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Overview

This book presents fundamental physics principles in a clear, concise manner. The Sixth Edition adds a focus on biomedical applications of physical principles, while continuing to emphasize conceptual understanding as the basis for mastering a variety of problem-solving tools.

Provides a wide range of relevant applications and illustrative examples to help students understand concepts and relate physics principles to everyday life. Topics include mechanics, thermodynamics, oscillations and wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics.

For anyone hoping to learn more about the fundamentals of physics and applying principles to a variety of real-world situations, devices, and topics.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Updated from its 1997 edition, this introductory college level physics text is strong on visual tools, from abundant color illustrations, photographs, and diagrams to "learn by drawing" segments and "insight" boxes presenting concrete applications of physics principles. Chapter reviews include a variety of exercises, with answers provided at the end of the text. The volume's 30 chapters are organized into six sections: mechanics, thermodynamics, oscillations and wave motion, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Appendices list mathematical relationships, kinetic theory of gases, planetary data, alphabetical listing of chemical elements, and properties of selected isotopes. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205121168
  • Publisher: Allyn & Bacon, Inc.
  • Publication date: 1/1/1990

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

We continue to believe that there are two goals any introductory physics course must accomplish, regardless of the approach, emphasis, or pedagogical techniques: (1) to impart an understanding of the basic physics principles and (2) to enable students to solve a variety of reasonable problems in topics presented in the text material.

These goals are linked. An understanding of physical principles is of limited use if it does not enable students to solve problems. Physics is a problem-solving science— and in the real world, students will be evaluated on their ability to produce correct answers on final exams or on the MCAT. Yet learning to solve problems by rote is not the same thing as learning physics. Knowing and doing— insight and skill— must go hand in hand.

Any deficiency in meeting the first goal is likely to be obvious. Test scores quickly get the attention of both test takers and test graders. Low grades demoralize instructors while discouraging students who, understandably, conclude that physics is "too hard" for any but the phenomenally gifted. Deficiencies in meeting the second goal tend to be more subtle. Research in physics education has shown that a surprising number of students who learn to solve typical problems well enough to pass examinations do so without ever arriving at a real understanding of the most elementary physical concepts. Such students often get high marks on exams, yet when asked to answer simple, qualitative questions designed to test their grasp of basic principles, they betray a surprising lack of insight. Simply put, they can solve quantitative problems and get the right answer, butthey do not know why it is right.

Achieving Our Goals— Features of the Fourth Edition

Most of the specific features of College Physics can be understood in light of these goals.

Conceptual Basis. We believe that giving students a secure grasp of physical principles will almost invariably enhance their problem-solving abilities. Central to this belief is an approach to the development of problem-solving skills that stresses the understanding of basic concepts, rather than the mechanical and rote use of formulas, as the essential foundation. Throughout the writing of College Physics, we have organized discussions and incorporated pedagogical tools to ensure that conceptual insight drives the development of practical skills.

Concise Coverage. To maintain a sharp focus on essential concepts, a book should emphasize the basics and minimize superfluous material. Topics of marginal interest have been avoided, as have those that present formal or mathematical difficulties for students. Similarly, we have not wasted space deriving relationships when they shed no additional light on the principle involved. It is usually more important for students in a course such as this to understand what a relationship means and how it can be used rather than the mathematical or analytical techniques employed to derive it.

Applications. College Physics has always been known for the strong mix of applications related to technology, science, architecture, medicine, and everyday life in its Insight boxes and text narrative. While the Fourth Edition continues to have a wider range of applications than do most texts, we have also increased the number of biological applications in recognition of the high percentage of pre-med and allied health majors who take this course. Some examples are the new Insight boxes Human Body Temperature, Electric Potential and Nerve Signal Transmission, and Magnetism in Nature. Overall, one-third of our Insight boxes are new. The Fourth Edition also contains many new applications within the text narrative and has an increased emphasis on real-world and applied topics in the worked Examples and end-of-chapter Exercises. A list of the most important applications with page references is found on p. xiii.

Visualization: "Learn by Drawing." visualization is one of the most important problemsolving tools in physics. In many cases, if students can make a sketch of a problem, they can solve it. "Learn by Drawing" features offer students specific help on making certain types of sketches,and graphs that will provide key insights into a variety of physical situations. The Fourth Edition has three new Learn by Drawing features, on the following topics: Cartesian coordinates and one dimensional motion, oscillation in a parabolic potential well, and the independence of potential difference on reference point.

Demonstrations. Photo sequences of 16 physics demonstrations bring physical principles to life, helping students understand that the information and equations on the page describe real-world phenomena.

Integrated Learning Objectives. Specific learning objectives, located at the beginning of each chapter section, help students structure their reading and facilitate review.

Suggested Problem-Solving Procedure. An extensive section (Section 1.7) provides a framework for thinking about problem solving. This section includes:

  • An overview of problem-solving strategies;
  • A seven-step procedure that is general enough to apply to most problems in physics but is easily used in specific situations;
  • Three Examples that illustrate the problemsolving process, showing how the general procedure is applied in practice.
Problem-Solving Strategies and Hints. The initial treatment of problem solving is followed up throughout College Physics with an abundance of suggestions, tips, cautions, shortcuts, and useful techiques for solving specific kinds of problems. These strategies and hints help students apply general principles to specific contexts as well as avoid common pitfalls and misunderstandings.

Conceptual Examples. College Physics was among the first physics text to include examples that are conceptual in nature in addition to quantitative ones. Our Conceptual Examples ask students to think about a physical situation and choose the correct prediction on the basis of an understanding of relevant principles. The discussion that follows (Reasoning and Answer) explains clearly how the correct answer can be identified as well as why the other answers are wrong.

More Explanation in Examples. Too many solutions to worked examples in other texts rely on formulas such as "From Eq. 6.7 we have. . . ." We have tried to make the solutions to in-text Examples as clear, patient, and detailed as possible. The aim is not merely to show students which equations to use but to explain the strategy being employed and the role of each step in the overall plan. Students are encouraged to learn the "why" of each step along with the "how." This technique will make it easier for students to apply the demonstrated techniques to other problems that are not identical in structure.

Thinking It Through. New to the Fourth Edition, every worked Example now includes a "Thinking It Through" section after the problem statement and before the Solution to focus students on the critical thinking and analysis they should do before beginning to use equations.

Follow-up Exercises. Follow-up Exercises at the end of each Conceptual Example and each regular worked Example further reinforce the importance of conceptual understanding and offer additional practice. (Answers to Follow-up Exercises are given at the back of the book.)

Chapter Review. Each Chapter Review is made up of three parts:

  1. Important Terms: A listing, with page references, of the key terms introduced in the chapter that students should be able to define and explain.
  2. Important Concepts: A summary of the key principles of each chapter.
  3. Important Equations: A listing, cross-referenced to the equations in the chapter, of the major laws and mathematical relationships introduced. Specific applicability and limiting conditions are clearly stated for each expression.
Exercises. Each chapter ends with a wealth of Exercises, organized by chapter section and ranked by general level of difficulty. In addition, the Exercises offer the following special features to help students refine both their conceptual understanding and their problem-solving skills:
  • Integration of Conceptual and Quantitative Exercises. To help break down the artificial and ultimately counterproductive barrier between conceptual questions and quantitative problems, we do not distinguish between these categories in the end-of-chapter Exercises. Instead, each section begins with a series of multiple-choice and short-answer questions that provide content review, test conceptual understanding, and ask students to reason from principles. The aim is to show students that the same kind of conceptual insight is required regardless of whether the desired answer involves words, equations, or numbers. The conceptual or "thought" questions are marked by a bold TQ in the Annotated Instructor's Edition of the text for easy reference when assigning questions. Unlike most other texts, College Physics offers short answers to all odd-numbered conceptual questions (as well as to all odd-numbered quantitative problems) in the back of the text so that students can check their understanding. About 35% of all Thought Questions and Exercises in the Fourth Edition are new.
  • Interactive Exercises. New to the Fourth Edition, many of the end-of-chapter Exercises are keyed to simulations on Prentice Hall's multimedia study guide, the Interactive Journey through Physics. Exercises that have a corresponding simulation are indicated with a CD-ROM icon. The College Physics Media Pack (ISBN 0-13-085346-1), a specially discounted package consisting of the text and Interactive Journey through Physics CD-ROM, includes a crossreference/location guide to allow you to match Exercise numbers to corresponding simulations.
  • Paired and Trio Exercises. Most numbered sections include at least one set of paired Exercises and, new to the Fourth Edition, one set of trio Exercises, that deal with similar situations. The first problem in a pair or trio is solved in the Study Guide; the second problem, exploring a similar situation, has only an answer at the back of the book, thereby encouraging students to work out the problem on their own. The third problem in a trio is answered in the Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual

    .

  • Additional Exercises. Each chapter includes a supplemental section of Additional Exercises drawn from all sections of the chapter to ensure that students can synthesize concepts.
The Absolutely Zero Tolerance for Errors Club (The AZTECs). This team approach to accuracy checking worked quite well in the third edition, so we did it again. Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the author of our Instructor's Solutions Manual, headed the AZTEC team and was supported by the text authors and two additional accuracy checkers, Bill McCorkle of West Liberty State University and Dave Curott of the University of North Alabama. Each member of the team individually and independently worked all end-of-chapter Exercises. The results were then collected, and any discrepancies were resolved by a "team" discussion. All data in the chapters, as well as the answers at the back of the book, were checked and rechecked in first and second page proofs. In addition, two other physics teachers— J. Erik Hendrickson and K. W. Nicholson— read all first pages in detail, checking for errors in the chapter narrative and text art. Although it is probably not humanly possible to produce a physics text with absolutely no errors, that was our goal; we worked very hard to make the book as error-free as we could.

New Multimedia Explorations of Physics

New to the Fourth Edition are a state-of-the art Website and a CD-ROM media package.

Companion Website. Our Website (at http://www.prenhall.com/wilson), with contributions from leaders in physics education research, provides students with a variety of interactive explorations of each chapter's topics, easily accommodating differences in learning styles. Student tools include Warm-Ups, Puzzles, and "What Is Physics Good For?" applications by Gregor Novak and Andy Gavrin (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis); award-winning Java-based Physlet problems by Wolfgang Christian (Davidson College); algorithmically generated numerical Practice Problems, multiple-choice Practice Questions, online Destinations, and Net Search key words by Carl Adler (East Carolina University); Ranking Task Exercises edited by Tom O'Kuma (Lee College), David Maloney (Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne) and Curtis Hieggelke (Joliet Junior College); downloadable PDF files for a Mechanics Problem-Solving Workbook by Dan Smith (South Carolina State University); and MCAT Questions by Glen Terrell (University of Texas at Arlington) and from ARCO's MCAT Supercourse. Using the Preferences module at the opening of the site or the tool in the "Results reporter" part of each module, students can, at a professor's request, have the results of their work on the Companion Website e-mailed to the professor or teaching assistant. Instructor tools include on-line grading capabilities and a Syllabus Manager. See pp. xxviii-xxiv for further information about the modules in this site.

Media Pack for College Physics, Fourth Edition (0-13-085346-1). College Physics, Fourth Edition can be purchased in a specially discounted package called the Media Pack, which includes the student text, the dual-platform Interactive Journey through Physics (IJTP) CDROM by Cindy Schwarz (Vassar College) and Logal, Inc., Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide, 1999 by Andrew Stull, and a cross-reference/location guide to correlate Exercises in the text marked with a CD-ROM icon and corresponding simulations on the IJTP CD-ROM. This CDROM is a multimedia study guide for physics, with simulations, animations, videos, hyperlinked topic reviews, MCAT review questions and problems (including Ranking Task Exercises, contextrich problems, and video problems) for mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and light and optics. It also includes a built-in scientific calculator with a library of key physics constants, a glossary, and pertinent tables and equations. See pp. xxx-xxxi for a complete description of the types of materials on the IJTP CD-ROM.

Additional Supplements

The pedagogical value of College Physics is enhanced by a variety of supplements developed to address the needs of both students and instructors.

For the Instructor

Annotated Instructor's Edition (0-13-084167-6). The margins of the Annotated Instructor's Edition (AIE) contain an abundance of suggestions for classroom demonstrations and activities, along with teaching tips (points to emphasize, discussion suggestions, and common misunderstandings to avoid). In addition, the AIE contains:

  • Icons that identify each illustration reproduced as a transparency in the Transparency Pack.
  • Answers to end-of-chapter Exercises (following each Exercise).
  • References to applicable video demonstrations from the Physics You Can See videotape.

