Cold Steel: The Art of Fencing with the Sabre

( 2 )

Overview


A pioneer of modern fencing, Alfred Hutton was the first president of the Amateur Fencing Association and a father of modern research into the Western combat arts. In addition to his lectures about ancient weapons and his demonstrations of their use, Hutton created this 1889 classic, a continuing source of instruction and enlightenment to modern readers.
The techniques associated with the sabre differ markedly from those of the épeé and the rapier. This study offers both ...
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Cold Steel: The Art of Fencing with the Sabre

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Overview


A pioneer of modern fencing, Alfred Hutton was the first president of the Amateur Fencing Association and a father of modern research into the Western combat arts. In addition to his lectures about ancient weapons and his demonstrations of their use, Hutton created this 1889 classic, a continuing source of instruction and enlightenment to modern readers.
The techniques associated with the sabre differ markedly from those of the épeé and the rapier. This study offers both technical and historical views of the art of the sabre. It begins with a look at the weapon's construction and its grip, followed by explanations of a variety of different strokes and parries as well as methods of combining attack and defense. Additional topics include approaches suitable for left-handed fencers, ceremonial aspects of the art, and contrasts between the sabre, the bayonet, and the French sword. Descriptions of associated weapons cover the great stick and the constable's truncheon, and the book concludes with considerations of the short sword-bayonet, or dagger. Fifty-five illustrations demonstrate how to hold the sabre, how to parry and guard, seizure, and numerous other aspects of the art of fencing with a sabre.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

The Sabre
  Introduction
  The Parts of the Sabre
  How to Hold the Sabre
  Guard
  The Guards
  The Moulinet
  The Cuts
  The Point
  The Pummel
  The "Parade," or Parry
  The Return, or "Riposte"
  Simple Attacks and Parries, with one Riposte
  Distance
  To Advance
  To Gain Ground on the Lunge
  To Retire
  The Traverse
  The Pass
  Commanding
  Timing
  Slipping
  Counter-time
  Disengaging
  Beating
  Redoubling
  The Stop-thrust
  The Under Stop-thrust
  Feints
  Lesson for Receipt of a Feint
  Double Feints
  Lesson for Returns preceded by Feints
  The Sword Arm
  Combinations of Ripostes
  Left-handed Swordsmen
  Left-handed Swordsmen, Lessons for
  Left-handed Swordsmen, Feints for
  Left-handed Swordsmen, Returns for
  Combinations of Ripostes for Left Hand against Right
  The Salute
  The Assault
  To Acknowledge a Hit
  Equipment
The Game of the Sword
  The Guard
  The Attack
  The Parries
Sabre Against Bayonet
The Sabre Opposed to the French Sword
The Great Stick
  Guard (Quarte)
  False-guard (Tierce)
  The Moulinets
  The Cuts
  The Parries
  Lessons with one Riposte
  Combinations
The Constable's Truncheon
The Short Sword-Beyonet, or Dagger
  Lessons
  Throwing the Dagger
  The Seizure in Dagger Play
Rules
  Judges
Appendix
  The Blindfold Lessons on Defence with Foil or Sword
Index
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Customer Reviews

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  • Posted April 14, 2013

    "Cold Steel" is an excellent book that I quite enjoyed

    "Cold Steel" is an excellent book that I quite enjoyed. It is useful for practice in historical fencing. As another reviewer has mentioned, sport fencing has evolved quite a bit, away from its martial roots and some of the parries (e.g. Prime and Seconde) are no longer used by sport fencing. But those are alive and well in historical fencing as are the cuts they are intended to block.

    I have the Nook eBook version and it works well - the format and images are both maintained well.

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  • Posted July 5, 2012

    Great for Fencers Interested in History

    <i>Cold Steel</i> is a book that aims to introduce basic fencer into a wider world. Written in 1889, it explains how to become a better sabre fencer for a world where the possibility of a duel or the use of a sabre in military fighting still existed. That is only half the fun, because the book goes beyond sabre fencing to cover fighting with sticks, daggers, and even unarmed defenses against a dagger.

    In terms of useful technique, <i>Cold Steel</i> would be frowned upon by many modern sport fencing coaches. That shouldn't stop modern sport fencers from reading the book for three reasons. One, the book may spark an idea for a drill or training that could be relevant. Two, it is fun to see how the sport evolved and connect your fencing to that of people who came before you. Three, sometimes it is fun to do something extra-curricular to pure sport fencing.

    Hutton writes for readers who already have a basic knowledge of fencing and likely will take a sabre in hand primarily for sport fencing. Nevertheless, he believes that there are other things worth knowing beyond just fencing in a salle or gymnasium. He writes brief chapters on fencing with a sabre against a bayonet and a short sword and talks about how to fight with a large stick, a constable's truncheon or billy club, and how to fight with daggers and disarm someone if you are unarmed. It is a rather complete collection of fighting skills.

    A couple of notes of caution are in order. First is that practicing any kind of contact skill, whether it be sports, martial arts, or anything else requires the proper equipment, training, and mindset to be done safely. Hutton himself goes into the equipment necessary. Modern equipment has given us more options, and it should be used.

    Second, Hutton's terminology is antiquated and some is even terms he has self-defined. So, if you do try to practice any of this, read everything carefully and do not assume that modern terminology applies.

    I would recommend this book to people with an interest in fencing, martial arts, and the history of those subjects.

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