Collier, Coleridge, and Shakespeare: A Review

Collier, Coleridge, and Shakespeare: A Review

by Andrew Edmund Brae
     
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. COMPARISONS. The reader of these lectures, who retains some recollection of Coleridge's other productions, will seek in vain for that vivid and peculiar… See more details below

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. COMPARISONS. The reader of these lectures, who retains some recollection of Coleridge's other productions, will seek in vain for that vivid and peculiar phraseology he has been accustomed to associate with them. Old familiar things, it is true, he will meet with in abundance—entire sentences and passages to which he will have no difficulty in assigning homes amongst the literary reliquiso of Coleridge ; but they are without fitness or cohesion. They seem like disbanded vagabonds without a leader, or rather like the caput mortuum of used up tea leaves to which all the re-roasting and refriz- zling in the world will fail to restore the old essential spirit. Coleridge himself, assuming that it is himself, seems to have been- conscious of this when, in the sixth of these lectures, page 32, he bespeaks the indulgence of his hearers :— " It is true that my matter may not be so accurately arranged j it may not dovetail and fit at all times as nicely as could be wished ; but you shall have my thoughts warm from my heart, and fresh from my understanding; you shall have the whole skeleton, although the bones may not be put together with the utmost anatomical skill." Quite true ! the matter does not dovetail, it resembles rubble- work rather ; where old materials are shovelled in at random, and left to find places as they can in the midst of vapid and worthless rubbish. The first. comparison shall be a contrast, between the style of criticism attributed to Coleridge in theselecturesand that known and acknowledged to be his by publication with his works. And this comparison is rendered necessary by the assumption of Mr. Collier (alluded to in the preceding chapter) that the composition of these lectures is too good to be the production of any meaner genius than ...

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940024345696
Publisher:
Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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