Collected Papers of Martin Kay: A Half Century of Computational Linguistics

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Overview

Since the dawn of the age of computers, researchers have been pushing the limits of available processing power to tackle the formidable challenge of developing software that can understand ordinary human language.  At the forefront of this quest for the past fifty years, Martin Kay has been a constant source of new algorithms which have proven fundamental to progress in computational linguistics. Collected Papers of Martin Kay, the first comprehensive collection of his works to date, opens a window into the growth of an increasingly important field of scientific research and development. 

 

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781575865713
  • Publisher: Center for the Study of Language and Inf
  • Publication date: 3/15/2010
  • Pages: 639
  • Product dimensions: 7.32 (w) x 10.51 (h) x 1.69 (d)

Meet the Author

Dan Flickinger is project manager of the Linguistic Grammars Online Project at the Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.
Stephan Oepen is professor in computational linguistics at the University of Oslo and senior researcher at the Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.

 

 

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Table of Contents

Foreword

Acknowledgements

1 Introduction 1

2 A Parsing Procedure 19

3 Rules of Interpretation 22

3.1 Traditional Grammar and Descriptive Linguistics 22

3.2 Rules of Formation 23

3.3 Rules of Interpretation 24

3.4 A Model for Qualification 25

3.5 Computation Methods 26

3.6 Machine Translation 27

4 The Logic of Cognate Recognition in Historical Linguistics 31

4.1 Correspondences and Decompositions 33

4.2 Representation by Truth Functions 35

4.3 The Theory and the Practice 37

4.4 Implementing the Theory 38

5 Natural Language in Computer Form Theodore Ziehe Ziehe, Theodore 40

5.1 Codes 44

5.2 Organized Files of Texts 52

5.3 Writing Text Catalogs 60

5.4 Printing 70

6 The Tabular Parser 76

6.1 Dependency Phrase Grammar 76

6.2 Rule Tables 79

6.3 Functions and Dependency Phrase Rule Tables 86

6.4 The Punched Card Format 88

6.5 The Computer Program 90

6.6 Input and Output 93

7 Experiments with a Powerful Parser 98

7.1 The Form of Rules 99

7.2 Phrase-Structure Grammar 103

7.3 Transformational Grammar 105

8 From Semantics to Syntax 112

9 Computational Linguistics at RAND - 1967 124

10 A Computer System to Aid the Linguistic Field Worker 134

11 Computational Competence and Linguistic Performance 141

12 Performance Grammars 149

13 The MIND Translation System: A Study in Man-Machine Collaboration R. Bisbey Bisbey, R. 156

13.1 What is a Translation Machine? 156

13.2 Why is Translation Difficult? 157

13.3 Conventional Machine Translation 159

13.4 Human-Aided Translation 162

13.5 An Experimental Translator 164

13.6 Extensions to Human-Aided Translation 164

13.7 The Future of the System 166

14 The MIND System 169

14.1 Motivation 169

14.2 The Overall Structure of the System 171

14.3 Syntactic Analysis and the Chart 172

14.4 The Disambiguator 181

14.5 Semantics 183

14.6 The Output Component 188

14.7 Summary 189

15 Automatic Translation of Natural Languages 191

16 Morphological Analysis 202

17 Syntactic Processing and Functional Sentence Perspective 216

17.1 Reversible Grammars 216

17.2 The Processor 217

17.3 The Use of Registers 219

17.4 Functional Sentence Perspective 220

18 Overview of Computer Aids in Translation 223

19 The Proper Place of Men and Machines in Language Translation 229

19.1 The Prima Facie Case Against Machine Translation 231

19.2 Machine Translation and Linguistics 231

19.3 Machine Translation and Computer Science 233

19.4 The Statistical Defense 235

19.5 The Sorcerer's Apprentice Defense 236

