new backing band the Cardinals and released at the beginning of May. Three albums in one year is overkill even for an artist predisposed to releasing his every whim, and while it's too early at this writing to judge whether he needed to release all three of the records, it's safe to say that Cold Roses is the record many fans have been waiting to hear -- a full-fledged, unapologetic return to the country-rock that made his reputation when he led Whiskeytown. Not that the album is a retreat, or a crass attempt to give the people what they want, but it's an assured, comfortable collection of 18 songs that play to Adams' strengths because they capture him not trying quite so hard. He settles into a warm, burnished, countryish groove not far removed from vintage Harvest-era Neil Young at the beginning and keeps it going over the course of a double-disc set that isn't all that long. With the first disc clocking in at 39:39 and the second at 36:29, this could easily have been released as a single-disc set, but splitting it into two and packaging it as a mock-gatefold LP is classic Ryan Adams, highlighting both his flair for rock classicism and his tendency to come across slightly affected. As always, he's so obsessive about fitting into classic rock's long lineage that he can be slightly embarrassing -- particularly on the intro to "Beautiful Sorta," which apes David Johansen's intro to the New York Dolls' "Looking for a Kiss" in a way that guarantees a cringe -- which is also a problem when he drifts toward lazy, profanity-riddled lyrics "this sh*t just f*cks you up" on "Cherry Lane" that undercut a generally strong set of writing. But what makes Cold Roses a success, his first genuine one since Heartbreaker, is that it is a genuine band album, with the Cardinals not only getting co-writing credits but helping Adams relax and let the music flow naturally. It's not the sound of somebody striving to save rock & roll, or even to be important, but that's precisely why this is the easiest Ryan Adams to enjoy. The coming months with their coming LPs will reveal whether this is indeed a shift in his point of view, or just a brief break from his trademark blustering braggadocio.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/3/2005
  • Label: Lost Highway
  • UPC: 602498805022
  • Catalog Number: 000434302
  • Sales rank: 8,867

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Magnolia Mountain (5:52)
  2. 2 Sweet Illusions (5:02)
  3. 3 Meadowlake Street (4:28)
  4. 4 When Will You Come Back Home (4:52)
  5. 5 Beautiful Sorta (3:01)
  6. 6 Now That You're Gone (3:51)
  7. 7 Cherry Lane (4:31)
  8. 8 Mockingbird (4:47)
  9. 9 How Do You Keep Love Alive (3:12)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Easy Plateau (5:11)
  2. 2 Let It Ride (3:23)
  3. 3 Rosebud (2:55)
  4. 4 Cold Roses (4:36)
  5. 5 If I Am a Stranger (4:38)
  6. 6 Dance All Night (3:15)
  7. 7 Blossom (3:15)
  8. 8 Life Is Beautiful (4:28)
  9. 9 Friends (4:43)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Ryan Adams & the Cardinals Primary Artist
Cindy Cashdollar Steel Guitar, Vocals, Lap Steel Guitar, Guitar (Resonator)
Ryan Adams Acoustic Guitar, Harmonica, Piano, Electric Guitar, Vocals, Indexed Contributor
J.P. Bowersock Guitar, Electric Guitar
Catherine Popper Bass, Piano, Bass Guitar, Vocals
Rachael Yamagata Piano, Vocals
Brett Pemberton Drums, Vocals
Brad Pemberton Drums, Vocals
Technical Credits
Cindy Cashdollar Composer
Fred Kevorkian Mastering
Tom Schick Producer, Engineer, Audio Production
Ryan Adams Composer
J.P. Bowersock Composer
Catherine Popper Composer
Tom Gloadly Engineer
Andy West Art Direction
Brad Pemberton Composer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    ACOUSTIC/ROCK MASTERWORK

    This album is a sprawling double disc set that covers stunning acoustic and rock tracks that get better with repeated listenings. Adams is a prolific singer/songwriter who continues to be under-rated, and one of the diamonds in the rough of modern music. A great mood piece, and a great record!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Could very well be Adams' best.

