The Collected Dialogues of Plato / Edition 1

The Collected Dialogues of Plato / Edition 1

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by Plato
     
 

ISBN-10: 0691097186

ISBN-13: 9780691097183

Pub. Date: 10/01/1961

Publisher: Princeton University Press

All the writings of Plato generally considered to be authentic are here presented in the only complete one-volume Plato available in English. The editors set out to choose the contents of this collected edition from the work of the best British and American translators of the last 100 years, ranging from Jowett (1871) to scholars of the present day. The volume

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Overview

All the writings of Plato generally considered to be authentic are here presented in the only complete one-volume Plato available in English. The editors set out to choose the contents of this collected edition from the work of the best British and American translators of the last 100 years, ranging from Jowett (1871) to scholars of the present day. The volume contains prefatory notes to each dialogue, by Edith Hamilton; an introductory essay on Plato's philosophy and writings, by Huntington Cairns; and a comprehensive index which seeks, by means of cross references, to assist the reader with the philosophical vocabulary of the different translators.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691097183
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
10/01/1961
Series:
Bollingen Series (General) Series, #71
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
1776
Sales rank:
296,689
Product dimensions:
6.46(w) x 9.04(h) x 2.24(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

EDITORIAL NOTE, xi,
INTRODUCTION, by Huntington Cairns, xiii,
SOCRATES' DEFENSE (APOLOGY), 3,
CRITO, 27,
PHAEDO, 40,
CHARMIDES, 99,
LACHES, 123,
LYSIS, 145,
EUTHYPHRO, 169,
MENEXENUS, 186,
LESSER HIPPIAS, 200,
ION, 215,
GORGIAS, 229,
PROTAGORAS, 308,
MENO, 353,
EUTHYDEMUS, 385,
CRATYLUS, 421,
PHAEDRUS, 475,
SYMPOSIUM, 526,
REPUBLIC, 575,
THEAETETUS, 845,
PARMENIDES, 920,
SOPHIST, 957,
STATESMAN, 1018,
PHILEBUS, 1086,
TIMAEUS, 1151,
CRITIAS, 1212,
LAWS, 1225,
APPENDIX,
EPINOMIS, 1517,
GREATER HIPPIAS, 1534,
LETTERS, 1560,
INDEX, 1607,

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As if after reading Plotinus, Augustine and all those Arabian philosophers with those names one can never recall, we needed another commentary on the works of Plato. Cela va de soi (it goes without saying), Plato has been remembered for a reason. Although, there are some philosophers who would consider Plato a mistake (Quine for example, if I remember rightly, refused to teach a class on Plato), I think it would be absurd not to consider Plato at all. There are some dialouges in this book (such as the Timaeus) that will make you yawn, others, like Gorgias, the Symposium and the Laws will make you wide-awake in wonder. But most importantly, these dialouges will introduce you to Socrates. Although, there is no way to ascertain whether it was Plato or Socrates speaking in these dialouges, most assume that in The Apology, The Crito and a few of Plato's other early dialouges, one gets a glimpse of the real Socrates. Socrates, in Plato's (and also Xenophanes) dialouges is a good man, one who will inspire you. He'll teach you the advantages of being open-minded, of realizing human ignorance, and above all, self-knowledge ('know thyself', 'the unexamined life is a life not worth living'). Which, in my opinion, makes Plato worth reading. I would encourage you to read these dialouges and take what you can, and then go on to Aristotle.
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