Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century by John Hope Franklin, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century

Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century

by John Hope Franklin
     
 

Nearly twenty years after his book Racial Equality in America, Franklin addressed the issue of racial inequality. In the Paul Anthony Brick Lectures given at the University of Missouri-Columbia, just one day after the "not guilty" verdict was returned in the trial of Los Angeles police officers for the beating of Rodney King, Franklin delivered a

Overview


Nearly twenty years after his book Racial Equality in America, Franklin addressed the issue of racial inequality. In the Paul Anthony Brick Lectures given at the University of Missouri-Columbia, just one day after the "not guilty" verdict was returned in the trial of Los Angeles police officers for the beating of Rodney King, Franklin delivered a piercing depiction of the color line that persists in America. A scathing portrait of how discrimination has been allowed to flourish and a poignantly despairing prognosis for its end, The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century is a perfect companion to the earlier volume. Together these books powerfully define and describe the long-held, but still unrealized, goal of equal rights for all Americans.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Stronger on historical analysis than on in-depth assessments of current politics, this series of three lectures delivered in April 1992 at the University of Missouri examines America's tragic preoccupation with race. Echoing W.E.B. Du Bois's 1903 assertion that the problem of the 20th century ``is the problem of the color line,'' historian Franklin ( From Slavery to Freedom ) argues that this will be the problem of the 21st century as well. He demonstrates how the Reagan administration ``encouraged policies and measures that denied equal opportunity and equal treatment''; traces such steps toward progress as school desegregation; and explains how opponents of affirmative action frequently base their attacks on false assumptions (``A color-blind society does not exist in the United States and has never existed,'' the author declares). Although his necessarily brief remarks do not address such complicating factors as tensions between minority groups, class divisions and black separatism, his cogent observations will spur further discussion. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Echoing the U.S. intellectual W.E.B. Du Bois's prescient prediction about the 20th century, the eminent U.S. historian Franklin argues persuasively that the persistent, dismal reality of U.S. racial bias makes the problem of the color line the problem of the 21st century. Reviewing the sad national climate and undercurrent of resentment from Reconstruction to Reagan, Franklin reminds readers of America's lack of resolve to confront and conquer race-based economic and social inequities. The ugly race-blighted past threatens also to be the nation's future bane unless its people refuse to relive their mistakes, he warns. The three essays making up this powerful little book were originally delivered as the 1992 Paul Anthony Brick Lectures at the University of Missouri, and anyone interested in understanding or improving America needs to read them. Highly recommended.-- Thomas J. Davis, Univ. at Buffalo, N.Y.
Angus Trimnell
Franklin, a highly distinguished academician and historian, honored and experienced in public service, delivered the three lectures that constitute this brief work in 1992 at the University of Missouri. Recalling W. E. B. DuBois' assertion early in the 1900s that the problem of the century was "the problem of the color line," Franklin details his case that this same claim can be made for the upcoming century. Focusing on the political system, he thoughtfully considers the gains made in civil rights in the last 30 years, but he gives the lie to recent claims by the Far Right (most visibly, Ronald Reagan) that we now have a color-blind society and have no need for race-based programs. He points out how this false claim has provided politicians a context for a renewal of racist politics, quota-baiting, and the like. This is a wake-up call, if the Rodney King verdict and resulting riots weren't enough, to those who feel we don't need to address questions of race. We need to address these questions now more than ever. This clear, informative study, though of no service as a broad guide to American racial politics, deserves a place in established political and African American studies collections.
Booknews
Originating as three lectures delivered at the U. of Missouri in April 1992 (just one day after the "not guilty" verdict was returned in the trial of Los Angeles police officers in the beating of Rodney King), distinguished historian Franklin reflects on the most tragic and persistent social problem in American history--racism. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher

"Echoing W.E.B. Du Bois's 1903 assertion that the problem of the 20th century 'is the problem of the color line,' historian Franklin . . . argues that this will be the problem of the 21st century as well. . . . his cogent observations will spur further discussion."--Publishers Weekly

"Anyone interested in understanding or improving America needs to read this powerful little book. Highest recommendation."--Library Journal

"It gives the non-historian, in accessible prose, the advantage of his more than 50 years of scholarship on a subject that many Americans would just as soon forget. If the harsh truth about America's racial history is ever going to be digested, unassuming works such as this one will surely play a part."--The St. Petersburg Florida Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780826208941
Publisher:
University of Missouri Press
Publication date:
02/01/1993
Series:
The Paul Anthony Brick Lectures
Pages:
104

Meet the Author

John Hope Franklin is the author of many books, including From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans and the highly acclaimed biography George Washington Williams. With more than ninety honorary degrees and dozens of other awards and honors, Franklin is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History and, from 1985 to 1992, was Professor of Legal History in the Law School at Duke University.

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