The Column and the Arch; Essays on Architectural History

The Column and the Arch; Essays on Architectural History

by William Pitt Preble Longfellow
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally… See more details below

Overview

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781407661018
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
01/10/2012
Pages:
390
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)

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THE AGE OF CONSTANTINE If we look back in the history of Bome to the accession of Constantino, at the beginning of the fourth century, we shall remember that, though her prestige remained, influence and energy were long gone out of her. The seat of influence was the seat of military power, that is, the army ; and the army was kept busy on the frontiers, where the barbarians were always harrying the empire, and especially in the East. The army had for a long time made the emperors; some of the most noted of them were provincials, of barbarian stock. Septimius Severus was an African, Diocletian an Illyrian; Constantine, born in Mcesia in Asia Minor, was made emperor at York. Rome had little to do with the empire except to live on it, and be its figure-head. The active emperors spent their time away from her, and some of them never saw her during their reigns; she lived in indolent tranquillity, undisturbed except for occasional riots. Her population consisted of the oldpatrician families, who lived on their incomes, supported their troops of dependents, and gave the tone to the city; the tradesmen and workpeople, mostly slaves and freedmen; and the idle populace, who held themselves superior to the tradesmen and work-people, and lived on the largess of the empire. She had no stirring middle class; commerce was nothing to her. The city was finished, overbuilt indeed; her art and literature, imported from Greece, were decadent, and given over to the lifeless imitation of old models. The Senate still sat and legislated perfunctorily ; its only duty was to pass the edicts of the emperors. Rome was the stagnant home of old traditions, old customs, old ideas, and old superstitions. She wasfull of an overweening veneration for the traditions and memories of her old greatness, and close...

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