Colonial Effects: The Making of National Identity in Jordan / Edition 1

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Overview

Colonial Effects analyzes the creation and definition of modern Jordanian identity. Massad studies two key institutions— the law and the military—and uses them to create an original and precise analysis of the development of Jordanian national identity in the postcolonial period.

Joseph A. Massad engages recent scholarly debates on nationalism and richly fulfills the analytical promise of Michel Foucault's insight that modern institutions and their power to have productive, not merely repressive or coercive, capacities — though Massad also stresses their continued repressive function.

His argument is advanced by a consideration of evidence, including images produced by state tourist agencies aimed at attracting Western visitors, the changing and precarious position of women in the newly constructed national space, and such practices as soccer games, music, songs, food, clothing, and shifting accents and dialects.

Columbia University Press

Winner of the 1998 Malcolm Kerr Dissertation Award from the Middle East Studies Association

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
Massad adopts an innovative approach by examining the effects of juridical and military institutions on the shaping of Jordan's national culture... [He] devotes very tangible attention to Bedouins, women, and Palestinians and their incorporation into the invented national culture of Jordan... [in a] sophisticated analysis.
Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies - Betty S. Anderson
By focusing on the actions and motivations of the British Colonial administrators — in codifying laws and defining the national culture — Massad provides an excellent analysis of state construction in the colonial realm. For this reason, his work is poised for use by scholars and teachers in a number of fields far beyond Jordanian and Middle Eastern studies... Massad beautifully expands the breadth of Jordanian studies by examining issues thus far neglected in all studies of the country... In a classroom setting... the thematic organizational structure means that students do not have to know very much about Jordanian history to be able to understand the main points. The chapters on the role of gender, law, and the military in nationalist construction can be read easily as case studies of national identity throughout the region and the world. A search of any Web engine will show how very popular this book has become for a range of disciplines and class types... As many scholars and teachers have discovered already, the book provides questions and answers about nationalism that few writers have posed before.
Journal of Palestine Studies - Mary C. Wilson
Massad offers a theoretically informed and highly interesting analysis of the construction of national identity in Jordan... [ Colonial Effects] is full of fascinating information and an analysis of the colonial and postcolonial state's production of national identity that should invigorate the field.
Middle East Journal - Laurie Brand
This is an important book.... It is against the background of Massad's study that one will have to judge... current and forthcoming works.
American Historical Review - Philip S. Khoury
Historians interested in the emergence of national identities in other colonial and postcolonial countries and societies would do well to examine Massad's book. Reading it will require considerable concentration and patience, but the rewards should be substantial.
British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
Massad, puts forward a sophisticated constitutive analysis of Jordan's 'national' identity, singling out the different turns and twists in the formation of the 'Jordanian' character and make-up.
International Journal of Middle East Studies
Impressive... meticulously documented throughout.
Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies
By focusing on the actions and motivations of the British Colonial administrators — in codifying laws and defining the national culture — Massad provides an excellent analysis of state construction in the colonial realm. For this reason, his work is poised for use by scholars and teachers in a number of fields far beyond Jordanian and Middle Eastern studies... Massad beautifully expands the breadth of Jordanian studies by examining issues thus far neglected in all studies of the country... In a classroom setting... the thematic organizational structure means that students do not have to know very much about Jordanian history to be able to understand the main points. The chapters on the role of gender, law, and the military in nationalist construction can be read easily as case studies of national identity throughout the region and the world. A search of any Web engine will show how very popular this book has become for a range of disciplines and class types... As many scholars and teachers have discovered already, the book provides questions and answers about nationalism that few writers have posed before.

— Betty S. Anderson

Jouvert: A Journal of Postcolonial Studies
[P]ainstakingly researched... Massad's Colonial Effects is an enlightening exploration of national identity construction that... can illuminate the process of identity creation not only in Jordan, but in many other postcolonial nations as well.
Al-Jazeera
The thesis of this important and profound book transcends the Jordanian case and reaches into the heart of the debate about the formation of national identities, the idea of the nation, and the effect of the colonial context in shaping identities and nationalities. The [analytic and historical] benefits that this book contributes surpass those provided by many other books on the topic, and it will surely occupy a central place in the literature about the modern history of Jordan.
Al-Hayat
Massad's book will occupy an important place in the literature on the modern history of Jordan, not only due to its unique and pioneering topic, but also due to its remarkably encyclopedic range. It is a book that engages the fields of politics, history, sociology, as well as popular culture... This is a great and distinguished book.
Edward Said
A work of genuine brilliance, as much for its searing insights into Jordanian history and culture as for its extraordinary mastery of the vast material it deploys. It is rare to encounter a pathbreaking book: this is certainly one.
Al-Jazeera (translated from the Arabic)
The thesis of this important and profound book transcends the Jordanian case and reaches into the heart of the debate about the formation of national identities, the idea of the nation, and the effect of the colonial context in shaping identities and nationalities. The [analytic and historical] benefits that this book contributes surpass those provided by many other books on the topic, and it will surely occupy a central place in the literature about the modern history of Jordan.
Foreign Affairs
Massad offers not the usual political history but a study of legal changes and the use of the military for nation-building.
Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies

By focusing on the actions and motivations of the British Colonial administrators -- in codifying laws and defining the national culture -- Massad provides an excellent analysis of state construction in the colonial realm. For this reason, his work is poised for use by scholars and teachers in a number of fields far beyond Jordanian and Middle Eastern studies... Massad beautifully expands the breadth of Jordanian studies by examining issues thus far neglected in all studies of the country... In a classroom setting... the thematic organizational structure means that students do not have to know very much about Jordanian history to be able to understand the main points. The chapters on the role of gender, law, and the military in nationalist construction can be read easily as case studies of national identity throughout the region and the world. A search of any Web engine will show how very popular this book has become for a range of disciplines and class types... As many scholars and teachers have discovered already, the book provides questions and answers about nationalism that few writers have posed before.

— Betty S. Anderson

Journal of Palestine Studies
Massad offers a theoretically informed and highly interesting analysis of the construction of national identity in Jordan... [ Colonial Effects] is full of fascinating information and an analysis of the colonial and postcolonial state's production of national identity that should invigorate the field.

— Mary C. Wilson

Choice

Massad adopts an innovative approach by examining the effects of juridical and military institutions on the shaping of Jordan's national culture... [He] devotes very tangible attention to Bedouins, women, and Palestinians and their incorporation into the invented national culture of Jordan... [in a] sophisticated analysis.

Al-Hayat (translated from the Arabic)
Massad's book will occupy an important place in the literature on the modern history of Jordan, not only due to its unique and pioneering topic, but also due to its remarkably encyclopedic range. It is a book that engages the fields of politics, history, sociology, as well as popular culture... This is a great and distinguished book.
Middle East Journal
This is an important book.... It is against the background of Massad's study that one will have to judge... current and forthcoming works.

— Laurie Brand

American Historical Review
Historians interested in the emergence of national identities in other colonial and postcolonial countries and societies would do well to examine Massad's book. Reading it will require considerable concentration and patience, but the rewards should be substantial.

