Collaborating to Meet Standards: Teacher/Librarian Partnerships for K-2

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Overview

These standards-based, easy-to-follow collaborative lessons will not only build a strong bridge between the school library and the classroom, but will help educators help students improve their skills and scores. Written for elementary school library media specialists and their K-2 teaching partners, this book coaches readers on methods to meet student literacy standards. In this balanced literacy age, collaboration is a perfect means to address national, state, and local literacy standards.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"This subtitle is a more accurate description of the information within. The book opens with a refreshing reality check: No Child Left Behind purports to focus on reading, but envisions reading as little more than decoding and comprehending text. What library professionals consider real reading–reading for meaning, reading as a life skill, reading as an integral piece of the more inclusive concept of information literacy–is sacrificed, as are many libraries and librarians, for this limited and limiting goal. After acknowledging the constraints now imposed upon library media specialists, Buzzeo makes lemonade by taking these limitations and refocusing what librarians do at the primary level through a different lens: becoming literacy cheerleaders and cultivating collaboration with teachers. The author proposes specific strategies for collaboration to overcome imposed roadblocks and presents a template for unit and lesson development that addresses national standards and satisfies NCLB requirements while still dealing constructively with the nine information literacy standards developed by AASL. The 15 units, complete with black-line masters and written by several different library media professionals, make up most of the book and can help struggling school librarians in their attempts to integrate their philosophy with the difficult currency of present reality."

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School Library Journal

"Collaborating to Meet Literacy Standards is an essential book that models cooperative relationships between library media specialists and teachers in establishing and reaching classroom literacy goals. The specific age group targeted in this volume is K-2; however, the philosophical principles articulated in the introductory chapters extend way beyond particular grade parameters. Toni Buzzeo carefully addresses literacy legislation in today's elementary school curriculum, gives an overview of collaboration efforts between librarians and teachers during the past ten years and suggests successful practices in introducing literacy programs in the classroom. Collaboration is key in any classroom literacy program and the cooperation of administrators, parents, students and school staff is essential. The majority of Collaborating to Meet Literacy Standards consists of fifteen sample literacy-based units actually implemented by teachers and librarians. The creative units can be easily incorporated as written or adapted to fit most literacy programs. The text is praiseworthy for its theoretical context and practical application. Collaborating to Meet Literacy Standards is essential for schools implementing a collaborative literacy-based program."

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Catholic Library World

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This instructional book is a result of a 1998 mandate by the American Association of School Librarians that the role of librarian become more of a collaborative one in achieving higher standards of literacy in schools. In other words, librarians should be considered part of the team to improve reading and writing skills and ultimately scores on standardized tests. Based on the "Four Blocks Literacy Model" of guided reading, self selected reading, writing, and work with words, this book is a guide for schools to work toward a collaborative model. The five chapters define literacy, set the stage for collaboration among teachers, staff and librarians, help participants overcome traditional roadblocks, provide a template for achieving success, and provide fifteen curriculum units to get the program going. The units contain everything needed including a letter to parents, and a rubric for assessment. Plenty of masters for KWL charts, word lists, standards, and useful forms are also included. The book explains everything in an organized, accessible manner. The only thing missing is a self-assessment for participants to periodically check their attitudes and efforts as they progress in their collaborative roles.
School Library Journal

This book's subtitle is a more accurate description of the information within. The book opens with a refreshing reality check: No Child Left Behind purports to focus on reading, but envisions reading as little more than decoding and comprehending text. What library professionals consider realreading-reading for meaning, reading as a life skill, reading as an integral piece of the more inclusive concept of information literacy-is sacrificed, as are many libraries and librarians, for this limited and limiting goal. After acknowledging the constraints now imposed upon library media specialists, Buzzeo makes lemonade by taking these limitations and refocusing what librarians do at the primary level through a different lens: becoming literacy cheerleaders and cultivating collaboration with teachers. The author proposes specific strategies for collaboration to overcome imposed roadblocks and presents a template for unit and lesson development that addresses national standards and satisfies NCLB requirements while still dealing constructively with the nine information literacy standards developed by AASL. The 15 units, complete with black-line masters and written by several different library media professionals, make up most of the book and can help struggling school librarians in their attempts to integrate their philosophy with the difficult currency of present reality.-Mary R. Hofmann, Rivera Middle School, Merced, CA

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781586831899
  • Publisher: Linworth Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2007
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 296
  • Product dimensions: 8.62 (w) x 11.02 (h) x 0.61 (d)

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