College of One by Sheilah Graham | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
College of One

College of One

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by Sheilah Graham
     
 

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The moving story of how F. Scott Fitzgerald—washed up, alcoholic and ill—dedicated himself to devising a heartfelt course in literature for the woman he loved.

In 1937, on the night of her engagement to the Marquess of Donegall, Sheilah Graham met F. Scott Fitzgerald at a party in Hollywood. Graham, a British-born journalist, broke off her

Overview

The moving story of how F. Scott Fitzgerald—washed up, alcoholic and ill—dedicated himself to devising a heartfelt course in literature for the woman he loved.

In 1937, on the night of her engagement to the Marquess of Donegall, Sheilah Graham met F. Scott Fitzgerald at a party in Hollywood. Graham, a British-born journalist, broke off her engagement, and until Fitzgerald had a fatal heart attack in her apartment in 1940, the two writers lived the fervid, sometimes violent affair that is memorialized here with unprecedented intimacy.

When they met, Fitzgerald’s fame had waned. He battled crippling alcoholism while writing screenplays to support his daughter and institutionalized wife. Graham’s star, however, was rising, to the point where she became Hollywood’s highest-paid, best-read gossip columnist. But if Fitzgerald had lived out his “crack-up” in public, Graham kept her demons secret—such as that she believed herself to be “a fascinating fake who pulled the wool over Hollywood’s eyes.’’

Most poignantly, she keenly felt her lack of education, and Fitzgerald rose to the occasion. He became her passionate tutor, guiding her through a curriculum of his own design: a college of one. Graham loved him the more for it, writing the book as a tribute. As she explained, “An unusual man’s ideas on what constituted an education had to be preserved. It is a new chapter to add to what is already known about an author who has been microscopically investigated in all the other areas of his life.”

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The story of a sad and splendid love.”  —Chicago Tribune

“It’s a fascinating (and almost forgotten) book.”  —James L. W. West III, general editor of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612192833
Publisher:
Melville House Publishing
Publication date:
05/28/2013
Series:
Neversink Series
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
1,156,537
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“The story of a sad and splendid love.”  —Chicago Tribune

“It’s a fascinating (and almost forgotten) book.”  —James L. W. West III, general editor of The Cambridge Edition of the Works of F. Scott Fitzgerald

Meet the Author

Born Lily Sheil in 1904, the daughter of Jewish Ukranian immigrants, SHEILAH GRAHAM was raised in a London orphanage. She emigrated to New York in 1933 and to Hollywood two years later. In 1964, Time magazine reported that Graham had “deposed Hopper and Parsons as doyenne of the Hollywood columnists.’’ She had her own radio and television programs and wrote several books. In 1959, Beloved Infidel, a bestselling memoir of her affair with F. Scott Fitzgerald, became a film starring Gregory Peck and Deborah Kerr. Graham died in 1988.

WENDY FAIREY, Sheilah Graham's daughter, teaches English literature and creative writing at Brooklyn College.  She is the author of One of the Family, a memoir, and Full House, a collection of linked stories. 

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College of One 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
juleecm1 More than 1 year ago
I wanted to love this book. Sheilah Graham led an unusual life for a woman in her time. She was F. Scott Fitzgerald's last lover. He helped teach her a lot and she grew intellectually under his tutelage. What's not to love? First off, the book was boring. I couldn't believe it. And all she really talked about was herself. She had very few insights into her own life or Fitzgerald's, and complained incessantly about her obnoxious, well-off relatives who treated her and her mother disrespectfully. And her mother! You'd think the woman was Satan incarnate the way Ms. Graham complained about her. However, as far as I could tell the mother was, not by choice, a career woman before her time who had to raise her only daughter on her own and simply wasn't cut out to be a warm "mommy" type. I kept reading until the end because I'm stubborn, and thought maybe the interested parts would be unveiled, but I found this book a waste of time. I know little more about Fitzgerald's inner life than I did before reading this, and Sheilah Graham strikes me as a selfish, not very reflective woman who I would not have liked had I known her.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago