Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume X: Uncollected Prose Writings

Overview

With the appearance of the tenth and final volume of Collected Works, a project fifty years in the making reaches completion: the publication of critically edited texts of all of Emerson’s works published in his lifetime and under his supervision. The Uncollected Prose Writings is the definitive gathering of Emerson’s previously published prose writings that he left uncollected at the time of his death.

The Uncollected Prose Writings supersedes the three posthumous volumes of ...

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Overview

With the appearance of the tenth and final volume of Collected Works, a project fifty years in the making reaches completion: the publication of critically edited texts of all of Emerson’s works published in his lifetime and under his supervision. The Uncollected Prose Writings is the definitive gathering of Emerson’s previously published prose writings that he left uncollected at the time of his death.

The Uncollected Prose Writings supersedes the three posthumous volumes of Emerson’s prose that James Elliot Cabot and Edward Waldo Emerson added to his canon. Seeing as their primary task the expansion of the Emerson canon, they embellished and improvised. By contrast, Ronald A. Bosco and Joel Myerson have undertaken the restoration of Emerson’s uncollected prose canon, printing only what Emerson alone wrote, authorized for publication, and saw into print.

In their Historical Introduction and Textual Introduction, the editors survey the sweep of Emerson’s uncollected published prose. The evidence they marshal reveals Emerson’s progressive reliance on lectures as forerunners to his published prose in major periodicals and clarifies what has been a slowly emerging portrait of the last decade and a half of his life as a public intellectual.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674049581
  • Publisher: Harvard
  • Publication date: 1/8/2013
  • Pages: 1104
  • Sales rank: 1,476,258
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 6.60 (h) x 2.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Ronald A. Bosco, Distinguished Professor of English and American Literature, State University of New York at Albany, is General Editor of the Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Joel Myerson, Carolina Distinguished Professor of American Literature Emeritus at the University of South Carolina, is Textual Editor of the Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Glen M. Johnson is Professor of English, The Catholic University of America.

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Table of Contents

Abbreviations xxi

Historical Introduction xxv

Statement of Editorial Principles c

Textual Introduction cvi

Uncollected Prose Writings

Thoughts on the Religion of the Middle Ages (Christian Disciple and Theological Review, November-December 1822) 1

An Extract from Unpublished Travels in the East (The Offering for 1829) 10

[Review of A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship] (Christian Examiner, March 1831) 12

A Historical Discourse, Delivered before the Citizens of Concord, 12th September, 1835. On the Second Centennial Anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town (1835) 17

[Review of Lemuel Shattuck, History of the Town of Concord] (Yeoman's Gazette, 3 October 1835) 55

Preface of the American Editors (Thomas Carlyle, Sartor Resartus, 1836) 56

Michael Angelo (North American Review, January 1837) 58

Advertisement (Thomas Carlyle, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, 1838) 75

Milton (North American Review, July 1838) 77

The Editors to the Reader (Dial, July 1840) 95

Thoughts on Modern Literature (Dial, October 1840) 99

New Poetry (Dial, October 1840) 121

[Review of Richard Henry Dana, Jr., Two Years before the Mast] (Dial, October 1840) 137

[Review of Jones Very, Essays and Poems] (Dial, July 1841) 138

Walter Savage Landor (Dial, October 1841) 140

Ezra Ripley, D.D. (Concord Republican, 1 October 1841) 151

The Senses and the Soul (Dial, January 1842) 154

Transcendentalism (Dial, January 1842) 161

Obituary [of Hannah Joy] (Christian Register, 2 April 1842) 166

Preliminary Note [Henry David Thoreau, "Natural History of Massachusetts"] (Dial, July 1842) 168

Prayers (Dial, July 1842) 169

Fourierism and the Socialists (Dial, July 1842) 174

Chardon Street and Bible Conventions (Dial, July 1842) 179

Agriculture of Massachusetts (Dial, July 1842) 191

Record of the Months (Dial, July 1842) 195

[Review of George Borrow, The Zincali] 195

[Review of James Lockhart, Ancient Spanish Ballads] 197

[Review of George H. Colton, Tecumseh: A Poem] 198

[Review of The Cambridge Miscellany of Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy] 198

[Notice of Orestes A. Brownson, A Letter to Rev. W. E. Channing] 199

[Notice of Novalis, Henry of Ofterdingen] 199

[Notice of Caroline Southey, Chapters on Churchyards] 199

[Notice of the London Phalanx] 199

Intelligence (Dial, July 1842) 200

Exploring Expedition 200

Association of State Geologists 201

Harvard University 202

[Wordsworth's new poems and other news] 203

[Tennyson] 204

[Henry Taylor, John Sterling, Thomas Carlyle] 204

Berlin 205

New Jerusalem Church 205

English Reformers (Dial, October 1842) 207

[Introductory note to Charles Lane, "James Pierrepont Greaves"] (Dial, October 1842) 231

[Introductory note to Samuel Gray Ward, "The Gallery"] (Dial, October 1842) 232

Editor's Table (Dial, October 1842) 233

[Papers from England] 233

[John A. Heraud's lectures] 233

[Charles Lane and Henry G. Wright] 234

[French journals] 234

Berlin 235

American Editor's Notice (Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, 1843) 238

Literary Intellignece (Dial, January 1843) 239

Record of the Months (Dial, January 1843) 241

[Review of Confessions of St. Augustine] 241

[English books] 242

Goethe and Swedenborg 243

Europe and European Books (Dial, April 1843) 244

[Review of George Borrow, The Bible in Spain] (Dial, April 1843) 255

Ethnical Scriptures. Extracts from the Desatir (Dial, July 1843) 256

Past and Present (Dial, July 1843) 261

[Introductory note to Samuel Gray Ward, "Notes on Art and Architecture"] (Dial, July 1843) 268

[Notice to Correspondents] (Dial, July 1843) 269

Record of the Months (Dial, July 1843) 270

[Review of John Pierpont, Anti-Slavery Poems] 270

[Review of William Lloyd Garrison, Sonnets and Other Poems] 270

[Review of Nathaniel W. Coffin, America, an Ode: and Other Poems] 271

[Review of William Ellery Channing, Poems] 271

[Review of Fredrika Bremer, The H-Family and The President's Daughters] 272

To Correspondents (Dial, July 1843) 273

Mr. Channing's Poems (United States Magazine, and Democratic Review, September 1843) 274

A Letter (Dial, October 1843) 289

[Notices of books] (Dial, October 1843) 300

An Address Delivered in the Court-House in Concord, Massachusetts, on 1st August, 1844, on the Anniversary of the Emancipation of the Negroes in the British West Indies (1844) 301

The Garden of Plants. A Leaf from a Journal (The Gift, 1844) 328

[Introductory note to Henry David Thoreau, "Pindar"] (Dial, January 1844) 332

Deutsche Schnellpost (Dial, January 1844) 333

The Tragic (Dial, April 1844) 334

To the Public (Massachusetts Quarterly Review, December 1847) 341

[Review of John Sterling, Essays and Tales] (Massachusetts Quarterly Review, September 1848) 348

New Translation of Dante (Massachusetts Quarterly Review, September 1848) 350

War (Æsthetic Papers, 1849) 351

[Review of Arthur Hugh Clough, The Bothie of Toper-na-Fuosich] (Massachusetts Quarterly Review, March 1849) 365

Mr. R. W. Emerson's Remarks at the Kansas Relief Meeting in Cambridge, Wednesday Evening, Sept. 10 (1856) 371

Samuel Hoar (Putnam's Monthly Magazine, December 1856) 376

Character of Samuel Hoar (Monthly Religious Magazine, January 1857) 381

Amos Bronson Alcott (The New American Cyclopædia, 1858) 385

[Address at the John Brown Relief Meeting] (18 November 1859) 387

Speech at the John Brown Relief Meeting at Salem (6 January 1860) 391

American Civilization (Atlantic Monthly, April 1862) 394

Henry D. Thoreau (Boston Daily Advertiser, 8 May 1862) 411

Thoreau (Atlantic Monthly, August 1862) 413

The President's Proclamation (Atlantic Monthly, November 1862) 432

Saadi (Atlantic Monthly, July 1864) 439

Editor's Notice (Henry David Thoreau, Letters to Various Persons, 1865) 446

Character (North American Review, April 1866) 447

[Remarks on the Character of George L. Stearns] (14 April 1867) 465

Address [at the Dedication of the Soldiers' Monument, Concord, 19 April 1867] 470

Mrs. Sarah A. Ripley (Boston Daily Advertiser, 31 July 1867) 487

[Speech at the Reception of the Chinese Embassy] (21 August 1868) 490

Introduction (Plutarch's Morals, 1870) 493

Preface (William Ellery Channing, The Wanderer, 1871) 510

Address [at the Dedication of the New Building for the Concord Free Public Library, 1 October 1873] 513

Preface (Parnassus, 1875) 521

Address [at the Unveiling of the Minute-Man Statue, Concord, 19 April 1875] 528

Miscellaneous Items

[Prospectus for Thomas Carlyle, The History of the French Revolution] (1837) 531

[Advertisement for "Human Culture" lecture series] (Boston Daily Advertiser, 8 November 1837) 531

Prospectus [Thomas Carlyle, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, 1838] 532

Carlyle's Miscellanies (Christian Register and Boston Observer, 7 July 1838) 533

Carlyle's Letters and Speeches of Cromwell (Boston Daily Advertiser, 31 January 1846) 533

[Advertising blurb for Jean Ingelow, The High Tide] (1864) 533

[Advertising blurb for William Rounseville Alger, The Poetry of the Orient] (1864) 533

[Advertising blurb for The Complete Works of Charles Sumner] (1874) 534

Notes 535

Appendix: List of line-end hyphenation 927

Index 935

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