Come Home

( 143 )

Overview

Lisa Scottoline has delivered taut thrillers with a powerful emotional wallop in her New York Times bestsellers Save Me, Think Twice, and Look Again. Now, with her new novel, Come Home, she ratchets up the suspense with the riveting story of a mother who sacrifices her future for a child from her past.

Jill Farrow is a typical suburban mom who has finally gotten her and her daughter's lives back on track after a divorce. She is about to remarry, her job as a pediatrician ...

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Overview

Lisa Scottoline has delivered taut thrillers with a powerful emotional wallop in her New York Times bestsellers Save Me, Think Twice, and Look Again. Now, with her new novel, Come Home, she ratchets up the suspense with the riveting story of a mother who sacrifices her future for a child from her past.

Jill Farrow is a typical suburban mom who has finally gotten her and her daughter's lives back on track after a divorce. She is about to remarry, her job as a pediatrician fulfills her—-though it is stressful—-and her daughter, Megan, is a happily over-scheduled thirteen-year-old juggling homework and the swim team.

But Jill’s life is turned upside down when her ex-stepdaughter, Abby, shows up on her doorstep late one night and delivers shocking news: Jill’s ex-husband is dead. Abby insists that he was murdered and pleads with Jill to help find his killer. Jill reluctantly agrees to make a few inquiries and discovers that things don’t add up. As she digs deeper, her actions threaten to rip apart her new family, destroy their hard-earned happiness, and even endanger her own life. Yet Jill can’t turn her back on a child she loves and once called her own.

Come Home reads with the breakneck pacing of a thriller while also exploring the definition of motherhood, asking the questions: Do you ever stop being a mother? Can you ever have an ex-child? What are the limits to love of family? 

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Jill Ruspoli's divorce nearly destroyed her, but now, this hard-working pediatrician is back on her feet, happier than ever, and newly engaged to a kind and thoughtful medical researcher. All that is put implicitly in jeopardy when her ex-stepdaughter Abby arrives at her front door frantic with the news of her former husband's demise. Abby is convinced that her father has been murdered, but even seriously entertaining that question threatens to destabilize everything that Jill has built since her disastrous breakup. Lisa Scottoline's new mystery knots together heart-wrenching personal issues and whodunit suspense. Finely plotted and well-written; a worthy crossover read.

