Collected Lyrics

Collected Lyrics

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by Edna St. Vincent Millay
     
 

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These unique and beautiful lyrics — over two hundred of them — were selected by Edna St. Vincent Millay herself and represent the major portion of her lifework.

Their musical perfection, emotional power, and superb, delicate workmanship have made Edna St. Vincent Millay one of America's great poets.  See more details below

Overview

These unique and beautiful lyrics — over two hundred of them — were selected by Edna St. Vincent Millay herself and represent the major portion of her lifework.

Their musical perfection, emotional power, and superb, delicate workmanship have made Edna St. Vincent Millay one of America's great poets.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060908638
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/01/1981
Series:
Harper Perennial
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.69(d)

What People are saying about this

E. Nelson Hayes
"Hers was the purest lyric voice heard in America in the first half of the twentieth century."

Meet the Author

Edna St. Vincent Millay was born in 1892 in Rockland, Maine, the eldest of three daughters, and was encouraged by her mother to develop her talents for music and poetry. Her long poem "Renascence" won critical attention in an anthology contest in 1912 and secured for her a patron who enabled her to go to Vassar College.

After graduating in 1917 she lived in Greenwich Village in New York for a few years, acting, writing satirical pieces for journals (usually under a pseudonym), and continuing to work at her poetry. She traveled in Europe throughout 1921-22 as a "foreign correspondent" for Vanity Fair. Her collection A Few Figs from Thistles (1920) gained her a reputation for hedonistic wit and cynicism, but her other collections (including the earlier Renascence and Other Poems [1917]) are without exception more seriously passionate or reflective.

In 1923 she married Eugene Boissevain and — after further travel — embarked on a series of reading tours which helped to consolidate her nationwide renown. From 1925 onwards she lived at Steepletop, a farmstead in Austerlitz, New York, where her husband protected her from all responsibilities except her creative work. Often involved in feminist or political causes (including the Sacco-Vanzetti case of 1927), she turned to writing anti-fascist propaganda poetry in 1940 and further damaged a reputation already in decline. In her last years of her life she became more withdrawn and isolated, and her health, which had never been robust, became increasingly poor.

She died in 1950.

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