— Philip S. Khoury

Electronic Journal of Middle East Studies
This is a potent, suggestive, and original work, based on extensive research including archival material and newspapers. It is a major contribution to the literature on Jordanian nationalism, anticolonial nationalism, and the wider field of postcolonial studies. It will be widely read and stir important debates.
Arab Studies Journal
Massad's book is informative, original, and interesting.... Ultimately, this book is a pleasure. It is an innovative approach to the creation of Jordanian national identity and a much-needed and welcome addition to the scholarship on Jordanian national identity.
Al-Jadid
[I]n his provocative book... Massad eruditely examines and reconstructs the creation and evolution of the Jordanian nation... This insightful book will serve to provide readers with an immeasurable understanding and a methodology for exploring the complexities of colonialism and postcolonial national movements.
Jouvert: A Journal of Postcolonial Studies
[P]ainstakingly researched... Massad's Colonial Effects is an enlightening exploration of national identity construction that... can illuminate the process of identity creation not only in Jordan, but in many other postcolonial nations as well.
Radical History Review
Massad chart[s] new ground methodologically [and] his substantive arguments are equally innovative... he uses new conceptual tools for interpreting the construction of colonial and postcolonial national identity... Always attuned to the political implications of culture, Massad shows how [cultural] inventions have been politically expedient, aimed at bolstering the unity of the nation in the face of real social cleavages... Colonial Effects is an ambitious book. It is sometimes hard to categorize because of the author's apparent comfort in different disciplines (political theory, diplomatic history, and cultural studies toname a few) and his use of different modes of argumentation (from the purely descriptive to the highly abstract)... [The book] illuminate[s] the complex negotiations between colonizer and colonized in an understudied period of mandate rule in the Middle East. In addition, [it] constitute[s] part of a small but growing group of works demonstrating the usefulness ofMiddle Eastern history and politics for theorizing modern processes like the gendered construction of citizenship and national identity. It is to be hoped that scholars of Europe in particular (who have paid little attention to the Middle East) will appreciate [its] insights.
Middle East Quarterly
Massad has done a thorough job of mastering the source material.
Edward Said
Joseph Massad's Colonial Effects is a work of genuine brilliance, as much for its searing insights into Jordanian history and culture as for its extraordinary mastery of the vast material it deploys. It is rare to encounter a pathbreaking book: this is certainly one.
Timothy Mitchell
Massad asks how a national identity could emerge in a country established, ruled, and peopled to a significant extent by outsiders. His subtle analysis of the ways cultural politics and coercive power interact is an original and important contribution to the political theory of nationalism.
Rashid Khalidi
Well written and tightly argued. . . . One of the best of the new crop of studies that deal with the evolution of national identity in the Middle East.
Choice
Innovative.
Foreign Affairs
Massad offers not the usual political history but a study of legal changes and the use of the military for nation-building.
Sally Bland
Impressive...This book is a must for anyone wanting a thought-provoking, comprehensive account of Jordan's history that goes behind the scenes of showy events to reveal the real social processes that shape people's lives. It is an important contribution to the study of nationalism, whether Arab nationalism, Jordanian nationalism, or nationalism in general.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231123235
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 9/4/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 276
  • Sales rank: 961,470
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Joseph A. Massad is assistant professor of modern Arab politics and intellectual history in the Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. He won the Malcolm Kerr Dissertation Award for this work from the Middle East Studies Association.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

IntroductionLaw, Military, and DisciplineTradition and ModernityHistorical MomentsPart I: Codifying the Nation: Law and the Articulation of National Identity in Jordan The Prehistory of Juridical PostcolonialityNational TimeNational SpaceNational Territory and PaternityNationalizing Non-NationalsLosing Nationality: The Law Giveth and the Law Taketh AwayWomen and ChildrenPart II: Different Spaces as Different Times: Law and Geography in Jordanian Nationalism Different Species of Citizens: Women and BedouinsBedouins and National CitizenshipNationalist Tribalism or Tribalist Nationalism: The DebateJordanian Culture in an International FrameWomen Between the Public and Private SpheresWomen in PublicWomen and PoliticsPart III: Cultural Syncretism or Colonial Mimic Men: Jordan's Bedouins and the Military Basis of National Identity The Bedouin ChoiceCultural Imperialism and DisciplineCultural Cross-Dressing as EpistemologyImperialism as EducatorMasculinity, Culture, and WomenTransforming the BedouinsPersuasion, Education, and SurveillancePart IV: Nationalizing the Military: Colonial Legacy as National Heritage Anticolonial Nationalism and the ArmyKing Husayn and the Nationalist OfficersClash of the Titans: Glubb Pasha and the Uneasy King"Arabizing" the Jordanian ArmyThe Palace Coup and the End of an EraPalace Repression and the Forgiving KingPalestinians and the MilitaryThreatening the Nation's Masculinity and Religious "Tradition"The Military and the New JordanColonial or National LegacyPart V: The Nation as an Elastic Entity: The Expansion and Contraction of Jordan Expanding the Nation: The Road to AnnexationThe Jericho ConferenceThe New JordanPalestinians and the West BankCompeting Representatives: The PLO and JordanToward Civil WarA New Nationalist EraClothes, Accents, and Football: Asserting Post — Civil War JordaniannessContracting the Nation: The Road to "The Severing of Ties"Who Is Jordanian? Concluding Remarks

Columbia University Press

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