Instructor's Solutions Manual (0-13-084168-4). Prepared by Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the Instructor's Solutions Manual supplies answers with complete, worked-out solutions to all end-of-chapter Exercises. Each solution has been checked for accuracy by a minimum of five instructors. This manual is also available electronically on both Windows and Macintosh platforms.

Test Item File (0-13-084160-9). Fully revised by Dave Curott of the University of North Alabama, the Test Item File now offers more than 2300 questions— approximately 30% of them new to this edition— and includes several new conceptual questions per chapter. The questions are now organized and referenced by type and by section.

Prentice Hall Custom Test (Windows: 0-13-084171-4; Macintosh: 0-13084172-2). Based on the powerful testing technology developed by Engineering Software Associates, Inc. (ESA), the Prentice Hall Custom Test allows instructors to create and tailor exams to their own needs. With the On-line Testing Program, exams can also be administered on-line and data can then be automatically transferred for evaluation. A comprehensive desk reference guide is included, along with on-line assistance.

Transparency Pack (0-13-084175-7). The Transparency Pack contains more than 300 full-color acetates of text illustrations useful for class lectures. It is available upon adoption of the text.

Physics You Can See Video Demonstrations (0-205-12393-7). Each segment, 25 minutes long, demonstrates a classical physics experiment. Eleven segments are included, such as "Coin & Feather" (acceleration due to gravity), "Monkey & Gun" (rate of vertical free fall), "Swivel Hips" (force pairs), and "Collapse a Can" (atmospheric pressure).

Presentation Manager CD-ROM (0-13-084174-9). This new CD-ROM contains all the text art and videos from the Physics You Can See videotape as well as additional lab and demonstration videos and animations from the Interactive Journey through Physics CD-ROM, which is also available from Prentice Hall (see below).

Just-in-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Technology (013-085034-9). Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an exciting new teaching and learning methodology designed to engage students. Using feedback from pre-class Web assignments, instructors can adjust classroom lessons so that students receive rapid response to the specific questions and problems they are having— instead of more generic lectures that may or may not address topics with which students actually need help. Many teachers have found that this process makes students become active and interested learners. In this resource book for educators, authors Gregor Novak (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis), Evelyn Patterson (United States Air Force Academy), Andrew Gavrin (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis), and Wolfgang Christian (Davidson College) more fully explain what Just-in-Time Teaching is, its underlying goals and philosophies, and how to implement it. They also provide an extensive section of tested resource materials that can be used in introductory physics courses with the JiTT approach.

For the Student

Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual (0-13-084365-2). Significantly revised by Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual presents chapter-by chapter reviews, chapter summaries, key terms, additional worked problems, and solutions to selected problems.

The New York Times "Themes of the Times" Program. This innovative program, made possible through an exclusive partnership between Prentice Hall and The New York Times, brings current and relevant applications into the classroom. Through this program, adopters of College Physics, Fourth Edition are eligible to receive our free, unique "mini-newspapers," which bring together a collection of the latest and best physics articles from the highly respected pages of The New York Times. They are updated annually and are free to qualified adopters up to the quantity of texts purchased. Contact your local representative for ordering.

MCAT Physics Study Guide (0-13-627951-1). This study resource by Joseph Boone of California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo references all of the physics topics on the MCAT to the appropriate sections in the text. Since most MCAT questions require more thought and reasoning than simply plugging numbers into an equation, this study guide is designed to refresh students' memory about the topics they've covered in class. Additional review, practice problems, and review questions are included.

Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide, 1999 (0-13-021308-X). This guide helps students gain a greater understanding of the Internet and the ways in which they can access information on the Web relating to their study of physics.

Other Related Multimedia Materials

Interactive Physics II Player Workbook (Windows: 0-13-667312-0; Macintosh: 0-13-477670-4). Written by Cindy Schwarz of Vassar College, this highly interactive workbook/software package contains simulation projects of varying difficulty. Each includes a physics review, simulation details, hints, an explanation of results, math help, and a self-test.

Interactive journey through Physics CD-ROM (0-13-254103-3). This highly interactive CD-ROM can be used as a stand-alone supplement for any introductory physics course or as a general reference tool. Through simulation, animation, video, and interactive problem solving, students can visualize difficult physics concepts in ways not available through the traditional lecture, lab, and text. The innovative concept checks and extension exercises within the simulations facilitate the reinforcement of important physical concepts. The content of this CDROM is organized according to the main topics in physics— mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and light and optics. The numerous analysis tools are easily navigated through a userfriendly interface. See the previous description under Media Pack and pp. xxx-xxxi for more detail about the IJTP CD-ROM, and see ordering information for the discounted price when purchased with College Physics, Fourth Edition, in the Media Pack.

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Table of Contents

Preface XV

 

1 Measurement and Problem Solving 1

Insight: 1.1 Why Study Physics? 2

1.1 Why and How We Measure 2

1.2 SI Units of Length, Mass, and Time 3

Insight: 1.2 What Is Time? 6

1.3 More about the Metric System 7

1.4 Unit Analysis 10

1.5 Unit Conversions 12

Insight: 1.3 Is Unit Conversion Important? 16

1.6 Significant Figures 17

1.7 Problem Solving 20

Chapter Review 24 Exercises 25

 

2 Kinematics: Description of Motion 32

2.1 Distance and Speed: Scalar Quantities 33

2.2 One-Dimensional Displacement and Velocity: Vector Quantities 35

Learn by Drawing: Cartesian Coordinates and One-Dimensional Displacement 35

2.3 Acceleration 40

Learn by Drawing: Signs of Velocity and Acceleration 42

2.4 Kinematic Equations (Constant Acceleration) 45

2.5 Free Fall 49

Insight: 2.1 Galileo Galilei and the Leaning Tower of Pisa 51

Chapter Review 56 Exercises 57

 

3 Motion in Two Dimensions 67

3.1 Components of Motion 68

3.2 Vector Addition and Subtraction 73

Learn by Drawing: Make a Sketch and Add Them Up 80

3.3 Projectile Motion 81

3.4 Relative Velocity 90

Chapter Review 94 Exercises 95

 

