College Girl

College Girl

3.6 29
by Patricia Weitz
     
 

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“A raw and resonant debut novel” (Megan McCafferty) and a vivid portrait of life on a modern college campus.

College senior Natalie Bloom is beautiful and ambitious, but also painfully insecure. At twenty, she’s still a virgin, never even having had a boyfriend. At school, Natalie hides out most weekends in the library—until she

Overview

“A raw and resonant debut novel” (Megan McCafferty) and a vivid portrait of life on a modern college campus.

College senior Natalie Bloom is beautiful and ambitious, but also painfully insecure. At twenty, she’s still a virgin, never even having had a boyfriend. At school, Natalie hides out most weekends in the library—until she meets Patrick, her fantasy (she thinks) of a cultured, intellectual Prince Charming. But the more time they spend together, the more Patrick brings out her worst insecurities. And before Natalie’s ready, she winds up losing her virginity— and her sense of direction, as her emotional responses take a dangerously self-destructive turn. Soon it’ll take only the most extreme measures to reclaim her sense of self, her confidence, and her ambition.

Insightful, moving, and achingly self-aware, College Girl is an intensely real portrait of a character whose insecurities are recognizable to us all, and of a time of life that changes everything.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Weitz takes a weak stab at a collegiate version of Prep in this disappointing me-too. Beautiful but virginal Natalie Bloom, a student at the University of Connecticut, has traded her working-class past for a spot at the bourgeois party school. While she maintains good grades, she is less successful in the social scene-a menacing environment where horny frat boys lurk in dark corners and couples easily betray each other-until she meets Patrick in, naturally, the library. Though Natalie insists she's shy, her dialogue with men is snappy and direct, and she and Patrick move toward dating in a series of dull getting-to-know-you conversations. When the relationship turns sexual, Natalie finds herself doubtful about his intentions, but she soldiers on until a weakly developed subplot about her brother's suicide somehow brings her to her senses. Without a comprehensible or urgent plot, the novel relies on its characters, but bland Natalie is surrounded by equally forgettable, interchangeable supporting personalities. When Natalie finally does find her happy ending, the reader won't really care. (Jan.)

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Library Journal

Natalie Bloom, the first girl in her family of six older brothers to attend (or even want to attend) college, has finally transferred to a big university halfway through her junior year. She's spent a couple of years proving herself at a community college, developing an addiction to earning A's after having been labeled a slacker for most of her life (she is, after all, one of those Blooms). She studies Russian history because history comes easily to her-she memorizes facts and she's fascinated by other people's lives. When she meets Patrick one night (studying in the library, of course), she embarks on a journey of self-discovery; while not your typical coming-of-age, Natalie's relationship with Patrick leads her to stark revelations. This debut novel unwraps an intriguing downward spiral, deftly portraying social and psychological implications of college life. Natalie's need to come to terms with her history, slowly revealed throughout, is well worth the read. Recommended for all fiction collections. [The author is married to filmmaker Paul Weitz (The Golden Compass; About a Boy ).-Ed.]-Julie Kane, Sweet Briar Coll. Lib., VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594488535
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
12/26/2008
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
5.48(w) x 8.26(h) x 1.02(d)
Age Range:
18 - 14 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"A sensitive yet laser-precise look at the joy (and indignity) of college life."
-Diablo Cody, Oscar(r)-winning screenwriter of Juno

"Weitz's prose is insightful, and Natalie's rocky coming-of-age tale...[is] a compelling read."
-USA Today

"Weitz is so adept at capturing the pain and insecurity attached to campus life and love, it's impossible to read without squirming-or at least without recalling the stupid decisions of your own early 20s."
-Entertainment Weekly

Meet the Author

Patricia Weitz has worked for The Nation, The New Yorker, and Los Angeles Times. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, the filmmaker Paul Weitz, and their two children.

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College Girl 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Volleyballplayer21 More than 1 year ago
College Girl is something that I've never read before. This book can connect you in life feeling those emotions that Natile had. At one point all of us had those feelings about a guy not knowing what to do or how to act. While reading this book I couldn't put it down, it kept catching my attention I guess you may say. But what I'm trying to say is that it's a great book and I recommanded a lot of my friends to read, they loved the book.
Dulcibelle More than 1 year ago
This book was almost painful to read. Not because of the writing - that was pretty good; almost stream of consciousness but with better grammar and sentence construction. No, the painful part of this was the main character, Natalie Bloom. A twenty year old college student just going to UConn after spending time at community college first, Natalie has no self-esteem and isn't sure how to interact with the other students around her. Weitz makes us feel her pain, her uncertainty. The novel covers the semester that Natalie "grows up" if you will, and describes, in painful detail, all the false steps Natalie takes.

Maybe the reason this was so hard to read is that many of the feelings expressed by Natalie are so familiar. I imagine that most every woman in the world has felt them at some time.
Grizelda More than 1 year ago
I know I like a book if 1) I read it all the way through, and 2) I don't want the book to end. This book was like that. Boy, if college was like that in the 90's, I am glad I graduated in the late 60's! Realistic, always interesting, well written, I cared for the characters. Highly recommended for a good read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mine
Mistiq More than 1 year ago
I loved this book I finished it in a day. I am a college student only just at a community college for now but I loved it. I loved the book Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld too and this was a college version of that. I think this was better. I never wanted this book to end as soon as I finished it I wanted more to read.
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eak321 More than 1 year ago
Did you feel alone, isolated, unattractive, or nerdy in college? Then you'll relate to Patricia Weitz' novel COLLEGE GIRL. The novel was written from the point of view of Natalie, the only girl and youngest child of a fairly redneck family. She's also the only one in her family to go to college. She does exceptionally well, immersing herself in her studies...until she meets a boy. Not just any boy, but the first boy to pay her any attention. What follows is very realistic, as Natalie becomes consumed in wanting this boy to like her even more, even if it means letting her schoolwork (and subsequent grades) slide. It's a situation that feels all too real. Who hasn't become so infatuated with their first crush that it takes precedence over all else? In fact, it feels so intense in your mind that it blinds you from seeing the true situation and makes you think that there is more there than there actually is. I enjoyed the light read that COLLEGE GIRL provided, and it brought back some dormant memories of my own college days of isolation, making friends, having crushes, making poor decisions, and coming to terms with myself as an individual. Weitz' writing is very conversational, and the dialogue and inner thoughts of Natalie were perfectly written.
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sara_c907 More than 1 year ago
I'll admit, I wasn't thrilled with some of the outcomes of the characters, but I think that's because I had higher hopes for them. Peter, for example. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It's a great debut book, that's for sure. It dragged on a bit, but I don't regret reading it for a second.
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Im all handcuffed. ;-)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Smiles at Josh. "Its kinda pirplish bluish with lots of pockets on the outside. Its got a ky chain attached to it with my ijitials, AGM on itm"
lsbball More than 1 year ago
This book was soo boring! I gave it until chapter 5 to grab my attention and it never did. I never looked forward to reading it cuz it was just miserable. I thought the book was pretty lame too. Hope nobody else waste their time on this book.
ILgirl07 More than 1 year ago
Very similar to Curtis Sittenfeld's Prep but this book takes place in college. Do yourself a favor and read Prep instead - this book seemed to drag on.