19.6 The Translator's Amanuensis 238

19.7 Machine Translation 244

20 Functional Grammar 247

21 Algorithm Schemata and Data Structures in Syntactic Processing 265

21.1 Configuration Tables and Algorithm Schemata 268

21.2 The Chart 282

21.3 The Agenda 293

22 When Meta-Rules are not Meta-Rules 297

22.1 A Straw Man 299

22.2 Phonological and Graphological Rules 302

22.3 Context-Free Rules as Transition Networks 306

22.4 Meta-Rules as Transducers 307

22.5 Constructing Meta-Rule Transducers 311

22.6 Composing Transducers 313

23 Functional Unification Grammar: A Formalism for Machine Translation 318

23.1 Overview 318

23.2 The Formalism 320

23.3 Translation 324

24 Parsing in Functional Unification Grammar 328

24.1 Functional Unification Grammar 329

24.2 Compilation 330

24.3 The Parser 340

24.4 The Compiler 346

25 Parsing in a Free Word Order Language Lauri Karttunen Karttunen, Lauri 350

25.1 Data 352

25.2 A unification grammar for Finnish 360

25.3 Parser 367

26 Structure Sharing with Binary Trees Lauri Karttunen Karttunen, Lauri 373

27 Unification in Grammar 381

27.1 Simple Unification Grammar 382

27.2 Semantics 386

27.3 Control structure 388

28 Machine Translation will not Work 390

29 The Linguistic Connection 392

30 Nonconcatenative Finite-State Morphology 398

31 Head-Driven Parsing 409

32 Machines and People in Translation 418

33 Semantic Abstraction and Anaphora Mark Johnson Johnson, Mark 420

33.1 A Grammar using Semantic Constructors 422

33.2 The Predicate-Logic Constructors 425

33.3 The Sets-of-Infons Constructors 426

33.4 The Discourse-Representation Constructors 428

33.5 Extending the Grammar to Handle Quantifier-Raising 429

34 Computational Linguistics 433

35 Ongoing Directions in Computational Linguistics 443

36 Unification 445

36.1 Productivity 445

36.2 Phrase structure 447

36.3 Multiple structures 449

36.4 Descriptions 451

36.5 Grammar rules 453

36.6 Augmented Transition Networks 455

36.7 Logical variables 458

36.8 Clausal form and term unification 459

36.9 Path equations 463

36.10 Long-distance dependency 463

37 Foreword to "An Introduction to Machine Translation" 466

38 Text-Translation Alignment Martin Roscheisen Roscheisen, Martin 469

38.1 The Problem 469

38.2 The Alignment Algorithm 471

38.3 Morphology 475

38.4 Experimental Results 477

38.5 Related Work 486

38.6 Future Work 487

39 Regular Models of Phonological Rule Systems Ronald M. Kaplan Kaplan, Ronald M. 489

39.1 Introduction 489

39.2 Rewriting Rules and Transducers 491

39.3 Mathematical Concepts and Tools 495

39.4 Rewriting Rule Formalisms 503

39.5 Rewriting Rules as Regular Relations 508

39.6 Grammars of Rewriting Rules 520

39.7 Two-Level Rule Systems 523

40 Parsing and Empty Nodes Mark Johnson Johnson, Mark 533

40.1 The Problem with Empty Nodes 533

40.2 Sponsoring 535

40.3 Linguistic Aspects of Sponsoring 536

40.4 Implementation 540

41 Machine Translation: The Disappointing Past and Present 543

42 Chart Generation 546

42.1 Charts 546

42.2 Generation 547

42.3 The Algorithm Schema 548

42.4 Internal and External Indices 549

42.5 Indexing 550

43 It's Still the Proper Place 552

44 Chart Translation 555

44.1 Translation and Knowledge 555

44.2 History 556

44.3 The Translation Relation 557

44.4 Charts and Contexted Sets 558

44.5 Choosing the Best Translation 561

45 David G. Hays 563

46 Preface to "Parallel Text Processing" 568

47 Guides and Oracles for Linear-Time Parsing 572

48 Introduction to Handbook of Computational Linguistics 577

49 Substring Alignment Using Suffix Trees 580

50 Translation, Meaning and Reference 587

51 Antonio Zampolli 597

52 A Life of Language 600

Cumulative References 613

Complete List of Publications to Date 623

Name Index 629

Subject Index 633

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