Color Zoo
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Color Zoo

4.0 4
by Lois Ehlert
     
 

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Shapes and colors in your zoo, lots of things that you can do. Heads and ears, beaks and snouts, that's what animals are all about. I know animals and you do too; make some new ones for your zoo.

Overview

Shapes and colors in your zoo, lots of things that you can do. Heads and ears, beaks and snouts, that's what animals are all about. I know animals and you do too; make some new ones for your zoo.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
Ehlert has great talent for creating books that are deceptively simple, yet challenging and rewarding for young children. Color Zoo has been issued in a board book format. It features animals in a series of die-cut pages that reveal a progression of animal faces by changing shapes and colors. The book has three sets of die-cut pages that progress through a series of three animals and then a final page with all the shapes creating a pattern. A companion book is Color Farm.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-- This uniquely designed book features a series of cutouts stacked so that with each page turn, a layer is removed to reveal yet another picture. Each configuration is an animal: a tiger's face (a circle shape) and two ears disappear with a page turn to leave viewers with a square within which is a mouse. The mouse's square frame, removed, reveals a fox. There are three such series, and each ends with a small round-up of the shapes used so far. That's not all. On the reverse of the turned page is the shape cutout previously removed with the shape's printed name. While the tiger and lion are not easy to identify in their geometrically shaped components, children will readily name the seven others and will delight in identifying both animals and shapes. Boldly designed pages easily carry to the rear of the room during story hours, and brilliant juxtapositions of vibrant primary colors will make children's eyes tingle. --Susan Hepler, formerly at Windsor Public Library, Conn.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780694010677
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/28/1997
Pages:
26
Sales rank:
194,080
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.00(d)
Age Range:
1 - 2 Years

Meet the Author

Lois Ehlert is the Caldecott Honor winning author and illustrator of Color Zoo, as well as Color Farm, and Circus. She is also the illustrator of many other books including Crocodile Smile by Sarah Weeks, and A Pair of Socks by Stuart J. Murphy. She lives in Milwaukee, WI.

Lois Ehlert is the Caldecott Honor winning author and illustrator of Color Zoo, as well as Color Farm, and Circus. She is also the illustrator of many other books including Crocodile Smile by Sarah Weeks, and A Pair of Socks by Stuart J. Murphy. She lives in Milwaukee, WI.

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Color Zoo 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Shapes and colors in your zoo' is th eopening lin ein this book. Automatically the children will know what they're going to learn about. In the beginning, this book starts with a poetic introduction. Throughout the book it uses cut out shapes to show what makes different animals. This book would be great for hands on learners. 'Iknow animals and you do too, make some new ones for your zoo'. Ehlert, Lois. Color Zoo. Harper Collins Publishers, 1989.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Caldecott: The book, Color Zoo, is a good book for younger children that are learning shapes and colors. I did not find the book entertaining for myself, but a younger child I would like it. I thought it was neat how each shape made an animal. It was very short and did not teach very much or say very much. It was only about animals, colors, and shapes. Lois Ehlert grew up in a home where everyone seemed to be making something. As far back as she can remember, she was always putting things together, cutting, stitching, pasting, or pounding. The feel of the object she made was as important as the look. Her mother, a good seamstress, shared her fabric scraps with Lois and taught her to use her sewing machine when she was about eight years old. Lois¿ dad had a basement workshop, which supplied her with scrap lumber and nails. So she always had a ready supply of art materials, but not necessarily traditional ones like paper and paint. In fact, colored construction paper was pale in tone compared to my cloth scraps. (To this day she prefers to paint her own papers to create just the right color or texture.) She also did a lot of painting and drawing as she was growing up. But she didn't like drawing as much as cutting and pasting. Unless she used a lot of erasers (and she did) and kept changing the drawing, it never was exactly the way she wanted it. For instance, if she drew a face, she would never know whether the mouth would look better one inch closer to the nose unless she did the drawing over and over again. But if she cut out a mouth of paper, she could try it in different positions until she found the best one, then glue it down. Lois works in a studio in her home. She¿s always thought it's important to have a special area just for making art. Anyone of any age can make such a space, even if it's just a little corner in a room. When you go to this area it means you are ready to create something. She has a huge drawing board, near large windows, with cabinets and work surfaces on both sides. She keeps her marking pens and pencils, paints, and colored papers in the drawers of these cabinets. On top of the cabinets at the left she has jars full of brushes, pens, pencils, scissors, a tape dispenser, a rubber cement jug, a telephone (she can keep working while she talks on the phone), and a desk calendar. The desk calendar helps her keep track of speaking dates at schools and museums, and by the end of each week it is usually full of ink spots and paint splashes. If you are an artist or a writer like her, it sometimes is difficult to know just where ideas come from. That's a question people ask Lois all the time. Now that she is grown up she realizes that she writes and draws things she knows and cares about. For instance, she thinks that having a garden most of her life provided her with ideas for Growing Vegetable Soup, and the Nuts to You! story was inspired by a real event - a squirrel really did sneak into her house through the window. But she still don't know exactly where all her ideas come from. As you may have noticed, in most cases her writing complements her art. She works on writing for a while and then goes back to the art - back and forth, until she gets just the right balance. It seems to take her a long time to make a book, and it is difficult but enjoyable work. It looks so simple if you get it right! Lois thinks being creative is a part of a person's makeup. It's something she feels very lucky about. She has worked hard to make this gift as fine as she can make it, but she still thinks she was born with certain ideas and feelings just waiting to burst out! Color Zoo, is a book about animals, shapes, and colors. The author uses shapes to turn them into animals. Throughout the book the author shows you different animals and the shapes that go along with them. At the end of each section the shapes you learned are reviewed. At the end of the book all the shapes and colors are reviewed with pictures that go alo
Guest More than 1 year ago
My son is 3 years old, and he is very smart for his age. He already knew all the shapes and colors, we thought. We visit the library every Friday as a 'Mom and Me' day out. He chose the Color Zoo book because it's cover was very bright and attractive. He learned two new shapes, octagon and hexagon. He loved the book so much, that I ordered him one. I am even buying that for several Christmas gifts. This is the BEST color, shapes, and animals book I've ever seen. I thought that since he already knew all this that it would be boring to him, but he wanted to read the book all day long. He loves books, and doesn't have time for TV. Thanks to the author. We love COLOR ZOO.