Jules Herbert

Publishers Weekly
Complex family dynamics and carefully concealed secrets drive this gripping stand-alone from Edgar-winner Scottoline (Save Me). Jill Farrow, a Philadelphia pediatrician, and her teenage daughter, Megan, live with Jill’s calm and forbearing fiancé, Sam Becker. When Jill’s estranged 19-year-old ex-stepdaughter, Abby Skyler, rushes into Jill’s home late one rainy night to tell her that her ex-husband, William, is dead, apparently of a drug overdose, Jill can summon little sympathy for the unscrupulous William. When the distraught Abby insists that her father was murdered and that Jill must help her find his killer, Jill is reluctant to get involved, particularly since the police can find no evidence of a crime. As Jill tries to juggle her duties as doctor, mother, and sleuth, her delving into William’s murky past puts emotional strain on Megan and jeopardizes her relationship with Sam. A surfeit of melodrama and some anemic subplots are unlikely to deter the author’s many loyal fans. Author tour. Agent: Molly Friedrich, Friedrich Literary Agency. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Pediatrician Jill Farrow lives an ordinary suburban life with her 13-year-old daughter, supportive fiancé, and well-fed golden retriever until a midnight visitor turns her idyllic life upside down. Jill's ex-stepdaughter Abby arrives with the news that Jill's ex-husband, William, is dead and she suspects foul play. Despite distaste for her ex and a three-year estrangement from her two stepdaughters, Jill begins investigating William's death to help Abby obtain closure. Fueled by her strong maternal instincts, Abby's quest for the truth propels her into a dangerous cat-and-mouse chase that risks her closest relationships and threatens her life. VERDICT Scottoline (Save Me; Look Again) deftly speeds readers through a dizzying labyrinth of intrigue with more hairpin turns and heart-pounding drops than a theme-park ride. This thrilling testament to a mother's relentless love may well be Scottoline's best novel to date. Her many fans and other mystery/thriller aficionados will want to read it. [300,000-copy first printing; national tour; see Prepub Alert, 10/31/11.]—Mary Todd Chesnut, Northern Kentucky Univ. Lib., Highland Heights
Kirkus Reviews
Another stand-alone suspenser that rams home the point that there's no such thing as an ex-mother. Pharmaceutical rep William Skyler blamed his divorce on his wife, Dr. Jill Farrow. He told his daughters, Victoria and Abby, that Jill had cheated on him and forbade them to keep in touch with her or her own daughter Megan. Now, three years later, William is dead, overdosed on prescription medications Abby is convinced he didn't take himself. What's Jill supposed to do when Abby drives unannounced to the home she shares with diabetes researcher Sam Becker, drunk, weeping hysterically and begging for help? Nothing, maintains Sam, who tells Jill that she's choosing continuing loyalty to Abby (and to Victoria, who makes it witheringly clear at William's funeral that she still wants nothing to do with Jill) over her commitment to him and his son Steven. Nothing, say the Philadelphia police, who insist that William's death was no homicide. Nothing, Jill's penny-pinching medical-practice manager Sheryl Ewing says--or would surely say if Jill, already playing out a losing hand in office politics, ever brought it up to her. Naturally, Jill, protesting, "What's a mother, or a stepmother?...Isn't it forever?," takes it upon herself to investigate anyway. Scottoline backs her increasingly beset supermom ("It wasn't a juggling act, it was a magic act") into sleuthing mode with practiced expertise, giving her exactly the right motivations and qualifications for the specific questions she asks. And there'll be a lump in every throat when Abby disappears and when Jill fights to diagnose a baby who keeps getting ear infections. As usual with Scottoline, though, the complications are a lot more satisfying than the windup, in which reason and plausibility take a back seat to tearful family affirmations. Connoisseurs of mother love imperiled will prefer Save Me (2011). But it would be a mistake to count Scottoline out; she's sure to be back next year with another dose that might be even more potent.
From the Publisher

Praise for Save Me

“You won’t be able to put this one down.”---Jodi Picoult, author of Sing You Home and House Rules

"Powerful, provocative, and page-turning!"--Emily Giffin, New York Times bestselling author of Heart of the Matter and Something Borrowed

“A white-hot crossover novel about the perils of mother love . . . Scottoline shifts gears at every curve with the cool efficiency of a NASCAR driver.”--Kirkus Reviews
 

“A novel packed with excitement and emotion, Save Me is a gut-clenching, heart-stirring read.”--Sandra Brown, author of Tough Customer
 

"...a satisfying, nail-biting thriller."--Publishers Weekly

“Heart-pounding! Open up Save Me, and save yourself with a great book.”--Lisa Gardner, author of Live to Tell

“Scottoline masterfully fits every detail into a tight plot chock-full of real characters, real issues, and real thrills. A story anchored by the impenetrable power of a mother’s love, it begs the question, just how far would you go to save your child?”--Booklist

"Save Me is thrilling and infused with love. Brilliant, I couldn’t put it down.”--Louise Penny, author of Bury Your Dead

 

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312380823
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/10/2012
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 687,912
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Lisa Scottoline

Lisa Scottoline is a New York Times bestselling and Edgar Award—winning author of eighteen novels. She has served as the president of the Mystery Writers of America and her recent novel Look Again has been optioned for a feature film. She is a weekly columnist for The Philadelphia Inquirer and her columns have been collected in two books and optioned for television. She has 25 million copies of her books in print in the United States, and she has been published in thirty countries. She lives in the Philadelphia area with an array of disobedient pets.

Biography

Most authors admit that they need to work in silence in order to get into the creative process. For them, writing is serious work that requires the utmost peace and concentration. Of course, most authors are not writing the kind of whiz-bang, sharp, wild, and witty works that Lisa Scottoline is producing. Scottoline's unusual working methods and desire for all things pop culture have helped her to create some of the most unapologetically entertaining and compulsively page-turning novels in contemporary popular fiction.

Scottoline's initial impetus to become a novelist was not quite as joyful as her novels might suggest. She had recently given up her position as a litigator at a Philadelphia law firm to raise her newborn daughter at the same time as she was breaking up with her husband. While the birth of her daughter was an undoubtedly happy moment for Scottoline, she was also thrust into relative isolation in the wake of her separation and the end of her job. To keep herself busy (when not tending to her daughter, that is), she decided to write a novel, the provocative story of an ambitious young lawyer whose hectic life becomes even more manic when she learns she is being stalked. Three years after beginning the novel, Scottoline sold Everywhere That Mary Went to HarperCollins a mere week after taking a part-time job as a clerk for an appellate judge—her first job since beginning the book. While her transition from lawyer to novelist may seem abrupt to some, Scottoline asserts that it was law school that gave her the necessary tools to spin a compelling yarn. In a 2005 interview with Barnes & Noble.com, Scottoline asserted that the job of a lawyer is surprisingly similar to that of a good writer: "Take the facts that matter, throw out the ones that don't, order them in such a way in which a point of view is created so that by the time someone is finished listening to your argument or reading your book they see things completely in that point of view."

Scottoline's sure-handed way with an intriguing narrative has led to a string of bestselling thrillers and a popular series revolving around the women of Rosato & Associates, an all-female law firm in Philadelphia—the author's own beloved hometown. Jam-packed with humor, mystery, eroticism, and smarts, her novels are published worldwide and have been translated into twenty-five different languages.

Good To Know

Lisa Scottoline is definitely no TV snob. She feels no shame when revealing her love of everything from Court TV to Oprah to The Apprentice to I Love Lucy.

One of the reasons that Scottoline is such a fabulous writer may have something to do with having a particularly fabulous teacher. While studying English at the University of Pennsylvania she was instructed by National Book Award Winner Philip Roth.

Don't try this at home! Scottoline completed her first novel, Everywhere That Mary Went, while she and her newborn daughter lived solely on $35,000 worth of credit from five Visa cards, which she'd completely maxed out by the time she completed the book three years later.

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    1. Hometown:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Date of Birth:
      July 1, 1955
    2. Place of Birth:
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1976; J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School, 1981
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

 

Jill stopped on the stairway, listening. She thought she heard a voice calling her from outside, but she’d been wrong before. It was probably the rushing of the rain, or the lash of the wind through the trees. Still, she listened, hoping.

“Babe?” Sam paused on the stair, resting his hand on the banister. He looked back at her, his eyes a puzzled blue behind his glasses. “Did you forget your phone?”

“No, I thought I heard something.” Jill didn’t elaborate. She was in her forties, old enough to have a past and wise enough to keep her thoughts about it to herself.

“What?” Sam asked, patiently. It was almost midnight, and they’d been on their way to bed. The house was dark except for the glass fixture above the stairwell, and the silvery strands in Sam’s thick, dark hair glinted in the low light. Their chubby golden retriever, Beef, was already upstairs, looking down at them from the landing, his buttery ears falling forward.

“It’s nothing, I guess.” Jill started back up the stairs, but Beef swung his head toward the front of the house and gave an excited bark. His tail started to wag, and Jill turned, too, listening again.

Jill! Jill!

“It’s Abby!” Jill heard it for sure, this time. The cry resonated in her chest, speaking directly to her heart. She turned around and hurried for the entrance hall, and Beef scampered downstairs after her, his heavy butt getting ahead of him, like a runaway tractor-trailer.

“Abby who?” Sam called after her. “Your ex’s kid?”

“Yes.” Jill reached the front door, twisted the deadbolt, flicked on the porch light, and threw open the door. Abby wasn’t there, and Jill didn’t see her because it was so dark. There were no streetlights at this end of the block, and the rain obliterated the outlines of the houses and cars, graying out the suburban scene. Suddenly, a black SUV with only one headlight drove past, spotlighting a silhouette that Jill would know anywhere. It was Abby, but she was staggering down the sidewalk as if she’d been injured.

“Sam, call 911!” Jill bolted out of the house and into the storm, diagnosing Abby on the fly. It could have been a hit-and-run, or an aneurysm. Not a stroke, Abby was too young. Not a gunshot or stab wound, in this neighborhood.

Jill tore through the rain. Beef bounded ahead, barking in alarm. The neighbor’s motion-detector went on, casting a halo of light on their front lawn. Abby stumbled off the sidewalk. Her purse slipped from her shoulder and dropped to the ground. Abby took a few more faltering steps, then collapsed, crumpling to the grass.

“Abby!” Jill screamed, sprinting to Abby’s side, kneeling down. Abby was conscious, but crying. Jill reached for her pulse and scanned her head and body for signs of injury, and there were none. Rainwater covered Abby’s face, streaking her mascara and blackening her tears. Her hair stuck to her neck, and rain plastered her thin sundress to her body. Her pulse felt strong and steady, bewildering Jill. “Abby, Abby, what is it?”

“You have to … hold me.” Abby raised her arms. “Please.”

Jill gathered Abby close, shielding her from the rain. She’d held Abby so many times before, and all the times rushed back at her, as if her very body had stored the memories, until that very moment. Jill flashed on the time Abby had fallen off her Rollerblades, breaking an ankle. Then the time Abby had gotten a C on her trig final. The time she didn’t get picked for the travel soccer team. Abby had always been a sensitive little girl, but she wasn’t a little girl anymore, and Jill had never seen her cry so hard.

“Abby, honey, please, tell me, and I can help.”

“I can’t say it … it’s so awful.” Abby sobbed, and Jill caught a distinct whiff of alcohol on her breath and came up to speed. Abby wasn’t injured, she’d been drinking. Jill hadn’t seen her in three years, and Abby had grown up; she’d be nineteen now. Abby sobbed harder. “Jill, Dad’s dead … he’s dead.”

What?” Jill gasped, shocked. Her ex-husband was in excellent health, still in his forties. “How?”

“Somebody … killed him.” Abby dissolved into tears, her body going limp, clinging to Jill. “Please, you have to … help me. I have to find out … who did it.”

Jill hugged her closer, feeling her grief and struggling to process what had happened. She couldn’t imagine William as a murder victim, or a victim of any kind, for that matter, but her first thought was of his daughters, Abby and Victoria, and her own daughter, Megan. The news would devastate all of them, Megan included. William was her stepfather, but the only father she’d ever known. Her real father had died before she was born.

“Babe, what are you doing? Let’s get her into the house!” Sam shouted, to be heard over the rain. He was kneeling on Abby’s other side, though Jill didn’t know when he’d gotten there.

“William’s been murdered,” Jill told him, sounding numb, even to herself.

“I heard. We’re not calling 911, she’s just drunk.” Sam squinted against the brightness of the motion-detector light. Raindrops soaked his hair and dappled his polo shirt. “Let me take her arm. Lift her on one, two, three,” he counted off, tugging Abby’s arm.

“Okay, go.” Jill took Abby’s other arm, and together they hoisted her, sobbing, to her feet, gathered her purse, and half walked and half carried her toward the house, sloshing through the grass, with Beef at their heels.

Jill tried to collect her thoughts, which were in turmoil. She’d always dreamed of seeing Abby again, but not in these circumstances, and she dreaded telling Megan about William. But as agonized as she felt for the girls, Jill wouldn’t shed a tear for her ex-husband. There was a reason she had divorced the man, and it was a whopper.

And evidently, not only the good died young.

 

Copyright © 2012 by Lisa Scottoline

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Reading Group Guide

A Letter from Lisa Scottoline

I’m so happy to have the chance to talk with you more informally, outside the four corners of this book, to tell you something about what inspired the novel. Not every author is as confessional as I am but I find that the more I write—for twenty years, now—the more I connect with my readers; I bring the emotions that I’ve experienced in real life to power my fiction and to give it greater dramatic impact. More importantly, if the novel is powered by real emotions, from life-changing events like this one, I think the reader feels it, which gives the book a deeper meaning of its own. To me, the highest and best purpose of fiction is to connect us, one to the other, and to reinforce the commonality of human experience. At bottom, great fiction tells you that you’re not alone in the world—you feel that at soul-level, in the most subtle of ways, through plot, character, and narrative drive. So here’s a little background on what inspired me to write Come Home.

Many of my more recent novels, probably starting with Look Again and continuing to Save Me and, now, Come Home, have explored the parameters of motherhood. I’ve been a single mother for most of my life and my relationship with my daughter Francesca means so much to me in so many ways, but now that she’s up and out of the house I find myself pondering the subject of motherhood more and more. Part of this is because I’m a mother, and part is because I’m a daughter, too. Those of you who have read the humorous memoirs that Francesca and I write together, like Best Friends, Occasional Enemies, will know that I was raised by a strong, feisty, and funny mother, who I call Mother Mary; and she has been, in many ways, my loving, if occasionally cranky, lodestar for this examination.

But I have a life experience that Mother Mary never had, in that after almost ten years of being a single mother I got married again—to a man with three daughters. And so I became stepmother to three children. Two of my stepdaughters lived with us and getting to know them, love them, and become their stepmother was an amazing and interesting, if occasionally challenging, experience. Unfortunately, the marriage didn’t last, ending in divorce; by that point, my stepdaughters were in college, but suffice it to say that my period of stepmotherhood has effectively ended.

Now that’s an interesting experience, for someone who regards herself as a mother, first and foremost. It led naturally to all sorts of questions that you will find lurking in the subtext of Come Home, such as: Is it possible to be an ex-mother? Do you ever really stop being a mother? What are the boundaries of stepparenthood? How does it begin, and how does it end, if it does? Do you trade past for present, where children are involved? Do you owe a stepchild the same duty you owe your children, beyond the marriage? How can a tie that grows organically from love be influenced by law, much less severed?

I don’t think these questions are often discussed in public, or in fiction, though becoming a stepmother, and becoming an ex-stepmother, is a common experience these days. For better or for worse, marriages aren’t lasting through better or worse, and children are always affected, albeit in varying degrees. This underlying uneasiness with families reconfiguring and recombining has been called blending, but as you can see in Come Home, trying to blend a family can sometimes turn it into a dog’s dinner, especially when the unexpected happens, as it does in the novel.

And somehow, when there are disparate elements to be reconciled in families, my experience has been that it’s usually the mother who provides the glue. It isn’t an easy task, and in Come Home, Jill struggles mightily with it, not only when she has to choose to fit her former stepdaughter Abby back into her life, but also later, when she has to deal with Sam’s apparent resentment over the fact that she hasn’t been making time for his son. Consider that Jill is a mom with a child of her own, former stepchildren, and a current stepson. Anybody who’s been in that position knows that that’s more plates in the air than most moms can handle. I suspect, too, that if you haven’t been in that position, you can relate to it anyway; because, in my experience, women are somehow always making sure that everybody in the room is happy and healthy, whether they’re tied by blood, by law, or not at all. Myself, I am generally responsible for the health and welfare of most of the tristate area, and I bet you are, too.

So that’s the secret thinking behind Come Home that led me to want to explore the subject more deeply, and in fiction. As I said in the Acknowledgments of the novel, the characters in Come Home are not my own family, or ex-family, or real people at all, and that, again, is the great merit of fiction. Books enable us to go deeper into our emotions and the everyday crises that keep us on the telephone with our girlfriends, with our mothers, or even with the other members of our book clubs. I always think that as society becomes increasingly more complex and spread out, the explosion of book clubs proves that people look to fiction to bring them together, not all only to each other, but ultimately to themselves.

I feel honored that you are reading Come Home and I’m very grateful for your support. Thank you for your time. I hope that you enjoyed reading it, and that you will give my other books a try.

Sincerely,

Lisa Scottoline

Ideas for Book Groups 

I am a huge fan of book clubs because it means people are reading and discussing books. Mix that with wine and carbs, and you can’t keep me away. I’m deeply grateful to all who read me, and especially honored when my book is chosen by a book club. I wanted an opportunity to say thank you to those who read me, which gave me the idea of a contest. Every year I hold a book-club contest and the winning book club gets a visit from me and a night of fabulous food and good wine. To enter is easy: all you have to do is take a picture of your entire book club with each member holding a copy of my newest hardcover and send it to me by mail or e-mail. No book club is too small or too big. Don’t belong to a book club? Start one. Just grab a loved one, a neighbor or friend, and send in your picture of you each holding my newest book. I look forward to coming to your town and wining and dining with your group.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 143 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(52)

4 Star

(30)

3 Star

(21)

2 Star

(20)

1 Star

(20)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 143 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2012

    Cathy P

    Was very disappointed in this latest book by Lisa Scottoline. It was not up to her usual novels and I had a tough time getting through it. The main character was very unlikeable. Anyone who is a fan of Lisa Scottoline's book and has been eagerly awaiting this book will be just as disappointed as I was

    12 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 19, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    I've read many books by this author, so naturally had to get the

    I've read many books by this author, so naturally had to get the this book. Engaging Quick Read!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 27, 2012

    I always pre-order any book by Ms. Scottoline. I have read almo

    I always pre-order any book by Ms. Scottoline. I have read almost all her books -- This one, however, proved to be a disappointment. When there were about 100 pages left, I almost set the book aside. I was frankly just tired of waiting for something to start. Then, within those last pages, Lisa threw in all the resolutions to the various plots and subplots, Much of it seemed far-fetched and contrived --- I didn't believe her being a doctor -- she didn't truly seem devoted to her career. I have seen in print, this book referred to as a thriller. It is in no way a thriller. And, it definitely lacks what I've seen as Lisa's skill in mystery writing. I miss Bennie Rosato and the girls and those mysteries. Lisa, please return to your true talent as a mystery writer!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2012

    Not worth the money or the time. Can i take a st.ar away?

    So simplistic, such an utterly dilikable protagonist, characters not fleshed out i wanted to quit reading but i paid for the book and presumed it had to get better. it didn't. This woman would have been dead fifteen times. The author made jill smarter than the fbi and the cia and the police and she was a pediatrician also. Do not buy this book unless you enjoy being irritated

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2012

    Anonymous

    Good read......but please bring back Bennie, Mary, and the gang back as soon as you can! They have become like family. I KNOW you like to be challenged by new characters......and I have enjoyed them all, but Bennie and her team have a lot of good stories left for you to tell!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Job & good storyline. I enjoyed this so much. It held m

    Good Job & good storyline. I enjoyed this so much. It held my attention and I wanted to see what was going to happen so kept reading. The author took time to develop the characters very well, no rushing...so by time the story was over you felt like they were family. I'd recommend it, worth the time.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Seemed too much like a romance novel. Rather shallow and not li

    Seemed too much like a romance novel. Rather shallow and not like her other books.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Definite recommendation for an enjoyable read.

    Enjoyed this book. Engaging and a quick read.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Excellent read!

