College Greek course in English [NOOK Book]

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
neer Herodotus. Again, it entered into the plan of Herodotus, to report to us a great many things reported to him, that he by no means asked us to credit, that, in fact, he did not credit himself. Herodotus's credulity, together ...
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College Greek course in English

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NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1884 volume)
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
neer Herodotus. Again, it entered into the plan of Herodotus, to report to us a great many things reported to him, that he by no means asked us to credit, that, in fact, he did not credit himself. Herodotus's credulity, together with his plan of reporting reports—to a great extent irrespectively of their HERODOTUS. probable truth—has gained for him a traditional and popular repute of untrustworthiness that he is far from deserving. The tendency of recent historical criticism, applied in the light of geographical exploration and archaeological discovery,has been steadily in the direction of raising the credit of Herodotus as a conscientious historian. This, however, must not be taken to mean that the whole of what Herodotus tells us is, in the main, to be accepted for true. So far from it, what Herodotus tells us will, when carefully examined, be found, in no small part, to consist of stories that we are compelled to reject for false. But then such stories in Herodotus are incidental and episodical in their nature. They may easily be detached from the main thread of the narrative, the main thread of the narrative remaining unharmed and continuous without them. Besides, although Herodotus was certainly not furnished with that guardian historical skepticism which served Thucydides so well in sifting for historical truth, and though therefore Herodotus sometimes himself believed where Thucydides would wisely have rejected ; yet, as we have already said, and as in justice to Herodotus should never be forgotten, this faithful historical reporter generally introduced the things which we are forced to regard as not true, under a sufficiently distinct caveat of warning to the reader that the author was simply telling a tale as it was told to him. Herodotus was very painstaking in ...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940017035832
  • Publisher: New York, Phillips & Hunt
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1884 volume
  • File size: 596 KB

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neer Herodotus. Again, it entered into the plan of Herodotus, to report to us a great many things reported to him, that he by no means asked us to credit, that, in fact, he did not credit himself. Herodotus's credulity, together with his plan of reporting reports to a great extent irrespectively of their HERODOTUS. probable truth has gained for him a traditional and popular repute of untrustworthiness that he is far from deserving. The tendency of recent historical criticism, applied in the light of geographical exploration and archaeological discovery,has been steadily in the direction of raising the credit of Herodotus as a conscientious historian. This, however, must not be taken to mean that the whole of what Herodotus tells us is, in the main, to be accepted for true. So far from it, what Herodotus tells us will, when carefully examined, be found, in no small part, to consist of stories that we are compelled to reject for false. But then such stories in Herodotus are incidental and episodical in their nature. They may easily be detached from the main thread of the narrative, the main thread of the narrative remaining unharmed and continuous without them. Besides, although Herodotus was certainly not furnished with that guardian historical skepticism which served Thucydides so well in sifting for historical truth, and though therefore Herodotus sometimes himself believed where Thucydides would wisely have rejected ; yet, as we have already said, and as in justice to Herodotus should never be forgotten, this faithful historical reporter generally introduced the things which we are forced to regard as not true, under a sufficiently distinct caveat of warning to the reader thatthe author was simply telling a tale as it was told to him. Herodotus was very painstaking in ...
Read More Show Less

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