The Cold Water Witch

The Cold Water Witch

by Yannick D Murphy, Tom Lintern
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

It's the coldest night of the year and an eerie figure floats into a young girl's house. It is the Cold Water Witch and she's searching for someone to take her place as the ruler of a lonely, distant, frozen land. But the Cold Water Witch isn't prepared for the spunky child who awaits her. In the rewarding tradition of the classic fairy tale, this battle of wits

Overview

It's the coldest night of the year and an eerie figure floats into a young girl's house. It is the Cold Water Witch and she's searching for someone to take her place as the ruler of a lonely, distant, frozen land. But the Cold Water Witch isn't prepared for the spunky child who awaits her. In the rewarding tradition of the classic fairy tale, this battle of wits between a young girl and a witch takes an unexpected turn, and readers discover that the magic of friendship is the greatest magic of all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This would be an unsettling story if Murphy's (Baby Polar) heroine, a plucky girl in a polka-dot nightgown, weren't so comically sure of defeating the icy-fingered Cold Water Witch. Hovering over the girl's bed and dressed in a splendid white gown, the witch extends her bony fingers and says, "Come with me to where the waters run cold. Come with me to where the world is covered in snow." But the girl isn't having any of it: "You'll have to drag me," she replies. In a clever twist on Gretel's oven gambit, the girl tricks the witch into entering the icebox without her ("I smell coconut. I hear waves. Are you sure you're sending me to the frozen land?" she asks innocently), then discovers that the witch is actually a girl under a spell. Lintern's (The Tooth Fairy Meets El Ratón Perez) spreads glow with cold light, like computer screens; their flat, cartoon feel is well suited to Murphy's eerie premise, though the pastel palette keeps things from getting too dark. It's a crooked, tense tale, but a satisfying battle of wits. Ages 4-7. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
Review, Publishers Weekly, July 2, 2010:
"It's a crooked, tense tale, but a satisfying battle of wits."

Review, Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2010:
"Initially reminiscent of Andersen’s frigid Snow Queen, this Cold Water Witch melts with kindness."

Review, Carolina Parent, October 26, 2010:
"...readers discover the magic of friendship in this imaginative tale."

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
On the coldest of nights with icicles for fingers and snow in her hair, the Cold Water Witch comes for the little girl. Luring her from her bed with promises of skating on the pond and playing in the snow, the clever girl realizes that the witch intends to carry her off to a frozen land. Just as the witch is about to send the girl into the freezer (the portal for the journey) the girl, in a page right out of Hansel and Gretel, pushes the Cold Water Witch deep inside. The witch's tears that bounce like diamonds on the floor touch the young girl's heart and when she learns that the witch is young girl under a spell she takes her icy hand in hers, the snow melts and the two girls head back to a warm bedroom to snuggle under the blankets and drink warm tea. Employing motifs from fairy tales the author seeks to create a modern-day tale of an evil enchantment undone by kindness. For the most part it works with its sinister witch and spunky heroine. It is the ending that falls flat. It is the illustrations, rendered in pencil and edited with photo editing software that are exceptional and save the day. Cold tones of ice blue, pale mauve, and frigid white create a chilly atmosphere with only the little girl's pink nightgown added for warmth. When the Cold Water Witch melts, the colors heat up with shades of red and orange. It is a suitable cold-weather read for primary age children. Better yet, read it on a hot summer day to cool off. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—Murphy's icy witch is introduced in spare terms and is dimly perceived at first outside a large house in the dark blue night. Much of the story is dialogue between the white, glamorous figure and the girl she has come to lure to her icy world. Once awakened by the witch, the little girl shows no fear and begins to argue with the intruder, outsmarting the witch by luring her into the freezer. Not really scary, the witch is also none too bright. The child learns the story of the icy maiden's own enchantment and warms her frozen adult figure into the child she once was. "Together they skipped back to the girl's bedroom…and laughed under an imaginary summer sun." The author draws loosely on folktale motifs in creating this simple story and opts for a cozy tone and culmination. The text is illustrated with flat, pretty Photoshop figures found in many an animated film. This is a reassuring if anticlimactic tale of a figure lurking in the night, and some adults especially will like the confident, sensible protagonist.—Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582463308
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
08/10/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

She came out on the coldest night.
Her fingers were icicles.
She had snow for her hair.
She was looking for a girl.

"Woooooooo!" she called.
"Little girl, wake up.
Come with me to where the waters run cold.
Come with me to where the world is covered in snow."

"It's the middle of the night. I'm not going anywhere!" the little girl said.

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
Review, Publishers Weekly, July 2, 2010:
"It's a crooked, tense tale, but a satisfying battle of wits."

Review, Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2010:
"Initially reminiscent of Andersen’s frigid Snow Queen, this Cold Water Witch melts with kindness."

Review, Carolina Parent, October 26, 2010:
"...readers discover the magic of friendship in this imaginative tale."

Meet the Author

YANNICK MURPHY was raised in Manhattan, attended Hampshire College, and then New York University for graduate school. She currently teaches library and technology at a small elementary school and writes a monthly children's book review for her local paper. This is her third picture book. Yannick lives in Reading, Vermont.
 
TOM LINTERN is a designer, illustrator, and storyboard artist. This is his second picture book. He previously illustrated The Tooth Fairy Meets El Ratón Pérez for Tricycle Press. Tom lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >