Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy [New in Paper]

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Overview

"Meticulously researched and beautifully written, Mary Dudziak's book makes a spectacularly illuminating contribution to a subject traditionally neglected—the linkage between race relations and foreign policy: neither African-American history nor diplomatic history will be the same again."—Gerald Horne, author of Race Woman: The Lives of Shirley Graham Du Bois

"Reinhold Niebuhr once commented that blacks cannot count on the altruism of whites for improvements in blacks' condition. Readers who think Niebuhr's remark was unfair to whites need to read this book. Mary Dudziak documents, in impressive detail, how the self-interest of elite whites instigated, shaped, and limited civil rights gains for blacks during the Cold War years. Raises serious questions about the future of racial justice in America."—Richard Delgado, Jean Lindsley Professor of Law, University of Colorado

"This book is a tour de force. Dudziak's brilliant analysis shows that the Cold War had a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Hers is the first book to make this important connection. It is a major contribution to our understanding of both the Civil Rights movement and the Cold War itself. . . . Because it is beautifully written in clear, lively prose, and draws its analysis from dramatic events and compelling stories of people involved from the top level of government to the grass roots, it will be an outstanding book for both students and the general public. I recommend it with no hesitation and with great enthusiasm."—Elaine Tyler May, author of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era

"This book reflects a growing interest among historians in the global significance of race. . . . It is accessible and will have multiple uses as an approach to civil rights history, as an examination of policy making, and as a model of how a study can be attentive to both foreign and domestic aspects of a particular issue. It is tightly argued, coherent, and polished, and it features some particularly fine writing."—Brenda Plummer, author of Rising Wind: Black Americans and U.S. Foreign Affairs, 1935-1960

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Editorial Reviews

American Lawyer
Groundbreaking.
Reviews in American History
[An] important book
— H. W. Brands
Times Higher Education Supplement
A meticulously researched and eloquently composed study.
— Desmond King
Journal of Cold War Studies
In her long-awaited book, Mary Dudziak brilliantly demonstrates the interconnections between race relations and the American response to the early Cold War. . . . Dudziak sets a new standard for literature on race and Cold War foreign policy. . . . Her work deserves a wide audience.
— Laura Belmonte
Human Rights Quarterly
Dudziak marvelously frames her discussion of the US civil rights movement in the international and Cold War context in such a way that raises, discusses, and illuminates larger issues that help us to understand how the struggle for human rights proceeds.
— Carlo Krieger
H-Net Reviews
Mary Dudziak's sophisticated account of race, reform, and international relations in post-World War II America is an outstanding work that should help historians rethink the early Cold War era.
— David Farber, H-Pol
Harvard Law Review
This nuanced, scholarly appraisal of the relationship between foreign policy and the civil rights story offers a fresh and provocative perspective on twentieth-century American history.
The Washington Times
Mary L. Dudziak . . . astutely explores the intimate relationship between the policy of communist containment and the civil rights movement. . . . Her book thoughtfully and thoroughly documents how ridiculous and hypocritical we appeared to the post-colonial, newly emerging nations of Africa and Asia by championing the ideals of freedom, democracy and economic equity around the world while at the same time shamelessly denying access to those very same principles to millions of Americans at home.
— Edward C. Smith
Choice
Dudziak earns high praise for her superb work.
Law and History Review
Cold War Civil Rights challenges readers to think globally and locally about the relation between the Cold War and civil rights. It also provides food for thought on the post-Cold War era.
— Laurie B. Green
Ethnic & Racial Studies
Dudziak has marshalled an impressive array of primary source material to substantiate her case, but is is never allowed to hinder the unfolding narrative of the civil rights movement in general or her thesis in particular. . . . [An] excellent study.
— George Lewis
American Historical Review
An intelligent and informative book that is sure to become a staple of both civil rights and Cold War historiography.
— Steven F. Lawson
American Quarterly
Dudziak's argument is clearly written, prodigiously researched, and profoundly important. . . . Cold War Civil Rights . . . is the most comprehensively researched study of the connection between foreign and domestic racial politics in the post-World War II era. Dudziak's book will inspire a reconsideration of postwar civil rights history.
— Alex Lubin
Reviews in American History - H.W. Brands
[An] important book
Times Higher Education Supplement - Desmond King
A meticulously researched and eloquently composed study.
Journal of Cold War Studies - Laura Belmonte
In her long-awaited book, Mary Dudziak brilliantly demonstrates the interconnections between race relations and the American response to the early Cold War. . . . Dudziak sets a new standard for literature on race and Cold War foreign policy. . . . Her work deserves a wide audience.
Human Rights Quarterly - Paul Gordon Lauren
Civil rights activists' efforts were watched carefully by the nation and by the world, and now are described and analyzed for us all with masterful skill by Mary Dudziak in Cold War Civil Rights. Although the Cold War is over, race remains a critical feature of global politics. As recent events remind us so well, much appears to be tied loosely with the destiny of democracy in the United States and the way that the country is seen by a diverse and divided world. In understanding this process, the issues at stake, the roles that individuals play, and the implications for human rights, Cold War Civil Rights will provide enormous assistance.
H-Net Reviews - David Farber
Mary Dudziak's sophisticated account of race, reform, and international relations in post-World War II America is an outstanding work that should help historians rethink the early Cold War era.
The Washington Times - Edward C. Smith
Mary L. Dudziak . . . astutely explores the intimate relationship between the policy of communist containment and the civil rights movement. . . . Her book thoughtfully and thoroughly documents how ridiculous and hypocritical we appeared to the post-colonial, newly emerging nations of Africa and Asia by championing the ideals of freedom, democracy and economic equity around the world while at the same time shamelessly denying access to those very same principles to millions of Americans at home.
Law and History Review - Laurie B. Green
Cold War Civil Rights challenges readers to think globally and locally about the relation between the Cold War and civil rights. It also provides food for thought on the post-Cold War era.
Ethnic & Racial Studies - George Lewis
Dudziak has marshalled an impressive array of primary source material to substantiate her case, but is is never allowed to hinder the unfolding narrative of the civil rights movement in general or her thesis in particular. . . . [An] excellent study.
American Historical Review - Steven F. Lawson
An intelligent and informative book that is sure to become a staple of both civil rights and Cold War historiography.
Human Rights Quarterly - Carlo Krieger
Dudziak marvelously frames her discussion of the US civil rights movement in the international and Cold War context in such a way that raises, discusses, and illuminates larger issues that help us to understand how the struggle for human rights proceeds.
American Quarterly - Alex Lubin
Dudziak's argument is clearly written, prodigiously researched, and profoundly important. . . . Cold War Civil Rights . . . is the most comprehensively researched study of the connection between foreign and domestic racial politics in the post-World War II era. Dudziak's book will inspire a reconsideration of postwar civil rights history.
Reviews in American History - H. W. Brands
[An] important book
From the Publisher
"Dudziak earns high praise for her superb work."—
Choice

"Cold War Civil Rights challenges readers to think globally and locally about the relation between the Cold War and civil rights. It also provides food for thought on the post-Cold War era."—Laurie B. Green, Law and History Review

"Dudziak has marshalled an impressive array of primary source material to substantiate her case, but is is never allowed to hinder the unfolding narrative of the civil rights movement in general or her thesis in particular. . . . [An] excellent study."—George Lewis, Ethnic & Racial Studies

"An intelligent and informative book that is sure to become a staple of both civil rights and Cold War historiography."—Steven F. Lawson, American Historical Review

"Dudziak marvelously frames her discussion of the US civil rights movement in the international and Cold War context in such a way that raises, discusses, and illuminates larger issues that help us to understand how the struggle for human rights proceeds."—Carlo Krieger, Human Rights Quarterly

"Dudziak's argument is clearly written, prodigiously researched, and profoundly important. . . . Cold War Civil Rights . . . is the most comprehensively researched study of the connection between foreign and domestic racial politics in the post-World War II era. Dudziak's book will inspire a reconsideration of postwar civil rights history."—Alex Lubin, American Quarterly

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Mary L. Dudziak is professor of law, history, and political science at the University of Southern California. Her books include "Exporting American Dreams: Thurgood Marshall's African Journey", "September 11 in History", and "Legal Borderlands".

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations xiii
Preface to the 2011 Edition xv
INTRODUCTION 3
CHAPTER 1: Coming to Terms with Cold War Civil Rights 18
CHAPTER 2: Telling Stories about Race and Democracy 47
CHAPTER 3: Fighting the Cold War with Civil Rights Reform 79
CHAPTER 4: Holding the Line in Little Rock 115
CHAPTER 5: Losing Control in Camelot 152
CHAPTER 6: Shifting the Focus of America’s Image Abroad 203
CONCLUSION 249
Notes 255
Acknowledgments 311
Index 317

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