    Here we have the first of Ryan Adams' three albums this year. I've been a fan of Ryan Adams since the hype surrounding "New York, New York." I've since bought Heartbreaker, Gold, Rock & Roll, and Love is Hell. The packaging was cleverly done, and the first disk's liner notes have pictures that are reminiscent of the day and daytime, while the second disk's liner notes have a nighttime feel. It's somewhat like the packaging on "Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness." I bought this album somewhat expecting him to build on the sounds of Rock & Roll and Love is Hell (two very different excellent albums apropos). What I found was a gorgeous departure from the modern rock and alt sounds he had embraced. The album's opener "Magnolia Mountain" is a very bittersweet love song, that starts out with a fairly sparse background and then builds up with wonderful guitar work by his new backing band, the Cardinals. The Cardinals are without a doubt a terrific band, i saw them live last spring with Ryan and was totally blown away. The second song, "Sweet Illusion," contains some of his most beautiful and soulful singing, the verses are about a love falling apart with the chorus building up to Ryan almost yelling a cappella the line "and I ain't got nothing but love for you now." Very excellent song. My one complaint is that there is an unnecessary section of the song "love for you, I can't use and lonely nights multiplied by the blues, that I can't resolve." It just doesn't fit and sounds like he had it in another song and tacked it on. Besides that I love the song. May I note that the chord progressions to the first two songs are almost identical, but it's part of his new sound. The third song, "Meadowlake Street," sounds like it could have gone on "Heartbreaker." It has an absolutely wonderful chorus that builds up wonderfully towards the end of the song. The rest of the first disk is great with the main highlight for me being "Beautiful Sorta." He says an intro that is both reminiscent of John Lennon in what he says and Bob Dylan in how he says it. The song is a classic rocker. Disk two begins with my least favorite song on either disk "Easy Plateau." The song's a bit repetitive and banal and he should have left it off. Mr. Adams & Co. redeem themselves with the rest of this disk, which I found to be superior to disk one. Song two- "Let It Ride" absolutely wonderful. This song has some really wonderful guitar work. You can hear the acoustic rhythm throughout and there is wonderful riffing by an electric six-string during the instrumental breaks and the lap steel slide during the verses and chorus. His new band also provides some wonderful harmonizing reminiscent of "Oh My Sweet Carolina." Lovely little ditty with clever lyrics. Song four on this disk, "Cold Roses" is amazing. The song has more wonderful guitar work and a more rock feel. During the verses Ryan sings in a somewhat gravely voice about a girl in an abusive relationship. The chorus on this song was what really got me. There is soaring, sweet, beautiful, cresendo country harmonies at the end of it. Perfect chorus in this song. The girl in the Cardinals has a truly gifted voice. Right after "Cold Roses" is the wonderful song "If I Am A Stranger" about a confusing love that sounds doubtful, yet optimistic. Wonderful song, with wonderful backing and instrumentation. Another fine example of the perfect arrangements on this album. Following "If I Am a Stranger" is "Dance All Night." This song is very upbeat with very soulful singing by Mr. Adams. Also, it has him doing what could be his finest harmonica work, i think it's him and not one of the cardinals. Check it out sometime. "Life

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A Fine Record ! ! !

    Ryan Adams delivers again with Cold Roses. Most people either love or hate Mr. Adams. If you love him, you will love this album. He is a musical chameleon. Ryan is often guilty of wearing his influences on his sleeve. Here lies a Grateful Dead soaked double disk that gives homage to the Dead without sounding like a cheesy copycat like Phish or Moe. The highlight for me, as a long time Dead Head (46 shows from 89 to 94), is the track Rosebud. Here Adams uses his “I'm so sad, why did you leave me” formula to lament Garcia's guitar. It’s really quite touching. There is nothing jammy about this disk, and Adams doesn’t waste your time with endless pointless noodleing, however if you like the Dead’s song shapes, this may very well become you favorite Ryan Adams CD.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews