The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II [NOOK Book]

Overview

Among the allied troops that came ashore in Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, were thirteen Comanches in the 4th Infantry Division, 4th Signal Company. Under German fire they laid communications lines and began sending messages in a form never before heard in Europe-coded Comanche. For the rest of World War II, the Comanche Code Talkers played a vital role in transmitting orders and messages in a code that was never broken by the Germans. This book tells the full story of the Comanche Code Talkers for the first ...
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The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II

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Overview

Among the allied troops that came ashore in Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944, were thirteen Comanches in the 4th Infantry Division, 4th Signal Company. Under German fire they laid communications lines and began sending messages in a form never before heard in Europe-coded Comanche. For the rest of World War II, the Comanche Code Talkers played a vital role in transmitting orders and messages in a code that was never broken by the Germans. This book tells the full story of the Comanche Code Talkers for the first time. Drawing on interviews with all surviving members of the unit, their original training officer, and fellow soldiers, as well as military records and news accounts, William C. Meadows follows the group from their recruitment and training to their active duty in World War II and on through their postwar lives up to the present. He also provides the first comparison of Native American code talking programs, comparing the Comanche Code Talkers with their better-known Navajo counterparts in the Pacific and with other Native Americans who used their languages, coded or not, for secret communication. Meadows sets this history in a larger discussion of the development of Native American code talking in World Wars I and II, identifying two distinct forms of Native American code talking, examining the attitudes of the American military toward Native American code talkers, and assessing the complex cultural factors that led Comanche and other Native Americans to serve their country in this way.
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What People Are Saying

Tom Holm
Of all the books on Native American service in the U.S. armed forces, this is the best. . . . Readers will find the story of the Comanche Code Talkers compelling, humorous, thought-provoking, and inspiring.
Tom Holm
Of all the books on Native American service in the U.S. armed forces, this is the best. . . . Readers will find the story of the Comanche Code Talkers compelling, humorous, thought-provoking, and inspiring.
Tom Holm, author of Strong Hearts, Wounded Souls: Native American Veterans of the Vietnam War
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780292778429
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press
  • Publication date: 3/6/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 680,099
  • File size: 6 MB

Meet the Author

WILLIAM C. MEADOWS is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Indiana State University.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Notes on the Comanche Sound System by Jean O. Charney

Chapter 1: The Origins of Native American Code Talking
Chapter 2: Native American Veterans and Code Talkers in World War II
Chapter 3: "Get him back on that scale and weigh him again!"
Chapter 4: "Utekwapa naka: I hear what you say."
Chapter 5: Fighting Po'sataiboo': Crazy White Man
Chapter 6: "Numurekwa'etuu: Comanche Speakers!"

Appendix A: Members of Company E, 142d Infantry, Thirty-sixth Division, World War I
Appendix B: World War I Choctaw Code Talkers
Appendix C: Organization of the Fourth Infantry Division, 1941-1945
Appendix D: Combat Narrative of the Fourth Infantry Division
Appendix E: Fourth Infantry Division Campaign (June 6, 1944, to May 8, 1945)
Appendix F: Fourth Signal Company Activities, 1940-1945
Appendix G: Glossary of Comanche Code Terms
Appendix H: Known Native American Code Talkers of World Wars I and II (Tribes, Group Size, Form of Code Talking, and Military Units)

Notes
Bibliography
Index

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