Colour and the Shape

The Colour and the Shape

5.0 4
by Foo Fighters
     
 

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Taking a cue from the old Blondie marketing slogan, the sophomore effort from Dave Grohl's post-Nirvana band was their "The Foo Fighters is a band" project -- well, at least it was intended that way, but Grohl pushed aside drummer William Goldsmith during the recording and played on

Overview

Taking a cue from the old Blondie marketing slogan, the sophomore effort from Dave Grohl's post-Nirvana band was their "The Foo Fighters is a band" project -- well, at least it was intended that way, but Grohl pushed aside drummer William Goldsmith during the recording and played on the entire record. And who could blame him? When you're the greatest drummer in rock, it's hard to sit aside for someone else, no matter how good your intentions, and Grohl's drumming does give the Foos muscle underneath their glossy exterior. That slickness arrives via producer Gil Norton, hired based on his work with the Pixies, but he manages to give The Colour and the Shape almost too sleek a sheen, something that comes as a shock after the raggedness of the group's debut. Even the glossy final mix of Nevermind has nothing on the unapologetic arena rock of The Colour and the Shape -- it's all polished thunder, rock & roll that's about precision not abandon. Some may miss that raw aggression of Grohl's earlier work, but he's such a strong craftsman and musician that such exactness also suits him, highlighting his sense of melody and melodrama, elements abundantly in display on the album's two biggest hits, the brooding midtempo rockers "My Hero" and "Everlong." Elsewhere, the Foos grind out three-chord rockers with an aplomb that almost disguises just how slick Norton's production is, but everything here, from the powerful rush of the band to the big hooks and sleek surface, wound up defining the sound of post-grunge modern rock, and it remains as perhaps the best example of its kind. [Legacy's tenth anniversary edition of The Colour and the Shape was expanded by six bonus tracks, adding a clutch of non-LP B-sides, the highlight of which is a version of Gerry Rafferty's "Baker Street."]

Product Details

Release Date:
10/07/2003
Label:
Rca Victor Europe
UPC:
0828765549523
catalogNumber:
655495
Rank:
79949

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Foo Fighters   Primary Artist
Pat Smear   Guitar,Group Member
Dave Grohl   Guitar,Drums,Vocals,Group Member
William Goldsmith   Drums,Hand Clapping,Group Member
Nate Mendel   Bass
Chris Bilheimer   Hand Clapping
Ryan Boesch   Hand Clapping
Lance Bangs   Hand Clapping

Technical Credits

Bradley Cook   Engineer
Dave Grohl   Composer
Gil Norton   Producer
Foo Fighters   Composer,Art Direction
Jeff Turner   Engineer
Tommy Steele   Art Direction
Andy Engel   Logo Design
Jeffery Fey   Art Direction
Giacomo Marchesi   Artwork

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The Colour and the Shape 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Colour and the Shape is a masterpiece of music, ranging from your harder styles of songs, like Monkey Wrnech, to your softer listening, such as February Stars. My personal favourite is My Hero, but you will see that it is a\hard to decide between each song's personal worth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Colour and the Shape is one of the best rock CDs I have ever heard. "Monkeywrench," which you've probably heard on the radio, is a fair indicator of how super cool this whole album is. Buy it if you like modern rock at all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For those of you who are familiar with Green Day's DOOKIE, you'll know how a great album should flow. Though RollingStone rated DOOKIE 193 out of their top 500 greatest albums, The Colour and the Shape still comes first in my book. This album flows more smoothly than any album I've ever heard. There isn't one bad song on this album, and songs like "Everlong" and "Hero" have become rock classics. But what really makes this album rock is the Dave Grohl's contrast between songs: The short and sweet "Doll" gets slammed head-on with "Monkey Wrench", which also shows Dave's punk roots. And then comes the uncreative but very entertaining screaming of "Enough Space", which is followed by the quiet rock ballad "February Stars". Let me put it this way: IF YOU DON'T BY THIS ALBUM, IT'S BECAUSE OF A CHARACTER FLAW
Anonymous More than 1 year ago