4 Force and Motion 103

4.1 The Concepts of Force and Net Force 104

4.2 Inertia and Newton’s First Law of Motion 105

4.3 Newton’s Second Law of Motion 106

Insight: 4.1 g’s of Force and Effects on the Human Body 108

4.4 Newton’s Third Law of Motion 112

Insight: 4.2 Sailing into the Wind–Tacking 115

4.5 More on Newton’s Laws: Free-Body Diagrams and Translational Equilibrium 116

Learn byDrawing: Forces on an Object on an Inclined Plane and Free-body Diagrams 116

4.6 Friction 121

Chapter Review 130 Exercises 131

 

5 Work and Energy 140

5.1 Work Done by a Constant Force 141

Learn by Drawing: Work: Area under the F-versus-x Curve 142

Learn by Drawing: Determining the Sign of Work 143

5.2 Work Done by a Variable Force 145

5.3 The Work—Energy Theorem: Kinetic Energy 148

5.4 Potential Energy 152

5.5 Conservation of Energy 155

Insight: 5.1 People Power: Using Body Energy 156

Learn by Drawing: Energy Exchanges: A Falling Ball 161

5.6 Power 164

Insight: 5.2 Hybrid Energy Conversion 164

Chapter Review 168 Exercises 169

 

6 Linear Momentum and Collisions 177

6.1 Linear Momentum 178

6.2 Impulse 182

6.3 Conservation of Linear Momentum 185

Insight: 6.1 The Automobile Air Bag and Martian Air Bags 186

6.4 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions 191

6.5 Center of Mass 198

6.6 Jet Propulsion and Rockets 204

Chapter Review 207 Exercises 207

 

7 Circular Motion and Gravitation 216

7.1 Angular Measure 217

7.2 Angular Speed and Velocity 219

Learn by Drawing: The Small-Angle Approximation 219

7.3 Uniform Circular Motion and Centripetal Acceleration 223

Insight: 7.1 The Centrifuge: Separating Blood Components 225

7.4 Angular Acceleration 228

7.5 Newton’s Law of Gravitation 231

Insight: 7.2 Space Exploration: Gravity Assists 238

7.6 Kepler’s Laws and Earth Satellites 238

Insight: 7.3 “Weightlessness”: Effects on the Human Body 245

Chapter Review 247 Exercises 248

 

8 Rotational Motion and Equilibrium 256

8.1 Rigid Bodies, Translations, and Rotations 257

8.2 Torque, Equilibrium, and Stability 259

8.3 Rotational Dynamics 270

Insight: 8.1 Stability in Action 271

8.4 Rotational Work and Kinetic Energy 277

8.5 Angular Momentum 280

Insight: 8.2 Slide or Roll to a Stop? Antilock Brakes 281

Chapter Review 287 Exercises 288

 

9 Solids and Fluids 297

9.1 Solids and Elastic Moduli 298

9.2 Fluids: Pressure and Pascal’s Principle 302

Insight: 9.1 Osteoporosis and Bone Mineral Density (BMD) 304

Insight: 9.2 An Atmospheric Effect: Possible Earaches 311

Insight: 9.3 Blood Pressure and Its Measurement 312

9.3 Buoyancy and Archimedes’ Principle 313

9.4 Fluid Dynamics and Bernoulli’s Equation 319

*9.5 Surface Tension, Viscosity, and Poiseuille’s Law 324

Insight: 9.4 The Lungs and Baby’s First Breath 325

Chapter Review 329 Exercises 330

 

10 Temperature and Kinetic Theory 338

10.1 Temperature and Heat 339

10.2 The Celsius and Fahrenheit Temperature Scales 340

Insight: 10.1 Human Body Temperature 343

10.3 Gas Laws, Absolute Temperature, and the Kelvin Temperature Scale 343

Insight: 10.2 Warm-Blooded versus Cold-Blooded 344

10.4 Thermal Expansion 350

Learn by Drawing: Thermal Area Expansion 351

10.5 The Kinetic Theory of Gases 354

Insight: 10.3 Physiological Diffusion in Life Processes 357

*10.6 Kinetic Theory, Diatomic Gases, and the Equipartition Theorem 357

Chapter Review 360 Exercises 361

 

11 Heat 367

11.1 Definition and Units of Heat 368

11.2 Specific Heat and Calorimetry 370

11.3 Phase Changes and Latent Heat 374

Learn by Drawing: From Cold Ice to Hot Steam 377

11.4 Heat Transfer 379

Insight: 11.1 Physiological Regulation of Body Temperature 380

Insight: 11.2 Physics, the Construction Industry, and Energy Conservation 384

Insight: 11.3 The Greenhouse Effect 388

Chapter Review 390 Exercises 391

 

12 Thermodynamics 397

12.1 Thermodynamic Systems, States, and Processes 398

12.2 The First Law of Thermodynamics 399

12.3 Thermodynamic Processes for an Ideal Gas 403

Learn by Drawing: Leaning on Isotherms 409

12.4 The Second Law of Thermodynamics and Entropy 410

Insight: 12.1 Life, Order, and the Second Law 414

12.5 Heat Engines and Thermal Pumps 414

Learn by Drawing: Representing Work in Thermal Cycles 415

Insight: 12.2 Thermodynamics and the Human Body 420

12.6 The Carnot Cycle and Ideal Heat Engines 422

Chapter Review 425 Exercises 426

 

13 Vibrations and Waves 433

13.1 Simple Harmonic Motion 434

Learn by Drawing: Oscillating in a Parabolic Potential Well 437

13.2 Equations of Motion 439

13.3 Wave Motion 446

13.4 Wave Properties 449

Insight: 13.1 Earthquakes, Seismic Waves, and Seismology 450

13.5 Standing Waves and Resonance 454

Insight: 13.2 Desirable and Undesirable Resonances 458

Chapter Review 459 Exercises 460

 

14 Sound 467

14.1 Sound Waves 468

Insight: 14.1 Ultrasound in Medicine 470

14.2 The Speed of Sound 471

14.3 Sound Intensity and Sound Intensity Level 474

Insight: 14.2 The Physiology and Physics of the Ear and Hearing 475

14.4 Sound Phenomena 481

14.5 The Doppler Effect 484

Insight: 14.3 Doppler Applications: Blood Cells and Raindrops 490

14.6 Musical Instruments and Sound Characteristics 491

Chapter Review 496 Exercises 498

 

15 Electric Charge, Forces, and Fields 505

15.1 Electric Charge 506

15.2 Electrostatic Charging 508

15.3 Electric Force 512

15.4 Electric Field 517

Learn by Drawing: Using the Superposition Principle to Determine the Electric Field Direction 518

Learn by Drawing: Sketching Electric Lines of Force 521

Insight: 15.1 Lightning and Lightning Rods 523

Insight: 15.2 Electric Fields in Law Enforcement and Nature: Stun Guns and Electric Fish 524

15.5 Conductors and Electric Fields 526

*15.6 Gauss’s Law for Electric Fields: A Qualitative Approach 528

Chapter Review 529 Exercises 530

 

16 Electric Potential, Energy, and Capacitance 536

16.1 Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential Difference 537

Learn by Drawing: ¢V Is Independent of Reference Point 538

16.2 Equipotential Surfaces and the Electric Field 543

Learn by Drawing: Graphical Relationship between Electric Field Lines and Equipotentials 547

16.3 Capacitance 549

Insight: 16.1 Electric Potential and Nerve Signal Transmission 552

16.4 Dielectrics 552

16.5 Capacitors in Series and in Parallel 557

Chapter Review 561 Exercises 562

 

17 Electric Current and Resistance 568

17.1 Batteries and Direct Current 569

Learn by Drawing: Sketching Circuits 571

17.2 Current and Drift Velocity 571

17.3 Resistance and Ohm’s Law 573

Insight: 17.1 The “Bio-Generation” of High Voltage 575

Insight: 17.2 Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) 578

17.4 Electric Power 580

Chapter Review 585 Exercises 586

 

18 Basic Electric Circuits 591

18.1 Resistances in Series, Parallel, and Series—Parallel Combinations 592

18.2 Multiloop Circuits and Kirchhoff’s Rules 599

Learn by Drawing: Kirchhoff Plots: A Graphical Interpretation of Kirchhoff’s Loop Theorem 602

18.3 RC Circuits 604

18.4 Ammeters and Voltmeters 607

Insight: 18.1 Applications of RC Circuits to Cardiac Medicine 608

18.5 Household Circuits and Electrical Safety 611

Insight: 18.2 Electricity and Personal Safety 614

Chapter Review 615 Exercises 616

 

19 Magnetism 623

19.1 Magnets, Magnetic Poles, and Magnetic Field Direction 624

19.2 Magnetic Field Strength and Magnetic Force 626

19.3 Applications: Charged Particles in Magnetic Fields 629

19.4 Magnetic Forces on Current-Carrying Wires 632

19.5 Applications: Current-Carrying Wires in Magnetic Fields 635

19.6 Electromagnetism: The Source of Magnetic Fields 637

19.7 Magnetic Materials 641

Insight: 19.1 The Magnetic Force in Future Medicine 642

*19.8 Geomagnetism: The Earth’s Magnetic Field 644

Insight: 19.2 Magnetism in Nature 645

Chapter Review 647 Exercises 648

 

20 Electromagnetic Induction and Waves 656

20.1 Induced emf: Faraday’s Law and Lenz’s Law 657

20.2 Electric Generators and Back emf 663

Insight: 20.1 Electromagnetic Induction at Work: Flashlights and Antiterrorism 664

Insight: 20.2 Electromagnetic Induction at Play: Hobbies and Transportation 666

20.3 Transformers and Power Transmission 668

20.4 Electromagnetic Waves 672

Chapter Review 679 Exercises 679

 

21 AC Circuits 686

21.1 Resistance in an AC Circuit 687

21.2 Capacitive Reactance 689

21.3 Inductive Reactance 691

21.4 Impedance: RLC Circuits 693

21.5 Circuit Resonance 697

Insight: 21.1 Oscillator Circuits: Broadcasters of Electromagnetic Radiation 699

Chapter Review 700 Exercises 701

 

22 Reflection and Refraction of Light 705

22.1 Wave Fronts and Rays 706

22.2 Reflection 707

22.3 Refraction 708

Learn by Drawing: Tracing the Reflected Rays 708

Insight: 22.1 A Dark, Rainy Night 709

Insight: 22.2 Negative Index of Refraction and the “Perfect” Lens 715

22.4 Total Internal Reflection and Fiber Optics 717

Insight: 22.3 Fiber Optics: Medical Applications 720

22.5 Dispersion 721

Insight: 22.4 The Rainbow 722

Chapter Review 723 Exercises 724

 

23 Mirrors and Lenses 729

23.1 Plane Mirrors 730

23.2 Spherical Mirrors 732

Insight: 23.1 It’s All Done with Mirrors 733

Learn by Drawing: A Mirror Ray Diagram (see Example 23.2) 734

23.3 Lenses 740

Learn by Drawing: A Lens Ray Diagram (see Example 23.5) 743

Insight: 23.2 Fresnel Lenses 748

23.4 The Lens Maker’s Equation 750

*23.5 Lens Aberrations 752

Chapter Review 753 Exercises 754

 

24 Physical Optics: The Wave Nature of Light 760

24.1 Young’s Double-Slit Experiment 761

24.2 Thin-Film Interference 764

Insight: 24.1 Nonreflecting Lenses 768

24.3 Diffraction 768

24.4 Polarization 775

Learn by Drawing: Three Polarizers (see Integrated Example 24.6.) 778

*24.5 Atmospheric Scattering of Light 782

Insight: 24.2 LCDs and Polarized Light 783

Insight: 24.3 Optical Biopsy 785

Chapter Review 785 Exercises 786

 

25 Vision and Optical Instruments 792

25.1 The Human Eye 793

Insight: 25.1 Cornea “Orthodontics” and Surgery 797

25.2 Microscopes 799

25.3 Telescopes 803

25.4 Diffraction and Resolution 807

Insight: 25.2 Telescopes Using Nonvisible Radiation 808

*25.5 Color 810

Chapter Review 813 Exercises 814

 

26 Relativity 819

26.1 Classical Relativity and the Michelson—Morley Experiment 820

26.2 The Postulates of Special Relativity and the Relativity of Simultaneity 822

26.3 The Relativity of Length and Time: Time Dilation and Length Contraction 825

26.4 Relativistic Kinetic Energy, Momentum, Total Energy, and Mass—Energy Equivalence 833

26.5 The General Theory of Relativity 837

Insight: 26.1 Relativity in Everyday Living 838

*26.6 Relativistic Velocity Addition 841

Insight: 26.2 Black Holes, Gravitational Waves, and LIGO 842

Chapter Review 844 Exercises 845

 

27 Quantum Physics 851

27.1 Quantization: Planck’s Hypothesis 852

27.2 Quanta of Light: Photons and the Photoelectric Effect 854

Learn by Drawing: The Photoelectric Effect and Energy Conservation 856

27.3 Quantum “Particles”: The Compton Effect 858

27.4 The Bohr Theory of the Hydrogen Atom 860

27.5 A Quantum Success: The Laser 866

Insight: 27.1 CD and DVD Systems 869

Insight: 27.2 Lasers in Modern Medicine 870

Chapter Review 871 Exercises 873

 

28 Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Physics 877

28.1 Matter Waves: The de Broglie Hypothesis 878

28.2 The Schrödinger Wave Equation 881

Insight: 28.1 The Electron Microscope 883

Insight: 28.2 The Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) 884

28.3 Atomic Quantum Numbers and the Periodic Table 885

Insight: 28.3 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 888

28.4 The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle 894

28.5 Particles and Antiparticles 896

Chapter Review 897 Exercises 898

 

29 The Nucleus 902

29.1 Nuclear Structure and the Nuclear Force 903

29.2 Radioactivity 906

29.3 Decay Rate and Half-Life 911

29.4 Nuclear Stability and Binding Energy 917

29.5 Radiation Detection, Dosage, and Applications 922

Insight: 29.1 Biological and Medical Applications of Radiation 927

Chapter Review 929 Exercises 930

 

30 Nuclear Reactions and Elementary Particles 935

30.1 Nuclear Reactions 936

30.2 Nuclear Fission 939

30.3 Nuclear Fusion 944

30.4 Beta Decay and the Neutrino 946

30.5 Fundamental Forces and Exchange Particles 948

30.6 Elementary Particles 951

30.7 The Quark Model 953

30.8 Force Unification Theories, the Standard Model, and the Early Universe 954

Chapter Review 956 Exercises 957

 

APPENDIX I Mathematical Review (with Examples) for College Physics A-1

APPENDIX II Kinetic Theory of Gases A-5

APPENDIX III Planetary Data A-6

APPENDIX IV Alphabetical Listing of the Chemical Elements A-7

APPENDIX V Properties of Selected Isotopes A-7

Answers to Follow-Up Exercises A-10

Answers to Odd-Numbered Exercises A-18

Photo Credits P-1

Index I-1

 

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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

We continue to believe that there are two goals any introductory physics course must accomplish, regardless of the approach, emphasis, or pedagogical techniques: (1) to impart an understanding of the basic physics principles and (2) to enable students to solve a variety of reasonable problems in topics presented in the text material.

These goals are linked. An understanding of physical principles is of limited use if it does not enable students to solve problems. Physics is a problem-solving science— and in the real world, students will be evaluated on their ability to produce correct answers on final exams or on the MCAT. Yet learning to solve problems by rote is not the same thing as learning physics. Knowing and doing— insight and skill— must go hand in hand.

Any deficiency in meeting the first goal is likely to be obvious. Test scores quickly get the attention of both test takers and test graders. Low grades demoralize instructors while discouraging students who, understandably, conclude that physics is "too hard" for any but the phenomenally gifted. Deficiencies in meeting the second goal tend to be more subtle. Research in physics education has shown that a surprising number of students who learn to solve typical problems well enough to pass examinations do so without ever arriving at a real understanding of the most elementary physical concepts. Such students often get high marks on exams, yet when asked to answer simple, qualitative questions designed to test their grasp of basic principles, they betray a surprising lack of insight. Simply put, they can solve quantitative problems and get the right answer,butthey do not know why it is right.

Achieving Our Goals— Features of the Fourth Edition

Most of the specific features of College Physics can be understood in light of these goals.

Conceptual Basis. We believe that giving students a secure grasp of physical principles will almost invariably enhance their problem-solving abilities. Central to this belief is an approach to the development of problem-solving skills that stresses the understanding of basic concepts, rather than the mechanical and rote use of formulas, as the essential foundation. Throughout the writing of College Physics, we have organized discussions and incorporated pedagogical tools to ensure that conceptual insight drives the development of practical skills.

Concise Coverage. To maintain a sharp focus on essential concepts, a book should emphasize the basics and minimize superfluous material. Topics of marginal interest have been avoided, as have those that present formal or mathematical difficulties for students. Similarly, we have not wasted space deriving relationships when they shed no additional light on the principle involved. It is usually more important for students in a course such as this to understand what a relationship means and how it can be used rather than the mathematical or analytical techniques employed to derive it.

Applications. College Physics has always been known for the strong mix of applications related to technology, science, architecture, medicine, and everyday life in its Insight boxes and text narrative. While the Fourth Edition continues to have a wider range of applications than do most texts, we have also increased the number of biological applications in recognition of the high percentage of pre-med and allied health majors who take this course. Some examples are the new Insight boxes Human Body Temperature, Electric Potential and Nerve Signal Transmission, and Magnetism in Nature. Overall, one-third of our Insight boxes are new. The Fourth Edition also contains many new applications within the text narrative and has an increased emphasis on real-world and applied topics in the worked Examples and end-of-chapter Exercises. A list of the most important applications with page references is found on p. xiii.

Visualization: "Learn by Drawing." visualization is one of the most important problemsolving tools in physics. In many cases, if students can make a sketch of a problem, they can solve it. "Learn by Drawing" features offer students specific help on making certain types of sketches,and graphs that will provide key insights into a variety of physical situations. The Fourth Edition has three new Learn by Drawing features, on the following topics: Cartesian coordinates and one dimensional motion, oscillation in a parabolic potential well, and the independence of potential difference on reference point.

Demonstrations. Photo sequences of 16 physics demonstrations bring physical principles to life, helping students understand that the information and equations on the page describe real-world phenomena.

Integrated Learning Objectives. Specific learning objectives, located at the beginning of each chapter section, help students structure their reading and facilitate review.

Suggested Problem-Solving Procedure. An extensive section (Section 1.7) provides a framework for thinking about problem solving. This section includes:

  • An overview of problem-solving strategies;
  • A seven-step procedure that is general enough to apply to most problems in physics but is easily used in specific situations;
  • Three Examples that illustrate the problemsolving process, showing how the general procedure is applied in practice.
Problem-Solving Strategies and Hints. The initial treatment of problem solving is followed up throughout College Physics with an abundance of suggestions, tips, cautions, shortcuts, and useful techiques for solving specific kinds of problems. These strategies and hints help students apply general principles to specific contexts as well as avoid common pitfalls and misunderstandings.

Conceptual Examples. College Physics was among the first physics text to include examples that are conceptual in nature in addition to quantitative ones. Our Conceptual Examples ask students to think about a physical situation and choose the correct prediction on the basis of an understanding of relevant principles. The discussion that follows (Reasoning and Answer) explains clearly how the correct answer can be identified as well as why the other answers are wrong.

More Explanation in Examples. Too many solutions to worked examples in other texts rely on formulas such as "From Eq. 6.7 we have. . . ." We have tried to make the solutions to in-text Examples as clear, patient, and detailed as possible. The aim is not merely to show students which equations to use but to explain the strategy being employed and the role of each step in the overall plan. Students are encouraged to learn the "why" of each step along with the "how." This technique will make it easier for students to apply the demonstrated techniques to other problems that are not identical in structure.

Thinking It Through. New to the Fourth Edition, every worked Example now includes a "Thinking It Through" section after the problem statement and before the Solution to focus students on the critical thinking and analysis they should do before beginning to use equations.

Follow-up Exercises. Follow-up Exercises at the end of each Conceptual Example and each regular worked Example further reinforce the importance of conceptual understanding and offer additional practice. (Answers to Follow-up Exercises are given at the back of the book.)

Chapter Review. Each Chapter Review is made up of three parts:

  1. Important Terms: A listing, with page references, of the key terms introduced in the chapter that students should be able to define and explain.
  2. Important Concepts: A summary of the key principles of each chapter.
  3. Important Equations: A listing, cross-referenced to the equations in the chapter, of the major laws and mathematical relationships introduced. Specific applicability and limiting conditions are clearly stated for each expression.
Exercises. Each chapter ends with a wealth of Exercises, organized by chapter section and ranked by general level of difficulty. In addition, the Exercises offer the following special features to help students refine both their conceptual understanding and their problem-solving skills:
  • Integration of Conceptual and Quantitative Exercises. To help break down the artificial and ultimately counterproductive barrier between conceptual questions and quantitative problems, we do not distinguish between these categories in the end-of-chapter Exercises. Instead, each section begins with a series of multiple-choice and short-answer questions that provide content review, test conceptual understanding, and ask students to reason from principles. The aim is to show students that the same kind of conceptual insight is required regardless of whether the desired answer involves words, equations, or numbers. The conceptual or "thought" questions are marked by a bold TQ in the Annotated Instructor's Edition of the text for easy reference when assigning questions. Unlike most other texts, College Physics offers short answers to all odd-numbered conceptual questions (as well as to all odd-numbered quantitative problems) in the back of the text so that students can check their understanding. About 35% of all Thought Questions and Exercises in the Fourth Edition are new.
  • Interactive Exercises. New to the Fourth Edition, many of the end-of-chapter Exercises are keyed to simulations on Prentice Hall's multimedia study guide, the Interactive Journey through Physics. Exercises that have a corresponding simulation are indicated with a CD-ROM icon. The College Physics Media Pack (ISBN 0-13-085346-1), a specially discounted package consisting of the text and Interactive Journey through Physics CD-ROM, includes a crossreference/location guide to allow you to match Exercise numbers to corresponding simulations.
  • Paired and Trio Exercises. Most numbered sections include at least one set of paired Exercises and, new to the Fourth Edition, one set of trio Exercises, that deal with similar situations. The first problem in a pair or trio is solved in the Study Guide; the second problem, exploring a similar situation, has only an answer at the back of the book, thereby encouraging students to work out the problem on their own. The third problem in a trio is answered in the Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual

    .

  • Additional Exercises. Each chapter includes a supplemental section of Additional Exercises drawn from all sections of the chapter to ensure that students can synthesize concepts.
The Absolutely Zero Tolerance for Errors Club (The AZTECs). This team approach to accuracy checking worked quite well in the third edition, so we did it again. Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the author of our Instructor's Solutions Manual, headed the AZTEC team and was supported by the text authors and two additional accuracy checkers, Bill McCorkle of West Liberty State University and Dave Curott of the University of North Alabama. Each member of the team individually and independently worked all end-of-chapter Exercises. The results were then collected, and any discrepancies were resolved by a "team" discussion. All data in the chapters, as well as the answers at the back of the book, were checked and rechecked in first and second page proofs. In addition, two other physics teachers— J. Erik Hendrickson and K. W. Nicholson— read all first pages in detail, checking for errors in the chapter narrative and text art. Although it is probably not humanly possible to produce a physics text with absolutely no errors, that was our goal; we worked very hard to make the book as error-free as we could.

New Multimedia Explorations of Physics

New to the Fourth Edition are a state-of-the art Website and a CD-ROM media package.

Companion Website. Our Website (at http://www.prenhall.com/wilson), with contributions from leaders in physics education research, provides students with a variety of interactive explorations of each chapter's topics, easily accommodating differences in learning styles. Student tools include Warm-Ups, Puzzles, and "What Is Physics Good For?" applications by Gregor Novak and Andy Gavrin (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis); award-winning Java-based Physlet problems by Wolfgang Christian (Davidson College); algorithmically generated numerical Practice Problems, multiple-choice Practice Questions, online Destinations, and Net Search key words by Carl Adler (East Carolina University); Ranking Task Exercises edited by Tom O'Kuma (Lee College), David Maloney (Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne) and Curtis Hieggelke (Joliet Junior College); downloadable PDF files for a Mechanics Problem-Solving Workbook by Dan Smith (South Carolina State University); and MCAT Questions by Glen Terrell (University of Texas at Arlington) and from ARCO's MCAT Supercourse. Using the Preferences module at the opening of the site or the tool in the "Results reporter" part of each module, students can, at a professor's request, have the results of their work on the Companion Website e-mailed to the professor or teaching assistant. Instructor tools include on-line grading capabilities and a Syllabus Manager. See pp. xxviii-xxiv for further information about the modules in this site.

Media Pack for College Physics, Fourth Edition (0-13-085346-1). College Physics, Fourth Edition can be purchased in a specially discounted package called the Media Pack, which includes the student text, the dual-platform Interactive Journey through Physics (IJTP) CDROM by Cindy Schwarz (Vassar College) and Logal, Inc., Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide, 1999 by Andrew Stull, and a cross-reference/location guide to correlate Exercises in the text marked with a CD-ROM icon and corresponding simulations on the IJTP CD-ROM. This CDROM is a multimedia study guide for physics, with simulations, animations, videos, hyperlinked topic reviews, MCAT review questions and problems (including Ranking Task Exercises, contextrich problems, and video problems) for mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and light and optics. It also includes a built-in scientific calculator with a library of key physics constants, a glossary, and pertinent tables and equations. See pp. xxx-xxxi for a complete description of the types of materials on the IJTP CD-ROM.

Additional Supplements

The pedagogical value of College Physics is enhanced by a variety of supplements developed to address the needs of both students and instructors.

For the Instructor

Annotated Instructor's Edition (0-13-084167-6). The margins of the Annotated Instructor's Edition (AIE) contain an abundance of suggestions for classroom demonstrations and activities, along with teaching tips (points to emphasize, discussion suggestions, and common misunderstandings to avoid). In addition, the AIE contains:

  • Icons that identify each illustration reproduced as a transparency in the Transparency Pack.
  • Answers to end-of-chapter Exercises (following each Exercise).
  • References to applicable video demonstrations from the Physics You Can See videotape.

Instructor's Solutions Manual (0-13-084168-4). Prepared by Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the Instructor's Solutions Manual supplies answers with complete, worked-out solutions to all end-of-chapter Exercises. Each solution has been checked for accuracy by a minimum of five instructors. This manual is also available electronically on both Windows and Macintosh platforms.

Test Item File (0-13-084160-9). Fully revised by Dave Curott of the University of North Alabama, the Test Item File now offers more than 2300 questions— approximately 30% of them new to this edition— and includes several new conceptual questions per chapter. The questions are now organized and referenced by type and by section.

Prentice Hall Custom Test (Windows: 0-13-084171-4; Macintosh: 0-13084172-2). Based on the powerful testing technology developed by Engineering Software Associates, Inc. (ESA), the Prentice Hall Custom Test allows instructors to create and tailor exams to their own needs. With the On-line Testing Program, exams can also be administered on-line and data can then be automatically transferred for evaluation. A comprehensive desk reference guide is included, along with on-line assistance.

Transparency Pack (0-13-084175-7). The Transparency Pack contains more than 300 full-color acetates of text illustrations useful for class lectures. It is available upon adoption of the text.

Physics You Can See Video Demonstrations (0-205-12393-7). Each segment, 25 minutes long, demonstrates a classical physics experiment. Eleven segments are included, such as "Coin & Feather" (acceleration due to gravity), "Monkey & Gun" (rate of vertical free fall), "Swivel Hips" (force pairs), and "Collapse a Can" (atmospheric pressure).

Presentation Manager CD-ROM (0-13-084174-9). This new CD-ROM contains all the text art and videos from the Physics You Can See videotape as well as additional lab and demonstration videos and animations from the Interactive Journey through Physics CD-ROM, which is also available from Prentice Hall (see below).

Just-in-Time Teaching: Blending Active Learning with Web Technology (013-085034-9). Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an exciting new teaching and learning methodology designed to engage students. Using feedback from pre-class Web assignments, instructors can adjust classroom lessons so that students receive rapid response to the specific questions and problems they are having— instead of more generic lectures that may or may not address topics with which students actually need help. Many teachers have found that this process makes students become active and interested learners. In this resource book for educators, authors Gregor Novak (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis), Evelyn Patterson (United States Air Force Academy), Andrew Gavrin (Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis), and Wolfgang Christian (Davidson College) more fully explain what Just-in-Time Teaching is, its underlying goals and philosophies, and how to implement it. They also provide an extensive section of tested resource materials that can be used in introductory physics courses with the JiTT approach.

For the Student

Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual (0-13-084365-2). Significantly revised by Bo Lou of Ferris State University, the Student Study Guide and Solutions Manual presents chapter-by chapter reviews, chapter summaries, key terms, additional worked problems, and solutions to selected problems.

The New York Times "Themes of the Times" Program. This innovative program, made possible through an exclusive partnership between Prentice Hall and The New York Times, brings current and relevant applications into the classroom. Through this program, adopters of College Physics, Fourth Edition are eligible to receive our free, unique "mini-newspapers," which bring together a collection of the latest and best physics articles from the highly respected pages of The New York Times. They are updated annually and are free to qualified adopters up to the quantity of texts purchased. Contact your local representative for ordering.

MCAT Physics Study Guide (0-13-627951-1). This study resource by Joseph Boone of California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo references all of the physics topics on the MCAT to the appropriate sections in the text. Since most MCAT questions require more thought and reasoning than simply plugging numbers into an equation, this study guide is designed to refresh students' memory about the topics they've covered in class. Additional review, practice problems, and review questions are included.

Science on the Internet: A Student's Guide, 1999 (0-13-021308-X). This guide helps students gain a greater understanding of the Internet and the ways in which they can access information on the Web relating to their study of physics.

Other Related Multimedia Materials

Interactive Physics II Player Workbook (Windows: 0-13-667312-0; Macintosh: 0-13-477670-4). Written by Cindy Schwarz of Vassar College, this highly interactive workbook/software package contains simulation projects of varying difficulty. Each includes a physics review, simulation details, hints, an explanation of results, math help, and a self-test.

Interactive journey through Physics CD-ROM (0-13-254103-3). This highly interactive CD-ROM can be used as a stand-alone supplement for any introductory physics course or as a general reference tool. Through simulation, animation, video, and interactive problem solving, students can visualize difficult physics concepts in ways not available through the traditional lecture, lab, and text. The innovative concept checks and extension exercises within the simulations facilitate the reinforcement of important physical concepts. The content of this CDROM is organized according to the main topics in physics— mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and light and optics. The numerous analysis tools are easily navigated through a userfriendly interface. See the previous description under Media Pack and pp. xxx-xxxi for more detail about the IJTP CD-ROM, and see ordering information for the discounted price when purchased with College Physics, Fourth Edition, in the Media Pack.

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