    This book is different from Lisa Scottoline's earlier novels but highly interesting. I could not put this book down. She gives new insight to being a mother and step-mother together with some legal action toward the end of the book. A must read!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    Amazing!!!

    Seriously...... I was on edge from the very beginning of this book. I loved it and I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a suspenseful novel with a touch of heartfelt drama and heartpounding twists.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Dull

    I had to force myself to read this book. The characters were boring. The entire book was boring. I feel cheated because I paid $30 for this book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 28, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Do we ever stop being a mother to our children? For Jill being

    Do we ever stop being a mother to our children?

    For Jill being a mother doesn’t have a time clock or a switch to turn off even after a divorce. So when Abby, the stepdaughter she thought was lost to her when her marriage fell apart comes crashing into her home Jill never hesitates to open the door. The man she is about to marry is not as thrilled with the baggage from a prior marriage invading their space, but realizes this part of her past overlays the present.

    Jill tries to piece the bits of information Abby is explaining about Jill’s ex-husbands death. It has been ruled a suicide but Abby believes that it was murder and her case may be wrecked with emotional outbursts but the facts seem to be strong. Jill should stay out of it and manage her own daughter’s life but a mother never walks away from a child in need regardless of whether they are tied by blood or not. Abby pulls Jill into the tangled web of deception that was the man she thought she loved life. Her ex-husband was always under the radar pulling one swindle after another but the one that may have cost him everything was a house built on a very fine paper trail. Jill pulls fact from all the fiction trying to involve the authorities who just won’t buy into her hypothesis, even one well construed.

    Lisa Scottoline knows how to write a story will be pull you in emotionally and keep you riveted to the end.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2013

    Res 1

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2013

    Boring

    Glad I got this from the library. Was drawn out and complicated at the end. Have read better books by this author. Noted discrepancies, such as beeping car doors locked then exiting; buying frozen groceries, delivering some of the groceries to Abby, going to the pharmacy and treat a sick baby, view camera surveillance, then going home. Don't think frozen anymore. Dif not think story was plausible with a doctor playing detective.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2013

    good quick read

    Different from Scottoline's other books. Overall book was good.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    Good read

    Enjoyed reading this book and have decided to read some other books by this author. Lots of twists and turns to keep you interested.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    country girl 77

    First time I read a book by this author. Was so nice to read a book without bad language & sex! Am looking forward to reading more by Lisa Scottoline! Would recommend to everyone!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2013

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    Did Not Care for this book!

    Did not care for this book – very slow, long and drawn out! The whining drove me nuts on the audio and could not wait for it to end. Would not recommend! Jill is about to remarry and her ex-stepdaughter shows up stating Jill’s ex-husband is dead. Abby insists that he was murdered and pleads with Jill to help find his killer. Jill reluctantly agrees and opens up a world she did not know from her ex-husband’s life and gets in the middle of the downfall.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Mommy Dearest

    Let’s state from the very first: This is a potboiler of a novel. It reads more like the script for a soap opera. It can’t make up its mind whether it’s a murder mystery, criminal investigation, or family saga. It shifts from one element to another without much consistency.

    The plot involves Dr. Jill Farrow, a pediatrician with a 13-year-old daughter by her deceased first husband, divorced from her second husband with no contact with his two college-age daughters, and living with Sam Becker, about to become her third mate, who has a grown-up son living in Texas. Then one of her ex-stepdaughters shows up informing her that her ex is dead and that she suspects murder. This sets off a series of situations in which Dr. Farrow investigates the possibility of foul play. Meanwhile, interjected in the plot are various family problems, misunderstandings and crises.

    There are a number of inaccuracies in the story, as well, but they can’t be cited without disclosing plot details. I guess a lot of tightening could have averted some of the over-plotting. The author certainly can write. But sometimes mommy doesn’t know best.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Well written, suspenseful and Emotiona read.

    Well written, suspenseful and Emotiona read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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